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ALL VISITORS ARE R. , , ^ 
TO HAVE VISITORS PASSES 

S OF 



._■■- HILL 
NEAR LINCOLN ST ) 



FOR • 

CAl^L 672-3000 



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campus bus service 



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Bureaucracy: working with quadruplicate 

forms to be sent to five places . . . and 

when the third place isn't contacted, you'll 

find out sooner, or usually later. 





If LUGIBLE 

FDRSLEllVJCE HERE 
STDniMUEi £flRfl 

HUST SMW PflYMiML Of 

COMPREREILSIVE FEE 
EQR CURRENT OUR RIER 



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■ / ! ^Y- NO TvEFUNDS SALES SLIPS' 

, ^^^ j\ 6R returns) NECESSARY 




bureaucracy/17 




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andrew patton airporl 19 



The tennis team played 9 
games; won 3, lost 6, had sche- 
duled 14. 

Each serving player is allowed 
two attempts. Services must 
land in the forecourt diagonally 
across from the server. The ball 
may bounce only once in area 
of play before being returned to 







opponent. Area of play in sin- 
gles matches uses the narrower 
lateral boundaries; doubles 
matches the wider. 

Racket: stringed instrument to 
return service 

Service: movement initiating 
volley propelling ball into op- 
ponent's area of return 

Service line: extreme rear 
boundaries of playing area 
from which service is made 

Volley: Ball in play before 
touching in area of play- 
usually struck to opponent's 
forecourt 

No Man's Land: area between 
baseline and service line 

Forecourt: area between net 
and centerline running paral- 
lel to net 




April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



6: 

8: 

10. 

11. 

16. 

17: 

18. (X) 



(R) 



April 20. 
April 21 
April 24. 
April 25. 
April 28. 
May 1 . 
May 2: 



(R) 



May 5: 
May 6. 
May 8. (X) 

May 9: 



May 13 
May 15 
May 16 
May 20 



(X) 



Kent 17 




West Liberty 3 


Kent 8 




Cleveland State 6 


Kent 5 




Western Mich.- 15 


Kent 8 




Western Mich.* 11 


Kent 3 




West Liberty 


Kent 




Ohio University* 3 


Kent 1 




Ohio University* 8 


Kent 3 




Ohio 
University* 10 


Kent 15 




Cleveland State 6 


Kent 6 




Buffalo 8 


Kent 3 




Marshall 4 


Kent 3 




Marshall 1 


Kent 10 




Eastern Mich. 6 


Kent 10 




B.G.* 14 


Kent 




no score recorded 




^ 


E.G.* 

O.S.U. 

Eastern Mich. 


^V^ 


University of 


^y 


Toledo 


^^ 




University of 

Toledo 

Xavier 

Miami University* 

Miami University* 

Pittsburgh 



'Conference games (X) Double-headers: (F,; Double-headers: 2nd game rained out 





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Despite an interrupted 
season, one Kent State 
record was set by Al 
Schoterman in the ham- 
merthrow, placing sixth in 
the nation and on the Ail- 
American list. No other 
records were set. 




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ROTC began nationally in 1 862 with the Morrill Act, which granted federal 
lands to states for construction of colleges if mandatory ROTC was 
required. Citizens were concerned that a large standing army com- 
manded by professional officers would result in the development of an 
elite corps of professional "power" men, educated in military academics. 
With civilian schooling, however, the resulting officers would assure that 
the military represent every facet of American society, from upper class 
to lower. At Kent, a cadet takes 2 hours of Army ROTC per quarter, 
combining an academic classroom phase with drill. An oath of office 
affirms a cadet's commitment unless he resigns from school, where his 
contract is voided. $85,000 worth of furniture, rifles and professional 
effects was lost when East Hall burnt last spring. Lost records were 
replaced but no plan exists for replacement of rifles as it is felt they 
are not essential to the success of the ROTC program. Army ROTC 
is now located in Rockwell Library and will not move off campus as 
they feel they are "simply another campus organization." 




Identification of speakers as they are heard: 



Kcviscd Code. Sec. 2727.02-.03-.05-.08 



It of Common Pleas of said County 



:n-o. 



39343 



said Defendant.?. 

lei. weeK;.f?:/...9aa.."J.Qhn..D.Qe.'. 
Irs 1 - 500 




11/ of ?^sy. A. D. 19. .29.. 

Injoined /row .M?.f?l^i^.2...?nv 



It, starting any fires on 
Iperty owned by said university 



-^7, ctertn«t^»i5> 



"Leave them alone . . . 
James Croocker, Graduate student 

"I recommend that students , . . 
Dr Baron 

"I spoke to the general 
Steue Sharoff, Graduate student 

"They just called me down , . , 
U/l Guard Officer 

"I don't know exactly where 
General Robert Canterbury, Adj. Gen. of Ohio Nat's Guard 

"they've been told to go . . . 
Dr Baron 

"Please, Don't let anyone . , , 
Dr Glenn W Frank, Prof of Geology 

"I don't care whether you've . . . 



itfitil till- further order of the Court. 

WITNESS my t<i$naturc avd the .seal of said Court this 
2n.^. aa;/ Of ^M J9.7.9... 

I C- -U-Y THi^ TO BL' A TRUE COPY 1 r "D (L h. C ^ ''^^ ^^ Clerk 

)? TKi: ORIGINAL WRIT WITH THE"! W.....k^.cC....<^.W..::^...^3:^ Cle?k 

1 NDORSSM^.K'To THEREON. J Deputy 

JOSEPH C. HECt;DUS, Sheriff | 



ROTC began nationally in 1 862 with the Morrill Act, which granted federal 
lands to states lor construction of colleges if mandatory ROTC was 
required Citizens were concerned that a large standing army com- 
manded by professional officers would result in the development of an 
elitecorpsof professional "power" men, educated in r 
With civilian schooling, however, the resulting officer: 
the military represent every facet of American society,! 
to lower At Kent, a cadet takes 2 hours of Army R| 
combining an academic classroom phase with drill, 
affirms a cadet's commitment unless he resigns from I 
contract is voided $85,000 worth of furniture, rifles | 
effects was lost when East Hall burnt last spring 
replaced but no plan exists for replacement of rifles! 
are not essential to the success of the ROTC progij 
is now located in Rockwell Library and will not moJ 
they feel they are "simply another campus organizatil 






-^At/ re/erved^ 



-^V 



Identification of speakers as they are heard: 



and after shootings 



Leave them alone 
James Croocker. Graduate student 

"I recommend that students . , . 
Dr. Baron 

"I spoke to the general , . . 
Steve Sharotf, Graduate student 

"They just called me down . . . 
U/l Guard Officer 

"I don't know exactly where . . . 
General Robert Canterbury, Adj. Gen. of Ohio Nat's Guard 

"they've been told to go . . . 
Dr Baron 

"Please, Don"t let anyone . . . 
Dr. Glenn W. Frank, Prof, of Geology 

'"I don"t care whether you"ve . . . 



ORDER OF INJUNCTION 

Kcviscd Code. Sec. 2727.02-.03-.n5-.08 



THE STATE OF OHIO. 
??.^.t.^ge County. 



STx^TE OF OHIO, EX REL. 

■ iio-^Sl) " o?"truStee s ■ OF 

I<s^^^ state university 



FlalrMff- 



MICiaEL VffiEKLEY and "JOHN 
•E>03'-'-MJ>iE2RS-l- 500 



Court of Common Pleas of said County 

?/o 3934.3 

To the said Defendant.?. 

....Mic!i.aeJ..Week;R:/..3M...':j.Qhn..I)Qe.'. 
Numbers 1-500 



By an order of this CouH made this ^J^.^....day of May. Jl. D. 19..19.. 

as appears by the Journal of said Court, yon arc enjoiried /row.. ]?.?■.?.?? ]5.^.'?.9...?.'?.Y 

windGV7S, defacing any buildings with paint, starting any fires on 
car.ipuc and damaging or destroying any property owned by said university 



until the further order of the Court. 

WITNESS my signature avd the seal «f said Court this 
.2'?.^. aay of «ay. JP..?.9.-. 



C .U-Y THIS TO BH A TRUE COPY 

)? 'iZZ ORIGr-JAL WxRIT WITH THE-f"' 

ndorsj:".'-."!\'To thereon. J 

JOoi-PH C.HEC^CDUS, Sheriff | ' 



L?. 



':^ 



.ck^...Lj>^\:S{..c:KS:\ Clerk 

DcpiitJj 



ROTC began nationally In 1 862 with the Morrill Act, which granted federal 
lands to states for construction of colleges if mandatory ROTC was 
required Citizens were concerned that a large standing army com- 
manded by professional officers would result in the development of an 
elite corps of professional "power" men. educated in r 
With civilian schooling, however, the resulting otfic 
the military represent every facet of American society .1 
to lower At Kent, a cadet takes 2 hours of Army R| 
combining an academic classroom phase with drill, 
affirms a cadet's commitment unless he resigns from I 
contract is voided $85,000 worth of furniture, rifles | 
effects was lost when East Hall burnt last spring, 
replaced but no plan exists for replacement of rifle^ 
are not essential to the success of the ROTC progl 
is now located in Rockwell Library and will not moi| 
they feel they are "simply another campus organi; 



\ 






"i&y/°'r'o. 



JIbht/ re/efved 



fi 




Identification of speakers as ttiey are heard: 



FRIDAY, twlay 1st. 

Mark Heil, WKNT Newsman 

"Ttie 4 big main picture windows . . . 
LeRoy Satrom, Kent Mayor 

"I am distressed and appauled . . . 

SATURDAY. May 2nd, 

Bob Carpenter, WKNT News Director 

"At ttiis minute tfie building . . . 
Walter Moore, Ctiief of Portage County Stieritfs 

"Ladies and gentlemen I suggest . . . 
Carpenter 

"Ttie building just fell in . . 
Col, Arttiur W Dodson, Prof, of Military Science (ROTC) 

"Well I ttiink it's ttie most senseless , , , 
Carpenter 

"Generals Canterbury and Del Corso , . . 
Jotin P, Smith, Dir KSU Radio/TV Information 

"The campus at KSU is relatively calm . . . 
Dr, Robert I White, President of KSU 

"The university's position has , 

SUNDAY, May 3rd, 
(Morning) 

James A, Rhodes, Ohio Governor 

"We've seen here . . . 
LeRoy Satrom, Kent Mayor 

"We'll take all necessary action . . . 
Col, Robert Chiaramonte, Supt, of Ohio State Patrol 

"Well, we're a mobile , , , 
loy Thompson, Kent Police Chief 

"We're going of course to be ., , 
Sen. S. T, Del Corso, Adjutant Gen, Ohio National Guard 

"Well. I don't know about , . 
Satrom 

"At this time we do not have . . . 
Oel Corso 

"I would estimate roughly . . . 
J/l Newsman 

"General Del Corso. how long . . . 
Rhodes 

"I'll answer that , . . 
Del Corso 

"You've got me outranked . . 

(Evening) 

Carpenter 

"The students are now , , , 
UPI Guardsman on bullhorn 

"Attention all Kent State students . . . 
Carpenter 

"Right above me . . . 
John P. Smith 

"Orders to break any outdoor. 

MONDAY. May 4th 

■ . Noon chimes , . . Obvious sounds prior, during and after shootings 

with student comments . . . 

Dr Seymour H. Baron. Chm'n & Prof, of Psychology 

"Leave them alone . . . 
James Croocker, Graduate student 

"I recommend that students . . . 
Dr Baron 

"I spoke to the general , . , 
Steve Sharoff. Graduate student 

"They just called me down , . . 
U/l Guard Officer 

"I don't know exactly where . . . 
General Robert Canterbury. Adj. Gen, of Ohio Nat's Guard 

"they've been told to go , , , 
Dr. Baron 

"Please. Don't let anyone . , . 
Dr Glenn W Frank, Prof, of Geology 

"I don't care whether you've . . . 



ORDSI^ OF INJUNCTION 

Kcviscd Code. Sec, 2727.02-.03-.05-.08 



THE STATE OF OHIO, 
??.?t.^ge County. 



Court of Common Pleas of said County 



STATE OF OHIO, EX REL. 

■■£;a^r<X)""o?"TRuS"TEEs'oF 

KS^rr STATE UNIVERSITY 



MICI-^.EL V/EEKLSY and "JOHN 
■I>03''-->rtJJ'jBSRS— 1- — -soo 



Xo 39343 

ruir4iS—\^ To the said Defendant.?. 

...Michael. Weeklr3j/...5XL(3.."J.Qhn..I).QS.'.'. 
Numbers 1 - 500 



Defendant-^' 



2nd 



.day of May ^. d. ip..70. 



By an order of this Court made this. 

as appears by the Journal of said CouH, you arc enjoined /row..k?.?.a]5.ir\?[...?.>?3:.. 

windov.'s, defacing any buildings with paint, starting any fires on 
carapuG and damaging or destroying any property owned by said university 



untH the further order of the Court. 

WITNESS my signature and the seal «f said Court this 
2nd ^„y p^ May J9.29... 

C-:::FY THIb TO BI^ A TRUE COPY ! e^ (L cL. C.^';A'..Ji^ Clerk 

)? TI-:Z ORIGI-IAL WRIT WITH THE"-^ .-r^^..o^....vj.. ^» 

NDOflSi;!/^E,I\:To THEREON. 



JOSEPH C.HECEDUS, Sheriff 



y JDeputy 



ROTC began nationally in 1 862 with the Morrill Act, which granted federal 
lands to states for construction of colleges if mandatory ROTC was 
required. Citizens were concerned that a large standing army com- 
manded by professional officers would result in the development of an 
elite corps of professional "power" men, educated in military academics. 
With civilian schooling, however, the resulting officers would assure that 
the military represent every facet of American society, from upper class 
to lower. At Kent, a cadet takes 2 hours of Army ROTC per quarter, 
combining an academic classroom phase with drill. An oath of office 
affirms a cadet's commitment unless he resigns from school, where his 
contract is voided. $85,000 worth of furniture, rifles and professional 
effects was lost when East Hall burnt last spring. Lost records were 
replaced but no plan exists for replacement of rifles as it is felt they 
are not essential to the success of the ROTC program. Army ROTC 
is now located in Rockwell Library and will not move off campus as 
they feel they are "simply another campus organization." 




Identification of speakers as they are heard: 



FRIDAY, May 1st. 

Mark Heil, WKNT Newsman 

"The 4 big main picture windows . . . 
LeRoy Satrom, Kent Mayor 

"I am distressed and appauled ... 

SATURDAY, May 2nd, 

Bob Carpenter, WKNT News Director 

■■At this minute the building . 
Walter Moore, Chief of Portage County Sheriffs 

■■Ladies and gentlemen I suggest . . . 
Carpenter 

"The building just fell in . . 
Col. Arthur W. Dodson, Prof, of Military Science (ROTC) 

"Well I think it's the most senseless . . 
Carpenter 

■'Generals Canterbury and Del Corso . . 
lohn P. Smith, Dir. KSU Radio/TV Information 

■The campus at KSU is relatively calm . . . 
3r. Robert I. White, President of KSU 

■■The university's position has . . . 

lUNDAY, May 3rd. 
iMorning) 

ames A. Rhodes, Ohio Governor 

"We've seen here . . . 
eRoy Satrom, Kent Mayor 

"We'll take all necessary action . . . 

oi. Robert Chiaramonte, Supt. of Ohio State Patrol 

■■Well, we're a mobile . , . 
oy Thompson, Kent Police Chief 

"We're going of course to be . . . 

en. S. T. Del Corso, Adjutant Gen. Ohio National Guard 

■'Well, I don't know about . . . 
atrom 

"At this time we do not have . . : 
al Corso 

■■| would estimate roughly . . . 
.1 Newsman 

■■General Del Corso, how long , . . 
hodes 

■■I'll answer that . . . 
9l Corso 

■You've got me outranked . . . 

ivening) 

arpenter 

"The students are now . . . 

PI Guardsman on bullhorn 

■Attention all Kent State students . . . 
-arpenter 

■Right above me . . . 
ohn P. Smith 

■'Orders to break any outdoor. 

^.lONDAY, May 4th, 

Noon chimes , , , Obvious sounds prior, during and after shootings 
V'ith student comments , , , 
Dr. Seymour H. Baron, Chm'n & Prof, of Psychology 

"Leave them alone , 
James Croocker, Graduate student 

"I recommend that students . , . 
Dr. Baron 

"I spoke to the general , . , 
Steve Sharoff, Graduate student 

"They just called me down . . . 
U/l Guard Officer 

"I don't know exactly where . . 
General Robert Canterbury, Adj Gen of Ohio Nat's Guard 

"they've been told to go 
Dr Baron 

"Please, Don't let anyone . . . 
Dr Glenn W Frank, Prof of Geology 

"I don't care whether you've . . . 



OUDSI^ OF mjUNCTION 



Kcviscd Code, Sec. 2727.02- .03- .05.08 



THE STATE OF OHIO, 
??.r.t.age County. 



Court of Common Pleas of eaid County 



STATE OP OHIO, EX REL. 

■■iia^r(X)""oi^""TRffS"TEEs"oF 



KS^Ti 



;tate university 



j\ro. 



39343 



«• phtntiS—\ To ihc said Defendant.?:. 

MICI-I?.EL VffiEKLSy and "JOHN , „• ^ , „ , , 

■EHDE'i-N^jyjSERS-l-— 500 ^"l .-.-MichaeJ.. Week;R:/..3a(a...';j.Qhn..j:).0S.'.'.. 



Numbers 1-500 



Defendant-?-' 

By an order of this Court made this.. 



2nd 



.day of Msy. A. D. 19..7.9.. 



as appears by the J ouTTial of said Court, yon arc enjoined front. .^L'r.?}^.^J}3...^J}y'. 

windows, defacing any buildings with paint, starting any fires on 
cnrapui^ and damaging or destroying any property owned by said university 



until Die further order of the Court. 

WITNESS my signature and the seal «f said Court this 
2nd rt^j/^^ r.ay J9.:'.9... 

C. ■..-.FY THIS TO BI" A TRUE COPY 1 r D (V ^ c ^''^^ ^>x Clerk 

)? TKZ ORIGI-TAL WRIT WITH THE"! ^..-^■cU...UV^.::^r..^.>:>«, Cle?k 

NDOfvSiiH ^:i\'io THEREON. J^ , JDeputy 

JOSEPH C. HECT^DUS, Sheriff ' 

„ --"I ■ .' '.'...■' . '■■■. ' 

Bv ■ '.:... 





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may 3/35 




may 3/36 




may 3/37 




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"I have an 11 o'clock class In the Education 
Building . . . after that time. I have a 12 o'clock 
class, which is around this side complex, so I 
had to cross the campus and I went the usual 
way and found I couldn't get across campus 
because the guards were blocking the campus 
across the Commons." 

/Special Report-The President's Commission on 
Campus Unrest 



may 4/40 





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lii^ijejiaasts. 




' rtHil'li^flnl III ill ti'' ' ' • ^ 






may 4/43 




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may 4/47 



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may 4/48 




may 4/51 




may 4/52 







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11 



12 



13 



1. Joseph Lewis, Jr. 
wounded 

2. John R. Cleary 
wounded 

3. Jeffrey Glenn Miller 
deceased 

4. Dean R. Kahler 
wounded 

5. Douglas Alan Wrentmore 
wounded 

This map of the Kent State campus shows the firing area, near 
the pagoda, and the location of all the casualties at the time they 
were hit. For reference, casualties No. 1 and 13 are each about 
20 yards from the firing line, and casualty No. 11 is 245 to 250 
yards away. 



6. Allen Michael Canfora 
wounded 

7. Allison B. Krause 
deceased 

8. William K. Schroeder 
deceased 

9. Sandra Lee Scheuer 
deceased 



10. James Dennis Russell 
wounded 

Donald Scott MacKenzie 
wounded 
Robert F. Stamps 
wounded 
Thomas M. Grace 
wounded 




Jerry M. Lewis 




Robert H. Canterbury 





Sylveiter T. OolCorso 





Meyer Alewitz 



Leroy Satrom 



William F. Scranton 






I f: il 



111 r '' 



mm 

Mm 



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, . „ COMMISSWK 
' « OX K.8.U. 
VIOLEi^CE 

m UKAUniORIZEl) 
ADMISSION 

l>H0KEV^7935 







fifi 





president whlte/68 



White— Schedule for November 12, 1970 
— S. Gambaccini 

5:30— Staff member on a personal session of his 

6:00— At office 

7:00— Dr. Roskens on Communications 

8:00— Briefing session daily 

9:00— Vice-President and Provost Hall 
10:00- 

11:00— Athletic Director Lude 
12:00— Lunch— Dr. Nurmi— Chairman— Faculty Senate 

2:30-WKSU taping 

3:30-Dr, Jefferson Ware 

4:00— Thom Dickerson 

4:30— Change clothes, pack bag. gas up car, etc 

5:30— Dinner with members of Board of Trustees and 
Student members of Roundtable at Tvnin Lakes 

8:00— Leave for Columbus 
10:30— Meet other State University presidents 
Midnight— Turn in 




itf^^if'?^i^1frt^;i?*" "'>'i'5' 








the pre/idency i/ nouj totally con/i 
unending confl/cotion of oil time and tha 



In 1963 President Robert I. White became the sixth man to fill 
this office at Kent State. In 1945, he received his Doctorate and 
one year later became Dean of the College of Education Vice 
President for Academic Affairs was his next office. This he held 
for nine years until he accepted the presidency. In the following 
eight years, his 10-to-1 8-hour day, 5-to-7-day week schedule 



produced policies, innovations and problems. Student government 
was both powerful and weak, beer and visitation bills were passed, 
chairmen of departments went in and out of appointments, the 
Board of Trustees made decisions. Music and Speech became 
a "boxing arena," buildings were dedicated, and May 4 postponed 



his retirement announcement All, from pride to confrontation, 
showed in the countenance of Robert I White. On February 18, 
1971 he announced his resignation effective September 15. He 
turns to a six month sabbatical leave, a teaching assignment and 
a quieter existence. 





-f?'* 




ifning and ho/ been for /ome time, it/ 
gilt de/troy/ iiome ond per/onol life 



Located 14 miles from the Ken. 
campus, the 526 acres of Blos- 
som Center combine the efforts 
of the Musical Arts Association 
and Kent State to correlate 
three programs. Blossom Fes- 
tival School, Blossom-Kent Art 
Program, and KSU Repertory 
Theater, musicians and visual 
artists. 




blossom centef/74 










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blossom center/ 75 




Rockwell Library, now ROTC, regis- 
trar's, picture taking, ID retrieving, and 
art classes. Catalogued books replaced 
by alphabetical files. No longer- 
"Smoking— only in Smoking rooms." 
Old signs moved, new signs created; 
a catch-all of offices, personnel and 
services that once had no place to go 
new faces, information and emp- 
tyness. 



rockwell iiDrary/76 




army 
rote 




rockwell library 77 




A guard at the door, faces at checkout 
and information desks, and bewildered 
expressions . . . the new library. Escala- 
tors and elevators to reach all twelve 
stories. Self-guided tours for those who 
come to look; bound knowledge and 
study areas for those who search; and 
conference rooms for those who talk 
and play. 




new lJbrary/78 





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Ground breaking occurred almost four years 
ago for tfie University Center. Costing 12 5 mil- 
lion dollars, the L-shaped structure will contain 
6 acres of floor space Its expected completion 
date is Summer or Fall of 1972, On the first floor 
will be a lobby, art gallery, large snackbar. Food 
Sen/ice center and offices of Alumni Relations. 
The second floor will include all major Student 
Activities Offices,- a music room, browsing li- 
brary, ticket office, duplicating service, ala-carte 
dining room, multi-purpose ballroom and meet- 
ing rooms of varied sizes Also a "Viva" area 
will be built, housing a conference theater and 
commuter area. Five years ago, students began 
paying five dollars more through fees to cover 
the cost of construction, and it is expected that 
this will continue tor 40 years, when the cost 
of the center will be completely covered 



The Union is an ancient structure with many 
faces. It has undergone changes through the 
years such as carpeting in the "Hub," the in- 
novation of the RAP, and a student beer bar. 
During the day, commuters can lounge next to 
vending machines. The University Bookstore is 
the scene of long exasperating lines at the 
beginning and end of each quarter. At night, 
the second floor meeting rooms are used by 
honoraries and service groups, while the RAP 
turns on its neon lights and opens for business. 
In winter, students huddle under heat lamps 
outside under the "tent", or in the spring sit 
in the grass Anyone can get cigarettes, beer, 
candy, food, or just away from noise or into it 
at the Union. 





the union'81 




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regis(ration/87] 



The size of the award granted to a student under the Work Study Program is based on 
need They must prove their need for financial aid through a Parents Confidential Statement 
or a Married Students' Budget. If qualified, a job is guaranteed for 10 hours a week minimum 
to 15 hours a week maximum The salary received is funded from two sources: 80% of 
the check comes from the Federal Government and 20% from the university department 
where the student is employed. Work Study places over 450 students in a variety of jobs 
which include animal care in the Psychology Department, laundry in HPE. shelving books 
in the library, and filing, typing, and clerical work in almost any department on campus 
Many have requested aid under Work Study, but funds are limited. An attempt to begin 
an off-campus program is also limited by funds, but Operation Positive, a summer program 
in Canton, has succeeded m opening the door. 





This year the Department of Nursing moved 
to its new location in the old health center. Bus 
transportation is provided for the 500 students 
as the program concentrates on increasing the 
students' amount of time at Mount Sinai, Saint 
Luke's, Highland and Brecksville Hospitals. 
During their last year, student nurses spend, 
one quarter at public hospitals and visit homes, 
one working in psychiatry and rehabilitation 
services, comprehending long term cases, and 
the third learning leadership skills. 



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social workers/93 




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Five black community leaders from Akron each with an understanding of black life and the ability to 
communicate it were hired to begin the Akron Neighborhood Faculty Program in the summer of 1969 
The curnculum they developed is called "The Black Experience." Thirty students each quarter spend 
thirty hours every week "living-in" welfare homes, action centers and the streets of Akron Students 
smell, hear and touch education, by interaction with black administrators, militants, artists mothers 
prostitutes and addicts. Last year, over 450 situations were experienced by students who become aware 
of the "total, black urban world." "The Black Experience" avoids external good-doing and pacifism 
by the communication and involvement of students within the community. Both the university and the 
community have gained; ideas and action flow freely between them The Akron Neighborhood Faculty 
Program is an attempt, and as one student said, "I think we can do it " 



p/ychology : tot a 




monkey/. pigeon/ 





greenhouse/98 



\ 



li 




Why a gr&enhouse? For botany majors because you can't learn botany without growing 
something? . . (or everyone, because just past the long corridor are pinto beans, azaleas, 
pansys, Madagascar Periwinkles, a cactus cone in bloom, and even a Pracaena iragrans 
massangenana Enter the greenhouse, and find a 7d° Africa, with tropical leaves 5 
(eel long. Down the stairs and along the hopping stones, crane lo see the 15 loot 
Papaya tree while bending and stretching under a bridge to enjoy the musky, living 
odor ot vines, feather trees and tropical blossoms. Then up to seven rooms and seedlings, 
plants, bustles and trees from the desert, ocean and woods. For tree, in Cunningham 
Hall 5 greenhouse, anyone can visit the botanical gardens ol Kent. 



lou/e 




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davey warehouse/ 107 




davey warehouse/ 109 



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judo 



Judo— the gentle way 
JU— pliability and gentleness 
DO— expression 
Belts, white, green, brown 
and black. 

Matches begin and end with 
a bow of friendship and 
respect, for the victor and 
the defeated. Judo ... a 
martial art . . . stimulated 
maximum use of mind and 
body with discipline and 
self-control. 



Beginning of a challenge, 
mind against body, 
man against self, 
man against another. 
Losing through impatience, 
winning through alertness 
and prayer. 





|udo/128 












judo/129 



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gymnflttict/130 





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gymnag!IBPl33 




Rudy and Janet present A CIRCUS. Featur- 
ing—aerial acrobatics, vaulting, apparatus 
displays, bumbling clowns, precision rou- 
tines—an old-time show, capped off by a rous- 
ing salute to "God Bless America," all made 
possible by hours of work and the unheralded 
miracles of a few dedicated team physicians. 



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gymna8tiC8/134 






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hell of it. 

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Team ocquirecl 

uniform/ one! 

ujon three gome/. 

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for Rugger/ who 

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of f Idol field. 




ugby/139 



final /core 
iuin/:3;lo//e/i7 




CoQch Rudy Bachna 

with lorge/t /quod 

to date po/ted 

Q 2-7-1 /ea/on 











m, 





soccer 145 



One of KSU's few successful sports 
encountered a "traditional losing 
season," as the wrestlers complied 
a 2-10 record. The grapplers lost to 
every Mid-American Conference 
team, and also fared poorly in the 
MAC tourney championships, win- 
ning two third's and two fourth's. Fin- 
ishing in last place, it was the wres- 
tlers worst tourney showing in seven 
years. Graduation, a transfer, death 
and numerous injuries plagued the 
matmen. As the season ended, so did 
the coaching career of Joe Begala, 
the nation's winningest coach, who 
retired after 42 years as the KSU 
wrestling coach. 





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v/restling/148 




wrestling/149 




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Ice Hockey made its debut at 
KSU in October through the or- 
ganizing of Steve Albert, club 
president. The Clippers' biggest 
problem is raising money for 
uniforms and traveling ex- 
penses. The team can not qual- 
ify for financial assistance from 
the athletic department be- 
cause the club is not an official 
part of the athletic program. 
Each player buys his own 
equipment except for jerseys 
and socks. Disagreement exists 
between the HPE department 
and the Clippers in that the club 
feels ice hockey should be an 
intercollegiate sport. The 
hockey games are broadcast on 
WKSU radio. During their first 
season they won the majority of 
their games. 




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hockey/161 




ice arena/ 162 




The $1.7 million ice arena, with its two rinks, pro shop, snack bar, 
and other features, opened this year. It became a site for dorm and 
organization parties, as well as classes and dates; it is also the home 
of the surprise hockey team, and seats 2,100 people for matches. 
The recreation rink has 1 2,000 sq. feet of space available for skating, 
and both rinks are open to the public as well as students. The 
"Zamboni" ice cleaning machine can scrape and water the surface 
of the recreation rink in about 10 minutes, although 15 minutes more 
is required to refreeze the surface. 







= * 3 t 



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KENT 



THE TR£l U\H 




park)nQjQt8/168 







T STATE UNIVERSITY 



ESTRICTED 
iRKING R-5B 



.Y THROUGH FRIDAY 7AM-5PM 



1 UNIVERSITY IS IN SESSION 



fr- STAFF PERMITS REQUIRED FOR 

■ERED SPACES. 
^ USE METERED SPACES. 

U VEHICLES MAY USE SPECIAL 

-S SO POSTED 

^m MAY NOT PARK IN THIS AREA. 

ALL OTHER TIMES 



IIY-STAFF PERMITS ARE REQUIRED 
FOR THOSE SPACES POSTED AS 
TY-STAFF AT ALL TIMES, 

Lil MAY USE ALL OTHER SPACES AND 



lEAD-IN PARKING ONLY 
■ parking in TRAFFIC LANES. 
'RKED IN' VIOLATION OF REGULATIONS 
UE TO BE TOWED AWAY--RECLAIM AT 
I'TFICE. 



commuters 169 



Liquid Crystals Insitute, object 
of criticism stemming from its 
war-natured research, focuses 
its research on the qualities of 
the crystals. These crystals, an 
integral part of life, are used 
in detection of minute temper- 
ature change; they undergo a 
rapid color shift with slight 
thermal variation. With the aid 
of Federal Grants, KSU gradu- 
ate students and faculty in 
physics and chemistry probe 
the secrets held in the thermal 
qualities of the crystals. Re- 
search with these organic 
compounds may end the mys- 
tery surrounding the growth of 
cancerous and malignant tis- 
sues in the human body. 

liquid crystals by |im hijmmel/170 




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DS.OH067I 1 .2103294PI3 



00 DOB 07/16/40 DOI 00/00/0 
HGT 00 U'GT 000 SSN 210329403 KEY 02329803 
NEV.BURY " OH 00000 
111168 111368 2 2 0000000 1832 
LEFT TURN 




police by )itn hummel /1 71 ', 



The new health center: a much-used outpatient clinic; an 
x-ray room with an automatic processor; a physiotherapy area 
with two whirlpool baths and an ultra-sound machine; 32 beds 
in double rooms; 28 extra, emergency beds seldom used but 
ready to be set up in the hallways. Eight physicians, five 
full-time; one psychiatrist; and numerous nurses work 
through emergencies, like fire drills, where even patients on 
stretchers are to clear the building. Perched on a hill, but 
no longer called "pill hill": the "new" health center. 







TO BE ELtS^ieiE 

FCR SERVICE HERE 
STUDENT FEE CRRD 
MUST SHOW PRYMENT OF 

COMPREHENSIVE FEE 
FOR CURRENT OUflRTER 




new health CQHtaT 173 
















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deaf education /1 75 



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I home ec/176 




Nixson Hall, center of the Home Economics Department, 
classrooms for Home Management, Child Care, Home and 
Family, Consumer Services, Dietetics and Fashion Mer- 
chandising. There 500 students learn, test and experiment 
and train in a live-in "house" called the Home Manage- 
ment Residence. 




students in the Sctiool of Music follow a rigorous and demanding scfiedule at KSU To be 
admitted and recommended in ttieir chosen curriculum, all students must audition in their 
performing medium. The Bachelor of Music curricula in performance, composition, theory and 
sacred music provides the most intensive specialization for music students A second audition 
must be given before entering upper division study as a junior. All performance majors are 
expected to give a senior recital. Applicants in graduate studies are required to take placement 
examinations in the fields of music theory, history and literature In addition, all music majors 
are required to be members of an ensemble each quarter The University Choir, combines with 
the Oratio Guild twice each year for campus performances The KSU Chorale concentrates 
on music of the Baroque and Contemporary periods, while the Opera Workshop emphasizes 
artistic interpretation of roles, emphasizing acquisition of the opera singer's acting technique. 
Ensembles also include Kent's University Band, Varsity Band and Symphony Band, the last 
of which performs on tour throughout the US, and the Select Brass Choir and the Percussion 
Ensemble The best known of the groups is the KSU Lab Band, organized by Walter Watron 
in 1968, and directed by William Robbins. The Lab Band participates in various jazz festivals, 
holds contests on and off campus, and in 1970, was one of four U.S. bands to appear in the 
Fourth International Montreuz Jazz Festival held in Switzerland 




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Crowded Into an Isolated, closet-like office In the 
Psychology Department is Raleigh M. Drake, deve- 
loper of the Drake Musical Aptitude tests. These 
tests measure first, one's ability to note, remember 
and compare melodies, changes in time, key or 
notes; and secondly, one's physical response to 
changes in rhythm and tempo. The test has been 
substantiated as highly reliable, for the subject's 
results cannot be affected by his age, intelligence 
level, sex, or previous training. Research tor the 
construction of the lest culminated at Kent State 
as a result ol 20 years of work In the tields of music 
psychology. Dr. Drake received his Bachelor's and 
Master's Degrees in Psychology from Boston Uni- 
versity and his Doctoral Degree from the University 
of London. A new program In the psychology of 
music brought Dr. Drake to Kent Slate In 1947. 
Before his arrival, he was head of the Psychology 
Department at Mary Washington College at the 
University of Virginia. He Is currently working on 
research in the psychology of musicians and the 
testing of pitch discrimination and chord analysis, 
His future plans include doing work on Ifie Influence 
of environment upon verbal and non-verbal test 
scores and performing crosscullural studies of 
musical talent and intelligence tests. 



Or. Richard 0. Featheringham. listed In Ripley's 
Believe It or Not and In Who's Who. can type 200 
words per minute and take shorthand at 300 words 
per minute. After obtaining his Bachelor's degree 
and doing his Master's work at Kent, Dr. Feath- 
eringham taught high school and college courses. 
He instructed at the University of North Dakota and 
the University of Akron before coming to Kent State 
In 1966, Oddly enough, he chose teaching and not 
secretarial work as a profession. In 1966, Dr. Feath- 
eringham was one of the recorders for Vice- 
President Humphrey when he visited Kent, and used 
his 300 words per minute shorthand lo Its extreme. 
He has been an educational consultant, lecturer and 
speed-typing demonstrator for the Royal Typewriter 
Company since 1965. and has published a dozen 
articles on typing and shorthand for business edu- 
cation periodicals. He has lectured at more than 
100 colleges and universities In the United Stales 
and at national conferences and conventions. Dr. 
Featherham's Interest In typing and shorthand t>egan 
while In high school where he was lorced to take 
both 8Ub|ect8 to get enough credits to graduate. 
He practiced and gained success and currently can 
write three times as fast as the average person 
speaks, and Is 3 seconds short of the world's record 
for typing. Dr. Featheringham and his typewriter are 
located In the Education Building. He Is an associate 
professor of vocational education. 



Even though his topic of study was International 
Relations, Dr. Murray FIshel. an assistant professor 
in the Political Science department at KSU. has his 
main Interest lodged in African Politics. After re- 
ceiving his Bachelor's and Master's Degrees at Kent 
In 1961 and 1963. he taught at Kansas State Univer- 
sity, and the University of Denver where he received 
his Doctorate. He returned to Kent in 1966. and two 
years later was sent lo the University ol Ife in Ibadan, 
Nigeria as a visiting professor. In the summer of 
1970, he was chosen as one of eighteen professors 
sent to Mahere University In Kapala, Uganda, for 
the Regional Council on International Education. 
Problems ol previous equal exchange programs 
were solved through RCIE. Dr. Fisheii's seminars 
and traveling centered on the social and economic 
development of East Africa. He has been asked to 
chair an RCIE panel on the role that African Studies 
plays In the development of Africa and the solution 
of their problems. He feels that many African Studies 
are used to further Americans but not lo solve 
African problems. Dr. FIshel Is currently working 
on an anthology ol African politics (with exclusive 
African sources), which will give American students 
an African perspective. He leels that his greatest 
accomplishment Is "to make at least one student 
think that he ought to participate In poiillcs." 



Located In a "cubby-hole" office In Van Deusen Hall 

is petite, attractive Mary Ann Sheer, a truly great 
lady of design. She achieved international fame by 
being ihe first In the world to create jewelry from 
stainless steel, and combine It with gold, etx)ny and 
gems. After education on a scholarship from the 
Cleveland institute of Art, she began her career as 
an automotive designer tor Ford Motor Company. 
She also designed clothes, packages and lllusira* 
tions for children. Then In 1962, U.S. Steel Corpora- 
tion asked her to create a collection of Items to 
send on a world tour. Showing the beauty of stain- 
less steel, rattier than Its utility, opened up a new 
medium to her. Using a blowtorch and a power saw, 
stK created fragile jewelry that was displayed In 
Czechoslovakia, Chicago and New York, and won 
awards from Ihe Cleveland Museum of Art, the 
Smithsonian Inslltule and Tokyo's International 
Institute of Design. She created an elaborate gold 
rirtg lo present lo the Duke of Windsor, and expen- 
sive items for sale. As a KSU faculty rrtember, she 
teaches students In her metalworking class to create 
steel jewelry. Mrs. Sheer lives In a modified sic 
Oriental house, with Chinese temple door Inserts, 
matching leakwood HImalyan elephants that guard 
the front door, and 3 loot tall chess men resting 
on a 16 loot concrete chess board, beside her pool. 



Clayton Krehbiel, associate professor In th 
School ol Music previously sang in Ihe Ck 
Orchestra Chorus and performed with and c 
the Robert Shaw Chorale. He graduated ir 
University of Kansas In 1 942 and taught high 
for a few years belore auditioning for '. 
chorales in New York. He sang in Robert ' , 
Collegiate Chorale and was cfwsen to be a rr 
ol the Chamber Choir because of his tale' 
background. This choir evolved into the Rober 
Chorale with Krehbiel being assistant con 
during Its lirst year of existence. This w, 
"greatest thing that ever happened" lo hli 
during this time he loured the U.S. with the CI 
and procured his Masters degree at Coli 
Krehbiel left New York in 1949 lo become th 
lessor In charge of all choruses at Ihe Uni 
of Kansas, but continued to record albums w 
Chorale. He toured Russia on concert with the i 
and made four Irips wilh Shaw to South At 
for the U.S. State Department, in South Arr 
he held clinics and master classes on chor^' 
ducting and repatory techniques. In 1965, Kr 
joined Ihe Cleveland Orchestra Chorus, whi 
feels Is "the finest orchestra chorus In the L '■ 
Stales." He came to Kent Slate two years c 
Chairman ol the Vocal Choral Division of Bic 
Music Center's Choruses. Krahblei also hold. < 
school clinics in the United States and Canada- 
conducts choruses In order to "encourage, i-^ 
and Inspire youth to become belter musiclani', 
to lead those who are rwl lo enjoy a luller arJfstIc 
life." 



distinguished faculty by torn petit/ieo 






I </ :l'. f| ■> / i ^ 




jiTounded In his office by models of buses and 
jrrlages. Is the Director ol the OHIce ol Parking 
nd Traflic and Campus Bus Service at KSU. Alth- 
ugh mosi students connect Michael Blurton with 
•e traffic and parking problems at Kent. It Is fact 
^al he Is nationally known tor his activities here 
nd elsewhere. He developed automatic zone fare 
quipment that has been patented and used widely 
I several countries. Earlier, In Britain. Blurlon 
nglneered as a bus and railway apprentice, and 
as a radio electrician In the Royal Navy. He then 
3me to Montreal, Canada, where the Canadian 
3ciric Railway and Sir George Williams University 
rovlded him with experience and education. At the 
niveralty of Illinois, he procurred his Masters and 
octoraledegrees In Transportation Economics and 
orked as Pro|ect Director of HUD Mass Transit 
rojects. His transit work Includes; designing com- 
Jteflied transit management Information with the 
merlcan Transit Association, and designing the 
/Stem and equipment for a "demand-responslve- 
juted" bus service. At Kent, Blurton began au- 
'matlc bus detection and the schedule checking 
ystem tor automatic starting. He devised the display 
lat Informs passengers how many minutes until 
le next bus; displays are located beside Sattertleld 
all and across from the Ice Rink, Along with con- 
ultlng smaller cities on the operation of bus sys- 
^ns. Blurton has achieved merit for his accom- 
llshments. In Alberta. Canada, he received the best 
ctor award at the Dominion Drama Festival and 
rst prize at the Ohio Poets Day. Acquiring bus 
■2345. which was u»ed in the ending scene of "The 
graduate" Is also one of his most pleasing ac- 
ompllshments. 



Dr. Ronald Sommers. chairman of Speech Pathology 
and Audtology at KSU, Is an expert In the rehabilita- 
tion of speech disorders. He got his Bachelor's 
Degree from Kent In 1952, and received his Master's 
from Northwestem and Doctorate from the University 
of Pittsburgh. After serving In the U.S. Navy, he was 
Supervisor of Speech and Hearing at both Armstrong 
and Montgomery County Schools. In 1968, he be- 
came (he Director of the Speech and Hearing Center 
At Temple University In Philadelphia. Only since 
September of 1970 has he been at Kerrt. as a profes- 
sor of speech and chairman of the department. 
Through his research. Dr. Sommers developed the 
"Echorder", a special "Deferred Auditory" feedback 
device used In speech and language training In the 
U.S. and throughout the world. This machine Is 
especially useful In therapy of children who have 
speech disorders t>ecause It automatically allows 
lor ttw instant replay of previously spoken recorded 
material. Unlike ordinary tape recorders, the 
"Echorder" does not need rewinding which would 
lose the attention of a child. The device stores 
material tor future replay: It has time delays of 3. 
4, 6, and 12 seconds. He Is currently working on 
a modification ol the "Echorder" which will have 
shorter time delays for use In stuttering therapy. 
Dr. Sommers has been a consultant to the Bureau 
lor Education of the Handicapped and the National 
Institute of Health. Currently h>e Is working through 
the bureau as a consultant with Utah State University 
lo develop a new type of specialist to work with 
the hard of hearing child. TTiese specialists, called 
Educational Audlologlsts, will be trained through 
specialized curriculum. Dr. Sommers plans to hold 
a lecture "Telethon" long distance to majors In this 
field at Utah State. He hopes to write part ol a book 
on the Concept of Educational Audlology as part 
of a school seHlng. His future plans Include a study 
with school children to find the most superior 
method of therapy, and plans to write "the Parent 
and ihe Speech Therapy Process," a book on the 
subject of most of his major experimentation. All 
ol these accomplishments lead to Or. Sommer's 
main goal in life: "To demonstrate that quality 
research wHhln the school environment Is Indeed 
possible." 



Since his founding of the Liquid Crystal Institute 
In 1965, Dr. Glenn Brown's national fame has risen. 
He received his Bachelors Degree from Ohio Uni- 
versity and Doctorate from Iowa State University. 
He taught at the University of Mississippi, Iowa State 
University and Ihe University of Vermont, before 
Joining the KSU faculty In 1960. As a member of 
the chemistry department, he was dean ol research, 
chairman ol the department and selected Regents' 
Professor of Chemistry, In 1966 he was chosen 
"Most Honored Faculty Memt>er" and received Ihe 
Distinguished Service Award from the Ohio Academy 
of Science, Dr. Brown was the chairman of the 
International Conferences on liquid crystals which 
were held at Kent In 1965 and 196B and now Is the 
1970-1971 lecturer for the Society of Sigma Xi, 
national science society. He has two patents as a 
result of his research, and has authored and edited 
six traoks. His numerous papers that are Included 
In scientific Journals cover topics which range from 
polarography and liquid dielectrics, to the viscosity 
of solutions and pholechromlsm. He Is currently 
co-edllor of the "Journal of Molecular Crystals and 
Liquid Crystals." 



Rose Volmelker In the Library Science department 
Insists that she's "at least 150 years old." Through 
these years she has acquired respect and fame lor 
numerous accomplishments. The two Ihat have 
given her the greatest personal satisfaction have 
been the organization of ti>e Business Information 
Department of the Cleveland Public Library and the 
reorganization of the Cleveland Plain Dealer news 
library. She started as a library page In Cleveland 
and attended Case Western Reserve where she 
obtained herilbrarycertlflcatein 1918. After working 
In Detroit and Cleveland. While Motor Company 
asked her to t}egln a library to organize business 
references as a service for their executive staff. This 
Idea was continued, and two and a half years later. 
Mrs. Volmelker began the Business Information 
Department of the Cleveland Public Library as a 
service to the entire city. This was the first "business 
library within a library " to be started In the country; 
ottiers had attempted It on a branch system. Both 
current business resources as well as scholarly 
references were kept so business could use past 
history to guide their current ventures. With quiet 
voice and a penetrating memory, she recalls her 
26 years of Interesting experiences In business 
information which ranged from receiving a quarter 
of a century certificate to finding a hospital patient's 
lost twolher. Even though Mrs. Volmelker had never 
worked with a newspaper, her nexl accomplishment 
was the complete revamping of Ihe Cleveland Plain 
Dealer newsr>aper library. The paper had split Into 
two locations and It was her Job to serve two depart- 
ments, two staffs and the newspaper's radio stations 
with one "clipping and picture" library. In 1963 she 
was Invited to teach graduate studies In Library 
Science at Kent State. She believes students to t>e 
"most exhilarating, earnest, sincere, vital, alive and 
concerned with the world and Its future." She has 
published pamphlets, a directory of local community 
research resources and Is currently writing 4 books. 
One of these called "It Happened In a Library" Is 
aimed at tier goal In life; "To get the wortd lo know 
what a library really Is and what II can do for 
everyone." 



Hallm Ei-Dabh Is internationally known as a com- 
poser and an ethnomuslcologist. As a specialist In 
African music he has collected folk music In Africa 
and performs on many of the native Instruments, 
notably the dmms. His music blends elements of 
Africa with that of the West. When collecting music 
he lives right In the villages with the native peoples. 
and adopts their customs and life styles. He learns 
and records their music, and Instills In them a sense 
of pride In their musical heritage, Ei-Dabh, who was 
bom In Cairo, became Interested In the music ol 
his people wtwn he was young. He has received 
two Guggenheim fellowships for composition and 
a Rockefeller fellowship for work In Africa. He holds 
degrees from Cairo University. New England Con- 
servatory ol Music and Bradels University, Because 
of his musical background he has served as his 
nabve country's chief music advisor and consultant 
to the ministry of culture. He has worked in conjunc- 
tion with Irving Rn ar>d Aaron Copland at the Berk- 
shire Music Center. His first major success came 
when his dance epk; "Ciytemnestra" was commis- 
sioned by Martha Graham and pertormed by her 
dance company for the first time on April 1, 1958 
at the AdelphI Theatre In New York. Ei-Dabh came 
to Kent In the fall of '69 from Howard University 
In Washington. He has helped develop Ihe doctoral 
program here at Kent. He Is Involved In work wHh 
Ihe black community in the Sketio and McElrath Parft 
area. Several times he has taken his students along 
with him to work with children and parents using 
music to enrich their lives and to help them twlter 
understand their cultural heritage. At Kent he Is 
attempting to set up a program where-by a group 
of students will be able to spend a quarter In Africa 
living In one of the villages. 



distinguished taculty/18l 




Dr. Gerald Read has been called ■KSU's unoHtcIa) 
ambassador abroad, as he is an tntemallonatly 
known authority on comparative education. He has 
administered 40 overseas seminars involving over 
2.000 educators. As consultant to the Slate Depart- 
ment In overseas education, he directed field studies 
In the Soviet Union and Outer Mongolia. As a faculty 
member in the Secondary Education Department at 
Kent since 1943. he has received many awards (or 
his achievements. In 1969, he t)ecame the first 
person to receive the Kent Presidents' Medal for 
"loyalty and perennially bringing renoun to the 
university.' He graduated magna cum laude from 
Kent, and received his Masters and Doctorate 
degrees from Ohio State. In 1969. Dr. Read was 
selected head of a seminar on educational reforms 
In France. England, Germany and Sweden. He has 
been a visiting research scholar at the Unlverstty 
of London and was Vice Chancellor of the Interna- 
tional Education Academy at the University of Ham- 
burg, Germany, His love of International and com- 
parative education has taken him to dozens of 
foreign countries. Including Japan, Korea, and 
others In South America arid Europe as both lecturer 
and speaker. 



Dr, August MeJef Is Kent Stale's third faculty member 
to be named Unlverstty Professor, the highest KSU 
rank a professor can receive. One of the nation's 
foremost specialists in black history and race rela- 
tions, he received his B.A. from Obertin College in 
1945. and later his M.A. and Ph,D, from Columbia 
University, In 1968 he participated in conferences 
encouraging research in Afro-American Studies, 
sponsored by the American Association of University 
Presses, At the same time he worked on the deve- 
lopment of new guidelines for the Afro-American 
Studies sponsored by the Social Science Research 
Council, In 1960 he was president of the Baltimore 
Chapter ot Americans for Democratic Action, and 
was a member of the ADA'S National Board and 
National Executive Committee, As a consultant to 
the National Commission on the Cause and Preven- 
tion of Violence he worked closely with Or. MItton 
Eisenhower, and with the National Advisory Council 
on Civil Disorders headed by Governor Otto Kerner 
of Itllnois- Doctor Meier is vridely published. His first 
book, Negro Thought in America. 1880-1915. Is now 
considered a classic reference in the black history 
field. He was general editor tor the Alheneum Pub- 
lishers "Negro in American Life. " which now In- 
cludes original hardback monographs and over 16 
paperbacks. He has written over 60 articles In the 
field of black history and race relations and Is on 
the editorial board of Booker T. Washlngtor} Papers, 
Integrated Education: CMI War History and Social 
Science Quarterly His plans Include further re- 
search and publications. Dr Meier should not be 
considered an Ivory lower recluse, however, tor his 
actions do justice to academic pursuits. He was 
secretary for the Newark, New Jersey branch of the 
NAACP In 1951-1952; adviser of the Baltimore Civic 
Interest Group, an adult affiliate ol SNCC, and twice 
arrested for activities connected with the civil rights 
movement. 



Elmer L. Novolny, chairman of the School of Art, 
has been at KSU since 1938, He Is noted lor art 
instruction and for portrait painting, Hehas had more 
than 20 "one man shows" in New Vork, Boston, 
Los Angeles and Cleveland. After receiving his 
diploma at the Cleveland School ot Art In 1930, 
Novotny worked on special studies at the University 
of London, the Academy of Zagrek In Yugoslavia 
and Yale University. He received his Bachelor's 
Degree at Western Reserve and his Master's at Kent. 
In 1965 he gained recognition as an honored faculty 
member here at Kent. During the summers from 
1936-1948, he was a visiting artist al the Cleveland 
Institute of Art. His areas in painting Include portrai- 
ture, water color, oil, polymer and mural painting. 
One ot his oils Is in the Cleveland Museum of Art, 
others hang In the Municipal Collection of Cleveland 
and the W. C, Coll Butler Institute of American Art- 
Much of Novolny's work Is located In private art 
collections through out the United States and 
Europe. 



Ruth Laredo Is an Internationally famous concert 
planlstoriginaiiy Irom Detroit, Michigan. She studies 
at ttie Curtis Institute In Philadelphia with Rudolph 
Serkln and Mieczyslow Horszowskl. As a recllallsl 
she has pertormed throughout the United States, 
and as a soloist through Europe and the Mid-East 
with such major orchestras as the Detroit Symphony, 
the Philadelphia Orchestra, the American Symphony 
Orchestra and the MarltKiro Music Festival Orches- 
tra. Her first recording, the Bach "Triple Concerto," 
was made wHh pianists Rudolph Serkln and Miec- 
zyslow Horszowskl and with the Uaritwro Orchestra. 
She has also taped several piano recitals for the 
educational television seriestltled "Young American 
Musicians." Her husband, Jaime Laredo, rose to 
International prominence as a violinist when he won 
the coveted Queen Eiizatieth of Belgium Competition 
In 1959. Born in Bolivia, he came to the United States 
when quite young. He currently studies with Antonio 
de Grassl and other famous musicians. He gave his 
first public pertormance at the age ol eight In which 
he pertormed a full recital including a pertormance 
ol "Mendelsohn's Violin Concerto" In Sacramento, 
California. Laredo, a graduate from Curtis Inslllule, 
has appeared with virtually every major orchestra 
)n tf>e United States, Canada, Europe, and South 
America, His extensive list of recordings have also 
won him high acclaim throughout the world. The 
Laredo's mel and married as students at the Curtis 
Institute. Though they both have active solo careers 
Ihey are now launching a career In joint recitals 
and orchestral engagements. They have appeared 
tor trath public and private pertormances, Including 
an evening al the White House. The Laredo's Joined 
the music laculty at Kent Slate In 1968. They have 
a rattier unusual arrangement at Kent State whereby 
Ihey only commute from Ihetr home In Manhattan 
to Kent once a week to conduct private lessons 
called "Applied Lessons." Laredo also serves as 
Bolivia's cultural spokesman to the United Nations 
even though he now permanently resides In New 
York. Their home Is a galt>ering place for many of 
the best known musicians In the world Including 
Serkln. Casals, Schneider and others. 



History Is "a giide lor our own times" and 
driving force for Dr, Lawrence Kaplan, professc 
history at K,S.U. He received his Bachelor's de. 
from Colby College and his Master's and Doctci 
from Yale University. From 1951-54 he serve--, 
a historian In the Department ot Defense. His d- 
to teach brougtit him to Kent State. His two sp- 
interests: the Age ot Jefferson and NATO, ea 
him publlcalion honors and trips abroad. He 
a Fulbhght Lecturer in American History at 
Universities of Bonn and Louvain, and In Poll 
Science at the University ot Nice. During 196' 
on a travel grant from the American Phliosopi 
Society, he was visiting scholar al the Unive. 
ol London. He has published eight works on N/ 
two books on American diplomacy, and Is plan) 
a future project on the American rote In NA~ 
origins. Dr, Kaplan believes in his subject 
received the Alumni Award lor Disllnguir 
Teaching Irom Kent State In 1967. He believes 
"the study of history can otter a perspective w. 
can put contemporary problems In their approp^ 
place." 



distinguished faculty/ 182 




ilenn W, Frank teels that ■it's very Important to get Involved. " He 
ersonally has been Involved: In geology, as an Assistant Chairman 
t the Geology department; In the nation, by receiving numerous 
nations and av^ards for his work: and In the university, by being 
edicated. Involved and outspoken. He spoke out In tall against a 
ourt Injunction because as he says. "I did what t though! was 
3a8onable, and II everyone did what he thought was reasonable, 
iiaybe things would be changed." Frank has been with the Geology 
epartment al KSU since Its beginning, Irom undergraduate school 
J lull prolessorshlp, with the exception ol only 3 years. He published 
le Ohio Intercollegiate Field Trip Guide, which Is used nationally 
3 a study guide lor Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. 
le served as President of the American Institute ol Proleaslonal 
eologlsts and as a member ol the International Oceanographlc 
oundatlon. In education Frank leels that his -malor protect Is the 
'udent," He Is concerned with university students and pleased with 
le successlulness ol past students, proud that he had Instructed 
lem. In 1970 he was named to Outstanding Educators ol America 
nd to Creative and Successlul Personalities ot the World. Franks 
heart Is In Kent and will continue to be Involved and help keep 
enl a fine educational Institution ' He says he has a great love 
■r the university and does not leel that he deserves national prestige, 
e was surprised at recently receiving full prolessorshlp. He Is active 
3 a Boy Scout Scoutmaster and served on the University Presidential 
ommlaslon on Unrest. "I Just do what I think everyone ought to 
3 doing." and to Glenn Frank, this la concern and Involvement. 



Joe Begala ... his name Is synonymous with wrestling; hia 
reputation Is synonymous with winning. He Is supreme In college 
wrestling circles. For 42 years he has been the king of college 
grappling coaches. He ts retiring (his season with more wins 
than any college wrestling coach In America, No one coach has 
been able to match his record ol total wins, and since 1961 
he has been the winnlngest coach In the country. He has dedi- 
cated his Hie to winning and to Kent Slate University. Since 
coming here he t^as given both his total being. He attended Ohio 
University, where as a member ol the Bobcat wrestling team 
he helped to build a solid vn-estllng program. Begala graduated 
Irom O.U In 1929 and waa Immediately ottered a job as wreatling 
coach at Kent State. That year he look over the wrestling team 
and started to lay the loundatlon lor (he most successful program 
In the country. Wrestling wasn't his only bag. however. While 
al Kent. Begala has coached football, golf, track, tennis and cross 
country, and was successlul in all. But wrestling was his first 
love and he dedicated most of his lime lo that love. He turned 
young men Into winners txillding their character along the way. 
Begala has turned out over 200 Individual champions. Including 
13 NCAA place-winners and 42 MAC champions. He rolled up 
300 victories during his career, the 300th coming last season. 
His teams have only lost 69 matches throughout the years. 
Despite hla winning attitude Begala never forgot to Infuse the 
Idea ol fun Into the sport. He has said, 'We will wrestle anyone 
at any time and place, and at the same time we will have tun. 
When the time comes that It ceases lo be tun lor a boy to wrestle, 
he Is out," His fame as a coach has won him many honors, 
Including Induction Into the Helms National Hall ol Fame, the 
Ohio University Hall ol Fame and the Ohio High School Coaches 
Association Hall ol Fame. AHer 42 years of winning Joe Begala 
stepped down , . . but not as a qulller. He scoHs at those who 
aald that he was quitting because of thia year's poor seaaon. 
"No," said Joe, "I'm not quitting. Forty-two years Is long enough." 



James P. OeMarco Is an Interested professor "who will listen 
to a student's Ideas and probtema." He la also the first male 
faculty member In the School of Nursing at KSU. DeMarco 
became nationally recognized lor his work at Children's Hospital 
In Akron through the development ol the HospHal Information 
System. This system uses electronic computers to automatically 
process clerical data on patient's personal records and the 
physician's Instructions concerning hla treatment. This allowa 
the nurse to devote more lime to the pallenfs needs. The nurse 
merely codes the necessary Information Into the computer which 
adds to a permanent. Immediately available llle DeUarco served 
seven-and-one-half years In the Army as a second lieutenant 
belore moving lo Ctilldren's Hospital, where he spent the next 
thirteen years. He left the position of Assistant Administrator 
of Nursing at the hoapltal to assume the responsibilities ol 
Assistant Prolessor of Nursing at Kent State. DeMarco has 
published articles on his profession In various medical journala. 
and has filled speaking engagements lor txtth the American 
Hospital Association and the American Management Association. 
He Is locally known lor his work on the Battered-Child Syndrome. 



Dr. Phillip K. Tompklna la an expert In the area ol organization 
communication. During the summers ol 1967-68 he was chosen 
to be a communlcallon consullant to Dr. Wernker von Braun 
at the Marshall Space Flight Center. He became the llrst summer 
faculty consultant ever called In to deal In a non-sclentlfic aspect 
of the space program. While working In connection with Werner 
von Braun they revamped all ot the communication schemes 
within the Saturn V and Apollo syatems. One ol the new philoso- 
phies Dr. Tompkins helF>ed develop waa called "automatic re- 
sponse," where all personnel are held responsible for the cor- 
rection ol any error they might Bee. It has proven very atlectlve. 
Before becoming a consultant he received hla Bachelor'a Degree 
Irom Colorado Stale In Speech and Political Science, and ac- 
quired hla Masler'a al the University of Nebraska while a detiate 
coach at the Unlveralty of Kanaaa. In 1962 he received his 
Doctorate from Purdue and became an assistant prolessor of 
communications there. He went on lo Wayne Stale and llnally 
came lo Kent as a full professor In Ihe Department ol Rheloric 
and Communication. Next tall he will leave to become chairman 
of thai department at State University In Albany, New York. 
Tompkins has done work with colleges concerning communica- 
tions problems. Including extensive research on the Kent State 
campus. President White appointed him to the Kegley Commis- 
sion after May 4, lor the purpose of looking at communications 
within the university. He became chairman of this task force 
on communications and conducted 500 In depth Interviews with 
administrators, faculty, students, and city adminlstratora. He then 
complied two lengthy reports and submitted them lo the PresI* 
dent, but ao tar his suggestions have not been Implemented. 
He Is presently working on a traok tilled, Communlcallon Crisis 
Al Kent State: A Case Study which should be released In the 
spring of this year. Hla book Is highly critical ol Ihe present 
administration. He realizes that the university la really too large. 
"People should gel over lalse notions that largeness Is a sign 
ol quality because It Isn't necesaarlly true, " says Dr. Tompkins; 
"organizations retard growth rather than promote II." 



distinguished tacuity/ISS 



PLEASE qI 
■ COUNTS 





Eating off campus? You have 
your choice of delicacies; 204 
hamburgers, pancakes, pastries, 
or spending 25 dollars tor dinner 
and drinks for two. Restaurants 
turn into bars, corner hamburger 
stands change hands and food 
stuffs, and 11 pizzanas deliver it 
hot, cold or not at all You can 
go north to Streetsboro, south to 
the Holiday Inn, east to East Park 
or west to the Stow-Keni Plaza, 
to satisfy your constant hunger. 



eating places/ 185 




downtown/186 



I 





downtown/ 190 




STUDENT RENTALS 



All students under 21 or withol senior status must live In approved housing at 
KSU. Men and women student complexes are both approved and unapproved and 
can house eight for $17 each and up to ten at $14 per week, while private homes 
rent rooms (rom $125 to $150 per quarter. One ol the requirements lor approved 
housing Is that It should provide each student with 1 chair, 1 closet. 1 chesi of 
drawers, and "1 bed with a clean level mattress, and a lock on the student's room 
door (it requested). " However, conditions are often not as good as this One tenant 
said he was promised lurniture tor tall quarter and did not receive it until the following 
winter quArter. Students also have problems ol unfair leases, and getting deposits 
back when they move Irom both approved and unapproved housing. KSU has no 
conlrols, except to give legal advice, lor the university does not have the man-power 
to Investigate and the city ol Kent Is out ol their jurisdiction. Rent strikes have 
resulted, as students attempt to gain lower rates and improvements, but rental agents 
lose tt>eir jobs and tenants are given 3 days notice by registered mall to leave, 
followed by legal action it the tenant reluses. Kent cilizens complain of parked 
cars and piled garbage in yards and as students refuse to pay rent police are called 
to Investigate for drugs and noise. (However, if students wish to pay for "comfortable" 
living, there is always Glenmorris. at S210 per quarter with swimming pool privileges. 
College Towers costing $180 per month, and Silver Oaks Apartments on Horning 
Road for $135-$175 a month 



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7 



Directory 



A 

Abej. Claire 324 

Aborcrombie. Nancy 294 

Abrahamsen, Thomas 324 

Abrams, Roger 324 

Ackerman, Bruce 2&I 

Adams, Anita 324 

Adams. Beverly 324 

Adams, Karen 324 

Adams, Marcla 324 

Adams, Nancy 324 

Adams, William 324 

Addams. Christine 324 

Addis, Patricia 324 

Addwei. Rocco 324 

Adkins, Gary 324 

Aguilar, Maryann 324 

Ahrens. Judith 324 

Alton, Deborah 324 

Akers, Terry 324 

Akiba, Margie 29?, 324 

Alcorn, Constance . .■ 324 

Alderman, John 324 

Alderman, Martin '^. 324 

AIek, Karen 324 

Alexander, Janine 305 

Alexander, Joan 324 

Alexander, Linda 287, 314, 324 

Alexander, Richard 305 

Alexis, Thomas 324 

Algieri. Michael 324 

Allan, Griff 304 

Allen, Joyce 324 

Allen, Kenneth 324 

Allen, Mary 324 

Allyn, Hall , 208 

Almy, Burt 324 

Alonso De Mier, Calrxto 324 

Alpha Chi Omega 284, 2B5 

Alpha Eta Rho 239 

Alpha Gamma Delta 283 

Alpha Kappa Alpha 290 

Alpha Lambda Delta 237 

Alpha Phi 284, 287 

Alpha Phi Omega 238 

Alpha Tau Omega , 300, 301 

Alpha Xi Delta 288, 289 

Alstedt, Constance 283, 324 

Alterkruse, David 279 

Altieri, James 324 

Altmann, Hall 207 

Amatangelo, John 256, 324 

Ambrose, Judith 281 

Ambrose, Richard , 324 

Amer. Ind, Arts Assn 239 

Amer. Inst, of Aero, and Astro 241 

Ames, Pamela 324 

Amrcone, Anthony 324 

Amster, Victor /...,..:. 281 

Anderla, Fran 324 

Anderson. Bette 324 

Anderson, Dr. Dorcas 245 

Anderson, Janet 250 

Anderson, Linda 324 

Anderson, Patricia , 324 

Anderson. Robert 3I9 

Anderson, Ronnie 324 

Andras, Ronald 324 



Andres, Anthony 300 

Andrews, Blair - 322 

Andrzejewski, Robert 280, 324 

Angel Flight & Arnold Air Society ....240, 241 

Anqelo, John 245 

Angert, Patrick 308 

Anglin, Mary 324 

Angros, Jan© 324 

Ankenbruck, Barbara 294 

Ankenbruck, Susan 294 

Anthony, Georgia 324 

Anthony. Paul 3(5 

Anthony, Mark 259 

Antonelll, Michael 324 

Antos, Ken 30£ 

Apel, Beverly /. .325 

Applegate, Barbara 325 

Arbaugh, Ronald 280 

Ardhy, Saleh 259 

Argo, Robert 325 

Argulewici. Pia 325 

Arhutich, Joseph 325 

Arida, Dolores 250 

Armstrong, Leatrice 325 

Arnold, Chris 325 

Arnone, Robert 325 

Arora, Tarunesh 241 

Arredondo, Joel 325 

Artiner. Alan 267, 316, 325 

Ash. Darlene 325 

Associated Women Students 243 

Assn. for Childhood Ed 242 

Atcheson, Richard 325 

Atkins, Brenda 291 

Atkinson, Beth 314 

Atwood, Walter 325 

Auld, Jeff 240 

Auskings, Judi 242 

Ausprunk, Celine 325 

Ayers, Charles 245, 247, 320. 325 

Ayers, Robert 32S 

Aiaiml, Mohammed 259 

Aiaimi, Najwra 259 

Aiaimi, Saud 259 

B 

Baal, John 3|6_ 325 

Babbffy. Mary Jane 3I8 

Babiak, Gisela 325 

Bachna, Rudy 280 

Badalamenti, Ted 325 

Baehr. James 245. 255. 245, 277, 317 

Baer, EHen 325 

Bahler. Christina ' 325 

Bahr, John 260, 279 

Bailey. Sherry 257 

Balnbridge, Suzanne 325 

Baird, Phyllis 325 

Baker, Edwin 255, 325 

Baker. Jack 245, 300, 325 

Baker, Thomas 303_ 325 

Baker, William 325 

Balbresky, Linda 314 

Ball, Barry 325 

Ball, Clifton ,..-. 325 

Ball, Stephanie 242, 325 

Ballangee, Joseph .302 

Ballo. Charles 325 



Balogh, Linda 325 

Balogh, Michael 325 

Baluch. Mary 325 

Bambic, Frank 325 

Banks, Charles 301 

Baran, Eugenia 325 

Baran, Luba 325 

Baraniuk, yera 325 

Barb, Paul 325 

Barbie, Jeff 304 

Barillarf, Concetta 325 

Barker, Richard 258 

Barkis, Faith 325 

Barna, Joseph 325 

Barnes, Ellen 283 

Barnes. Julie 303 

Barnett, Frank 307, 325 

Barnum, Jo 325 

Barf, Ronald 267, 313 

Barrere, Donald 274, 325 

Barrett, Dave 307 

Barrls, Robert 325 

Bartko, BeHy 262 

Bartolone, William 3|4, 325 

Baseball 22 23 

Bashore, James 241 

Basketball 150, 151, 152, 153 

Baes, Brooks 325 

Battista. Michael 271 

Bauer, Jill 326 

B»um, Robert 326 

Bavender, Candace 279 

Baxter, Barbara ,.,.314 

Bea ber, Patty ^ 300 

Beadnelt, Avrs \ 326 

Beale, Leo 281 

Beard, David 326 

Becherer, Robert 324 

Becht, George 255 

Bechtel, D-avId 326 

Bechto). Skip 314 

Beck, Kenneth 326 

Beck, Vicki 247 

Beck, William 258 

Beckenholdt, Cheryl 324 

Becker, Avery 324 

Bedeil, Toby 326 

Bedford, Judy 257 

Begala, Joe 183. 280 

Belansky, Jane 326 

Belba, Eugene 324 

Belt, Frances 314 

Bell, Robert 324 

Bellan, Ruth 244,326 

Bellrnski. Suianne 324 

Benes. Mark 311 

Benjamin, Keith 326 

flennedetti, Greg 2BI 

Bennett, Andrea 324 

Bennett, Michael 326 

Bennett, Jr., Ward 324 

Benott, Peter 245, 260 

Benson, Judy 324 

Bente, Nancy 324 

Benton, Sharon .324 

Beremay, Kathy 324 

Berg, Darlene 242, 326 

Berg, Donald 280 



Berg, Kathryn 2J5 

Berg, Mary 324 

Berg. Mimi 314 

Berger, Adele 300 

Berka, Richard 324 

Berkeley, Theodore 326 

Bernal, Yvonne 291 

Bernard, Kathleen 314 

Bernlar, Robert 245, 321, 324 

Bernler, William 247. 279, 320 324 

Bernstein, Brian 324 

Bernstein, Steven 324 

Berry, Ann 326 

Berry, John 326 

Berry, Robert 326 

Bertram, Cynthia 294 

Bertram, Pamela 326 

Berwald, John 324 

Besco, Thomas 326 

Besselman, Cheryl 300 

Best, Lawrence 326 

Bast, William 324 

Beta Alpha Psi , 244 

Beta Beta Beta 256 

Betegh. Nicholas 277 

Betteridge, Katherlne 324 

Beuck, Elizabeth 326 

Beukema, Robert 324 

Beyer, Geraldlne 326 

Beyer, James 313 

Bialowas, Gary 324 

Biasella, Susan 324 

Bibb, Marty 312 

Bible. Cheryl 326 

BIckerstaff. Karen 247. 277 

Bickis, Robert 241, 326 

Bidingef, Nancy 326 

Biedler, Dr. J. Sam 274 

Bieh!, Donna 317 

Biellch, Pam 283 

Biemel. Alice 262. 327 

Bierman, Barbara 247, 294 

Bike. Lon 245 

Bindef, Frank 327. 

Binkley. Bruce 327 

BIrskovich, Bernadette 327 

Birskovich, Marianne 327 

BIschoff, Becky 254 

Bishop, David ,327 

Bishop. Ralph 251 

Bisler, Margaret .....297, 327 

Bissler, Mary 327 

Blachly. Paule^te 327 

Black. Gordon 327 

Black, Larry- 311, 327, 385 

Blackie, David 327 

Blain, Ian 327 

Blanc, Pamela 327 

Blasius, Donald .327 

Blau. Larry -. 327 

Bleich, Karen 294. 317 

Bleshman, Andree 287 

Blessing, Dona 327 

Blind. Roy 239, 241. 327 

Bloomfield, Shelly 244 

Btosier. Fred 245 

Blue, Gregory 327 

Blue Key <..245 

directory/ 195 



Bluebdugh, Richard 27i 

Bluestein, Monica 270 

Blurtofi. Michael 161 

Bodamer, Susan ...327 

Bodnar. Lydia 237 

Bob. Chrlitine 327 

Bogovich. Michele 327 

Boquski. Barbara 284 

Boianowski, Carol 327 

Bolenbdugh, Marcia 283 

Boll, Barbara 327 

Bolingef , Patricia 327 

Bond. Daniel 252. 253 

Bond, Judith 284 

Bondhuj, Jennifer 298, 327 

Bonney, Steve 308 

Boodey, Gary 327 

Book. Ronald 312 

Bopa, Linda 240, 241 

Borbet, Stephen 254 

Borkowski. Christine 327 

Borkowski. Janet 327 

Borocz, Edward 327 

Borsch, Sue 327 

Borton, Nancy 327 

Borwell, Frank "327 

Borwell. Mark 258 

Borwell, Skip 316 

Bosick, M'chael 327 

Bourdamis, Tessia 327 

Bowdon, Bruce 2i5, 327 

Bowe. Alene 291 

Bowed. Roxia 327 

Bowen. Timothy 327 

Bowers, Lynda 242 

Bowling, Janet 292 

Bowman, Carol 248, 298, 327 

Boyd, Douglas 327 

Boyd, Steven 317 

Boyer, Gene 311 

Boyer, Russell 244 

Brace, Roberl 239 

Bracken, James 327 

Bradbary, James 327 

Bradley, Kathleen 327 

Bradner, Susan 327 

Brady, Edward 327 

Brady, Kathy 302 

Bratt, Dennis 255. 323 

Bratt, Michael 267.323 

Braiman, Daryl 316, 327 

Brandt, Lorraine 313 

Brandy, Ellen 327 

Brashear. Rebecca 327 

Brauer, June 328 

Brauning, Willrarn 328 

Braialovici, Janii 328 

Breniser, Richard 328 

Brenner, Janet 305 

Brenne.', William 328 

Brett, Michaela 328 

Bretif elder, Doret ,■'. 328 

Brewer. Loretta 328 

Brewster. Robert 300, 328 

Brian. Gregory 328 

Brickman. Charles 301 

Briggi, Susan 328 

Bright, Lory 282 

Brill, Charle$ 388 

Brna. George 328 

Brockett. Gary 316 

Brockett, Roger 328 

directory/ 196 



Broda, Dennis 328 

Brodsky, Jerry 328 

Brogoch, Diane 328 

Brongo, Edward 313 

Bronson, Beverly 243, 2«, 278 

Broska. Gary 328 

flrotherj. James " 257. 320 

Brown, Barbara 328 

Brown, Catherine 328 

Brown, Charles 270 

Brown, Dr. Glenn IBI 

Brown, Ken 323 

Brown. Kent 315 

Brown. Maureen 328 

Brown. Miriam 328 

Brown, Regina 254 

Brown, Shelia 284. 328 

Brown. Thomas 328 

Brown, Tracy 328 

Brown, William 314 

Brumbaugh, Barbara 277 

Brumby, Hal 317 

flrumm, David 269 

Bruner, Ralph 328 

Bruning, Linda 247, 295 

Brunner, Julie 328 

Brunst, Linda 328 

Bryner. Paul 328 

Brzowskf, Jean 328 

Buchanan, James . . ." 279 

Buchanans, Robert 328 

Buck, Michael . ! . ^ 251 

Buck, Regina 328 

Buckingham, Ross 328 

Buddi, Lynn 296, 328 

Suente, Claire 328 

Buganskl. Bert 239 

Bunch, B. Timothy 328 

Burchik, James 328 

Surge.-. Judith 328 

Burghardt, Nancy 284 

Burgner, Timothy 256 

Burick, Thomas 280 

Burkhardt. Douglas 328 

Burkhardt, James 328 

Burkhardt, Robert 328 

Burkland, Nancy 328 

Burleson, Robert 307 

Burlin. Dennis 328 

Burlon, Patricia 326 

Burney. Jacquelyn 328 

Burns, Judith 328 

Burns, Pamela 328 

Burns, Robert 312 

Burton, Patricia 291 

Bush. Frank r. . . .244. 329 

Bussard, Alan 329 

Butcher. Bob 316 

Butler. Michael 329 

Butts, James 238 

Butz. Todd 329 

Buzzard, Wally 304 

Bydash, Dennis 329 

Byeri. Terry 240, 241 

Byrum, Rick 307 

C 

Cabalda, Jacqueline 298, 329 

Cabala, Janis 329 

Cadden, William 329 

CahiM, Drew 329 

Cajka, Mary Jane 329 



Calderhead, Pamela 313 

Calhoun, Elizabeth 245, 329 

Callahan, James 308 

Callahan, Paul 329 

Callough. James 329 

Campbell, Deanna 329 

Candea. Richard 281 

Cannam. Charles 329 

Cannata, Arthur 329 

Cannon. Cheryl 329 

Cannon. Eileen 314 

Cantlon. James 329 

Caplei. Gary 329 

Carberry, Kenneth 329 

Cardinal Key 245 

Carey, Celine 286 

CarH. Phyllis 329 

Carlln, Bill 257 

Carlson, Douglas 329 

Carlson, Susan 265. 329 

Carlton, Scott ..,;... 329 

Carnes, Lois 329 

Carpenter, Reed 239, 329 

Carpenter, Robert 329, 391 

Carr, Carolyn — 329 

Carr, Cynthia 292 

Carr, Kevin 311 

Carter, Laveria 291 

Carter, Luana 329 

Casey, Dennis 314 

Casey, Kathryn 329 

Casey, Mark 329 

Casey, Nancy 329 

Cassidy, James 314 

Casteltana, John 245, 329 

Castor, Gerald 329 

Catalan, Abyssinia 329 

Catallna, Louis 329 

Catalusci, Gloria 329 

Catchpole, Debbie 272 

Gathers, Michael ...y 329 

Caton, Linda 329 

Catrambone, George 329 

Caufleld, James 329 

Cavelll, Rowe 329 

Caylor, Carol 329 

Centa. Robert 322 

Cerio, Janis 329 

Chahuan. Jeanette 259, 329 

Chakan, Richard 329 

Chakofsky, Randi 329 

Chamberlain, Lauren 329 

Chambers, Bruce 330 

Chamowiti, Lynda 282 

Champion, Deborah 330 

Chanak Jr., Michael .......330 

Chapln, Janice 330 

Charek, Dennis 330 

Chase, Sharon 330 

Chassin, Christine r; 330 

Chen, Chih-Ming 330 

Chestnut League 247 

Chicota, Myron . . ., 330 

Chi Omega 292, 293 

Chipps, Glenda :... 330 

Chipps, Sue 240, 241 

Chltty, Linda 330 

Chlysta. Russell 300 

Chorey, John 320 

Chrlstman, Greg 239 

Christman, Terry 308 

Christopher, Carol 330 



Christy, Suzanne 330 

Chrysler, Barb 283 

Chrysfe.'. Bill 308 

Church, Barbara 288, 330 

Church, Pamela 250 

Church. Rhonda 330 

Cifant. Anthony 269 

Cimmerall. Frank 308 

Cincala, Audrey 330 

Clokan. Roger 330 

Clolek, Donald ...330 

Crrcosta, Robert 281 

Cironi, Marc 304 

Claghorn, Stephen 330 

Clark, Diane 298 

Clark, Donald 330 

Clark, Donna : . .279 

Clark, Gary '. 330 

Clark, Hugh 330 

Clark. Kathleen ., 242,296 

Clark. Linda 330 

Clark. Tana 330 

Clarke. Cindy , 330 

Clay, Rebecca 237 

Clayton. John 530 

Cleland, Mary 330 

Clendennen, Susan .^.330 

Cleveland, Cathy 330 

Clevenger. Linda 330 

Clhahorn, Steve 244 

Close. Robert 330 

Clough. Necia 330 

Clutch, Isador = -250 

Coan, Nancy 248 

Coan, Patricia 330 

Cobb. Robert ^ . . .330 

Coblentz. Gilbert 330 

Coblentz. John .330 

Coblentz, Mary 330 

Cochran, Jeannie 291 

Cochran, John 320 

Coder, Sandra 330 

Cody, James 330 

Coe, Linda 283 

Coed Cadettes 248 

Cog an, Vaughn 317 

Collegiate Marketing Assoc 249 

Collier, Lois 290 

Collins, Becky ■ '...■■ 247 

Collins, Jacqueline 330 

Collins. Richard 309 

Collins, Rose 330 

Colosetti, Jeanne 254 

Colson, Catherine ^ 330 

Condley, Charles ..., 330 

Conley, Sheila 262 

Connors, Charles 303 

Connors, Gail 330 

Conrad. Linda 330 

Conroy. Dennis 244 

Conway, Christopher 304 

Conway, Colleen 316 

Conway, John 330 

Cook Jr., Howard 331 

Cooke, James 331 

Cooney, Colleen 331 

Cooney, James 331 

Cooney, Karen 331 

Cooper, Bonnie 331 

Cooper, Patricia 331 

Cooper, Richard 251 

Copecci, Sandl 277 



Copeland, Jennifer 293 

Coppins. Linda 245, 246,331 

Corbett, Alan 302 

Corbett, Jr., Charles 331 

Corbett, Deborah 331 

Corcoran, Jim 261 

Corley, Jerilyn 291 

Cornes. Judith 263, 292, 331 

Corso, Maria 237 

CosteMo, John 331 

Cotton, Joanne ..331 

Council for Exceptional Children 252 

Courtad, Judith 292, 331 

Courtheyn, Donald 331 

Courtney, Richard 331 

Coury, Mary 322 

Cowell, Bruce 281 

Cowen. Allan .331 

Cox, Brian 331 

Cox. Edward 33 1 

Cox, Jane 331 

Cox, Judith 263, 331 

Coy, Sharon 270 

Crago, June 33! 

Craig. Jennie _. 331 

Craig, Kathy 331 

Craigs, Linda 331 

Crane, Robert 269 

Creili, William 331 

Crellin, Linda 331 

Crescuillo, James j 258 

Cretella, Joseph 269 

Crime Lab 169 

Crislip, Ronald 331 

Crosetto, Norma 245. 246, 331 

Cross Country 256 

Crown. Gayle 300 

Crum, Cecilia ..-. . .247 

Crysler, Barbara 331 

Csernotta, Nancy 331 

Cubic, Janet 331 

Culbertson, Judith 284 

Cullen. Thomas 257 

Cummings, Michael 331 

Cummtngs. Thomas 331 

Cummins. Kenneth 271 

Cunningham, Connie 331 

Cunningham. Deborah 331 

Cupp. Richard 384 

Cupples. Nancy 331 

Curry, Linda 291 

Curtis, Burleigh 258, 331 

Curtis. Sherrie 331 

Curtis, Thomas 239, 331 

Curtis!. Pamela 300 

Czarny, Cynthia 331 

Czehut, Donald 33| 

D 

Daffner, Donald 33 1 

D'Agoitino, Loretta 33 1 

Dahms, Debbie 272 

Daily Kent Stater 250, 251 

Dailey. Roger 241 

Dale, Theodore 33| 

palesiandro, James 3I8 

D'Alessio. John 331 

Daley, Ann 331 

Oalin, Shirley 332 

Dambach, Keith 306, 332 

D'Ambrocia, Vicki 332 

O'Andre, Cynthia 332 



Danhoffer. Dolores 332 

Danicki, Catherine 332 

Daniel. William 332 

Dannley, John 281 

Danttmo, Frank 316 

Dapper, Joan . . ^ ". 228 

Dardis. Garry 332 

Darpoh, Benjamin 259 

Datz, Robert 260 

Daugherty, Beth 332 

Daunoris, Cheryl 332 

David, Andrea 237, 254 

Davidson. Vicki 332 

Davie J, Bruce 315 

Davis. Carolyn 332 

Davis, Cheryl 332 

Davis, Deborah 332 

Davis. John 332 

Davis, Nancy 332 

Davis, Randy 307 

Daw. Brian 311 

Dawes, Nathaniel 332 

Dawson, Kenneth 256 

Day, Daniel 332 

Day, Norman 332 

Dean, Diane 332 

Dean, Harold 332 

Dean. Mary 332 

Dearth. Cheryl 332 

DeBaqia, Lawrence 239, 332 

Debevec, Marilyn 332 

OeBlasio, Jeanette 286 

Debula, Beckie 272 

Dechellis, Albert 307, 332 

Decker, Mark 314 

Decker, Sandra , 270. 332 

Decker, Suzanne 237 

Deegan. Jack 258 

Deete,*, Richard 313 

Delmling, Gary 332 

Deltrick, Janet 332 

Delaplane, Whitfield 332 

Delong. Janis 332 

Delpozzo, Diane 248, 332 

Delpozzo. Reglna 242 

Del Prince, Robert 332 

Delta Gamma ...294 295 

Delta Sigma Theta 291 

Delta Tau Delta 302, 303 

Delta Upsllon '. . . .^ 304 

Delta Zeta 296, 297 

DeMarco, James |B3 

Demass, Michael 3|3 

Dempsey, Harry 332 

DeNat, Barb 254 

Denk, Douglas 332 

Dense, Mary 332 

Denton, Kathryn 332 

Denton, William 313 

DePiere, Sue 294 

Deppen. Ruth 332 

DeRodes, William 332 

DeSanti. Annamarie 332 

Destefano, Carol 284 

Detjen, Robert 238 

Detter, Nea! 305 

Detwiler. Rick 255 

Deucher. Kathleen 332 

Devlnny, Stephen 315 

Dewltz. Harry 332 

Dewitz. Judith 332 

Dick, Gary 332 



Dlckerson. Thom 279 

Dickinson. Vicki 300 

Dickinson, Wendy 248 

Dickson, Joyce 249, 332 

Dieglio, Tony 332 

Diehm, Dennis , 332 

DIenert, John 332 

Dietrich, Lamar 247 

Dietz, Cheryl 333 

Difford, Deborah 262 

Difloure. Thomas 333 

Diggs. Ladene 274 

Dlqrino, Bernard 332 

D'grino. Nick 280 

Dike, Nadine 296 

DIM anna. David 281 

DiRienzo, June 333 

Disbro, David 333 

Disbro, Larry 333 

Diser, Richard , 333 

Dishong, Kathryn 237 

Ditcher, Joseph 333 

Dobbins. Carol 333 

Dobbins, Renee 291 

Dobos, Elaine 262, 333 

Dobrovic, Cynthia 301 

Dobson. Ron 306 

Dockus, J. Elaine 333 

Dodge. Stephen 333 

Dokhall, Dakhit 333 

Dommel, Susan 277, 287 

Donaldson Jr., Clay 333 

Donnelly. Maureen 333 

Donovan, Mike .317 

Dorris. Faith 333 

Dougherty, Janet 333 

Douglas, Cindy 333 

Doull, James 300 

Dourney, Maureen 333 

Dove. Linda 333 

Dowd, Daniel 360 

Doyle, Tracey 270 

Drake, Raleigh 180 

Dreussi, Gina 333 

Druda, Carmen y. 333 

DuBois. John 304 

Duck, Jim 304 

Dudley. Mike 303 

Duerk. Sabra 333 

Drues, Cheryl 313 

Duffle. Mike 308 

Duffy, Cathy 247. 270, 333 

Dugan. James 240. 241. 333 

Dukes, Thomas 333 

Dumanskl, Patricia 333 

Dunbar Hall 209 

Duncan. Charles 269, 333 

Duncan, Louise 247 

Duncanson. Scott 260 

Dunfee. Elizabeth 333 

Dunfee. Martha 333 

Dungan, Kathleen 283, 333 

Dunk, Linda 333 

Dunk, Stanley 333 

Dunlap. Jan 313 

Dunlavy. Edroe 279, 333 

Dunn, Kathryn .■> 272 

Dunning, Jill 270, 333 

Durand, Dennis 333 

Durfey, Timothy ^ .333 

Durkee, Susan 314 

Durst. John 333 



Dutley. Chris 30S 

Dye, James 244, 333 

Dye. Michael 333 

Dysert, Jay 333 

Dytko, Sandra 333 

Dzladosz, Dan 280 

Dzuban. Eugene 333 

Dzurilla. Robert 333 

Ozyak, Margaret 333 

E 

Eads, David 333 

Eames, William 281, 320 

Eason, Donald 333 

Eason, Jeanette 333 

Eberhardt, Jane 298 

Eckert. Susan 299, 334 

Eddy, Eliiabeth 334 . 

Edetstein. Steven 24i 

Edgecombe, Patricia 28& 

Edmunds, Deborah 247 

Edwards, Thomas 258 

Egan, Susan 334 

Egekeie, John 259 

Ehlert, Janet 334 

Eiben. Patricia 237 

Eisel, Barbara 245. 334 

El-Dabh, Halim 181 

Eldridge, Jennifer 334 

Ellashek, Karen 284 

Elling, Christina 249, 270, 334 

Ellinger, David 300 

Elliott, Bruce 300 

Elliot, Cassi 283 

Ellis, Carol ...334 

Ellis, Deborah 292 

Elliston, Robert 244. 

Ello:, James 238 

Emerick, Elaine 270 

Emig, Vicky 334 

Engel, Michael 240, 241, 334 

Engel, Paul 251 

Englehart, Phyllis 334 

Engleman Hall 210 

Enochian, Susan 334 

Ereth, David 334 

Ericson, Scott 305 

Erickson, William 270. 334 

Erikson, Leonard 334 

Esenwine, Karen 334 

Eshelman, Marilyn 334 

Eskstine, Kathy 302 

Estadt, John 32! 

Ethridge, Louis 334 

Evans, Mario 334 

Evans, Sheila 290 

Everette, Christopher 312 

Everhart, Tom 334 

Everson, Linda 334 

Ewing, Joan 259 

Eyster, Charles 334 

F 

Faber, Kathy 282, 334 

Fabich, Ronald 334 

Fadahunsi, Isaac 259 

Fagin, Shelley 334 

Fahl, Harvey 2S6 

Fahringer, Melanie 334 

Fair, Jeffrey 334 

Falkner, Bonnie 294 

fallis, Barbara 295 

directory/ 197 



Fanning, Patrick 305 

Fantauizt, Doris 334 

Fargo, Linda 334 

Farr, Janet 277 

Fast, Georgene 334 

Fath. Dennis -334 

Fawley, Michael 334 

Featheringham, Dr. Richard 180 

Fedor, Christine 334 

Fodun, Martha 334 

Fedyk. Douglas '> 334 

Felkert, Jim 305 

Fencing '36, '37 

Fenton. Linda 334 

Ferguson. Jerilynn 294, 334 

Ferko. Patricia 313, 334 

Fernandez. Ruthanne 334 

Fernella Jr., Michael 334 

Ferrante, Francine 285 

Ferrarese. Stephen 238, 334 

Ferree. David 334 

Ferrel. Nancy 299 

Fetters, James 251 

Ficarra. Anthony 334 

Fiedler, Mark 31 1. 334 

Fields. Sharon ' 290 

Filgate. Carol 334 

Filipic, Mary 334 

Filo, John 334, 390 

Fine, Karen 289 

Finfinger, Suzanne 334 

Fink, George 335 

Finkel. Beverly 335 

Finkelstein, Robyn 1 335 

Finley. Kirt 312 

Finnen, Michael 300, 355 

Fischer, Nancy 335 

Fischer, Pamela 335 

Fisco, Carol 272 

Fischet, Dr. Murray 180 

Fisher. Barbara 335 

Fisher, Curtis 239, 335 

Fisher, Dennis 238 

Fisher, Edwin 335 

Fisher, Greg 277 

Fisher, Kathy 335 

Fisher. Thomas 267 

Fittipaido, Beverly 263,335 

Fizgerald. John 281, 335 

Fitzgerald, Judie 335 

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen 335 

Flanagan, Kathleen 335 

Flecknee, Linda 335 

Fleissner, Jane 335 

Fleitz. Ron 281 

Fleming, Ronald 304 

Fletcher Hall 212. 213 

Floro, Jackie 288 

Fogel, Joseph 335 

Fogg, Gregory '. 335 

Foley, Robert 240 

Fonte, James 335 

football 140, 141, 142, 143 

Foradas, Francine 287 

Forbes, Lucille 335 

Forcella, Lisa 285 

Ford, Gary 314 

Ford, Rebecca 335 

Foreman. Kathleen 285 

Forcniic Asiociatlon 253 

Forney, Joan 246, 335 

Forney, John 244 

direct ory/l9e 



Forrester, Willlain 255 

Foster, ffeverly 335 

Fousek, Theresa 335 

Fovargue, Ronald 256, 335 

Fox, Edmond 355 

Fox. Kenneth 27t 

Fox. Richard 335 

Fox, Robert 279, 335 

Fox. Tina 305 

Frame, Dennis 239 

Francis, Joanna 335 

Francis, Stephen 258 

Franco, Rosemary 316 

Franciyk, Thomas 335 

Frango, Rosemary 335 

Frank, David 335 

Frank, Glenn W 183 

Frank, Paul 322 

Franklin, Christine 335 

Franklin, Lydia 291 

Franklin. Lynn .* 248, 265, 268, 335 

Fraser, George 335 

Fravel, Lois 335 

Fraiier, Christina 282 

Freconna, Joseph 335 

Freitag, Edna * 335 

Friddle, Douglas 321 

Friedman, Shelly .246 

Friel, Thomas 335 

Fries, Michael ? 335 

Fritz, Charles 300 

Fritz, David 335 

Froehlich, Judith 286 

Frontino, Jayne 243, 296 

Frontino, Thornas 335 

Frost, David 335 

Fuhrer, Rick 247 

Fullerman, David 239 

Fultz, John 306, 335 

G 

Gabriel, Jane 335 

Gadomski, Michael 260, 261 

Gaebler, Gloria 335 

Gage, Cynthia 298 

Gage, Robert 279 

Gainer, Linda 335 

Gaines. Rick 336 

Galambos, Dennis 336 

Galdun. Nancy 336 

Galena, Jane 245 

Gallagher. Lawrence 336 

Gallagher. Susan 261, 336 

Gallagher. Thomas 336 

Gallese, Frank 314 

Gallissio. Mark 245 

Gallizii, Patrick 336 

Gallupe, Gary 336 

Gamma Phi Beta 298, 299 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 254 

Garber, Gerry , 315 

Gardner, Linda 282 

G a ringer, Karen 336 

Garmus, Susan 336 

Garnis, Theresa .254 

Garvey, Ruth 288 

Gasior, Diane 336 

Gasior, Susan 247 

Gaskini, Larry 261, 3l2 

Garzke, Ronna 336 

Gauger, Michael i 305 

Gauldin, Nancy J40 



Gaydos, Paggy 336 

Gaynor, Marcia 336 

Geanangel, Skipper 336 

Gedeon, Kathryn 237, 254, 272 

Geffert, Diana 336 

Gehlbach, Richard : 279 

Gelerinter, Dr. Edv/ard 246 

Gelin. Wendy 336 

Gembarosky, Karen 336 

Gemberling, J. Michael 336 

Gentile, Larry 334 

Gentile, Nancy 334 

Georgiafandls, Nick 336 

Gerber, Gail 336 

Gerhardt, Gail 295 

Germano, Anthony 336 

Gesing, Michael 336 

Gessner, W. Scott 336 

Ghee, Larry : 336 

Giammaria, Judith 285 

Giampapa, Stephen 300 

Giannamore, Bert 308, 336 

Giannamore, Natalie 336 

Gibbs, Georgia 262 

Gibson, John 306 

Gier, Lois 299, 334 

Gifford, Susan 336 

Gigliotti, Karen 254 

Gtgliottl. Michael ......*...., 336 

Gilbert, Patricia ..'. 336 

Gilbert, Jon 336 

Gilfillen, Statler 279 

Gill, Marsha 336 

Gill, Thomas 336 

Gillespie, Christina 336 

Gillet, James 306, 334, 389 

Gllletly, Randall 336 

Gillis, DIanne 336 

Giovangnoli, Thomas 336 

Girone, Janice 248, 289, 336 

Gladd. Catherine 271 

Gladd, Linda 254 

Glaser, Lynn 336 

Glavan, Jeffrey 336 

Glowick, Gayle 336 

Glyptis, Mark 317, 334 

Gochnour, Mary 252 

God bout, James 336 

Godino, Jeffrey 336 

Godshalk, Pamela 297, 337 

Goetticher, Diane 314 

Goff, Linda 295 

Goldberg, Lewis : 337 

Goldberg, Shelley 337 

Golden, Tom 240, 241 

Goldman, Barbara . .- 245, 293 

Goldner, Julia 337 

Goll, Robert 337 

Gongol, Phylyss 337 

Good. William 337 

Goodman, James -SS? 

Goodman, Mark 337 

Gordon, Kay 337 

Gordon, Kenneth 279, 337 

Gorman, Edward 257 

Gorman, Janet 297, 337 

Gorman, Michael 337 

Gostely, Martha 254 

Gott, David 337 

Gotwald, Karen 337 

Gover, Jack 337 

Gowasack, Gregory 259 



Gowens, Donald 269 

Gowens, Robert 258, J37 

Gowlns, Pamela 337 

Goye.-, Jeffrey 337 

Grabenstetter, Gail ., 337 

Grable, Ronald , 251 

Grace, Cynthia 337 

Graft, Rita 337 

Graham. James 337 

Graham, Janice 262 

Gram, George 247 

Gramc, John 260 

Grahcey, Donna 295, 314 

Grano, Linda 337 

Graves, Deborah 337 

Grdina, Andrew 337 

Greco, James 337 

Greco, Rosalie 337 

Greco, Susan . . ,. 277 

Gredesky. Joseph ^. 250 

Green. Carl 311 

Green, James 318 

Green, Larry 317 

Green, Ruth 272 

Greenawal?, Patricia 337 

Greenberg, Gert 337 

Greene, Kathleen 270, 281 

Greene, Kenneth 337 

Greguric, Vicki 337 

Gretchen, Rosemary 337 

Grey, Leslie 337 

Gribble, Mary 337 

Gribby, Carina 272 

Grider, Bruce 258 

Grleser, Roger 312 

Griffin, Michael ....'. 304 

Griffith. Brenda .337 

Griffith, Deborah 270, 337 

Griffith. JoAnn ..-337 

Griffith. Judy 237 

Grimaldi. Edward 337 

Grimes, Doug 319 

Grindle, Bonnie 272 

Grinstead, Pamela .337 

Grisetti, Angela 300 

Grobelny, Walter 321 

Grobleski, John 337 

Grocott, Irene 337 

Gross. Allan 337 

Gross, Allan 337 

Gross. Bruce 309 

Gross, Theodore 337 

Groves, Susan 337 

Grubbs. Sandra 262 

Grudzinski, Steven 337 

Guess. Kathy ...247 

Gumbert. Jerry 245 

Gute, Sharon 254 

Guiik, Jeffrey 337 

Gymnastics 130. 131, 132, 133, 134, 135 

H 

Haas, Linda 277, 285 

Haas, Patricia 337 

Habercorn, Christine 338 

Hachtel, Sally 237 

Haddock. Cheryl 338 

Haflinger. Carol 338 

Hageman, Paul 321 

Hager, Laura 338 

Haines, Jamie ....299, 338 

Haines, Scott 305 

Hajec, Walter 304 



Halberf, Kathi 247, 338 

Halbert. Kenneth 338 

Hall. Barbara 338 

Halt, Fred 338 

Hall, Nancy 338 

Hall, Robert 338 

Halt. Roseanne 294 

Haller. Josepti 338 

Hallett, Steplianie . . . ; 338 

Halvey, Constance 250 

Hamada. Sadao 260 

Hambelton, Carolyn 338 

Hambr'glit, James 321 

Hamilton, Susan 338 

Hammond. Jeffrey 338 

Hamrak. Marge 247 

Hana, Gary 338 

Hanchik, Jean 338 

Hancock, Bonnie 25! 

Hanel, Karen 338 

Hange, Jane ., 338 

Hankins, Lynn 282 

Hanni, Neil 33S 

Hansen, Peggy , 338 

Harbt. Mohamed 338 

Harbourt. Hall 211 

Hardie, Judith 338 

Hardy. Edward ......:... .338 

Harrington. Jeanne 272 

Harrington, Vearl \ 338 

Harris. Greta 237, 289 

Harris. Sonya 338 

Harris, Susan 247 

Harry, Kattiy 338 

Hart. Linda .' 333 

Hart. Robert 338 

Hart, Suzanne ^ 338 

Hartford, Robert 338 

Hartis. Frances 271 

Hartman, Ronald 256 

Hartsock, John 321, 338 

Havel, Bruce 249 

Harvey, Janice 338 

Harvey, tvielanie 333 

Harvith, JoAnn 296, 338 

Haseiey, Kenneth 338 

Haskakil, Ntckolaos 338 

Hathaway, Kenneth 338 

Haueter, Jeanette 333 

Haught, Diana 333 

Hausman. Irwin 333 

Havel. Bruce , 333 

Havener, Ronald 333 

Hawes, Genet+e 279, 338 

Hawkins, Jr., Charles 333 

Hawkins, Julie 245, 287. 338 

Hawley. Jack 333 

Hawn. Joyce 339 

Hayward. Sally 339 

Hazard, Carta 283. 316. 339 

Hazelwood, Jr., Russell 339 

Haien. Gordon 300 

Head. Fred 3I4 

Heatwole, Eric 3I4 

Hearn, Deborah 290 

Hedeen, Rosanne 262 

Hedges, Margarite . 268 

Hedrick, Linda 339 

Heer Hall 214 

He' I. Mark . 301 

Heilman, Lloyd 320 339 

Heinrsch, Charlie , , 283 



Heinlein, Karen . . . : 389 

Heinonen, Lee 339 

Heiser, Eileen 339 

Heiier, Kathy 261 

Hemsley. Cynthia 249, 339 

Henderson, Theodora 339 

Henderson, Todd 339 

Henderson. Jr., Wijliafn 339 

Hendricks, Vlcki 339 

Hennigan. Dan 253 

Henry, Carol 339 

Henry, Joyce 261 

Henry, Roxanne - 258 

Hensel, Debra 240, 284, 339 

Henson. Thomas 339 

Hentosh, Craig 339 

Herbst, Kristi 339 

Herd, Saralynn 291 

Heritage, Dennis 240 

Heritage, George 339 

Herman, Jr., Andrew 339 

Herrrngton. An'ta 247, 339 

Herrman, Robert 339 

Herron, John 339 

Herron, Michael 339 

Hershberger, Judy 339 

Hershberger, Ronald 339 

Hess, Ronald 339 

Hibala, Susan 339 

Hicks, Carol 290 

Hickson, Jed 281 

Hletanen. Carol 339 

Higgins, David 339 

Higgins, John ..339 

High Court 252, 253 

Highland. Clifton 339 

Highland, William 339 

Hill, Bruce 271 

Hill, Cynthia 291 

Hill, Janet ^ 290 

Hill, Jack 339 

HIM, Judy 339 

Hlllegas, Robert 339 

Hillel ^ 246 

Hillief, Carolyn 339 

Hills, James 339 

Hillsman, Joe 269 

Hiltebrant, Greg 339 

Himler. Nancy 242 297 

Hinchey, Edward 339 

Hincman, Philip 339 

Hindman, John 255, 267, 308, 339 

Hinshaw, Timothy 247 

H'nterschied, David 339 

Hippie, Keith , 238 

Hirshberg, Craig 288' 

Hisey, Robert 339 

Hitch, Dorothy 245, 268. 294, 339 

Hockey |60, 161 

Hodgson, Betty 339 

Hodgson, Penny 247 

Hodnett, Fran 287 

Hoffman, George 339 

Hoffman. Joseph 246 

Hoffman, Margaret 269 

Hogan, Briart 314 

Holland, Barbara 287 

Holland, Pamela 339 

Holleman. Michael 340 

Holler, William 303, 340 

Hoi linger, Shelia 391 

Hollingsworth, Kathleen 340 

Hollingsworth, Ronald 340 



Holub, Robert 340 

Hook. Marjorie 340 

Hoover, William 340 

Hopkins, Richard 340 

Hoppert, III, George 256, 340 

Horan, Patrick 239 

Horning, Candy 340 

Horrigan, Vincent 319, 340 

Horst, Cynthia 34O 

Horst, James 340 

Horton, Dorothy , 290 

Horvath, Linda 340 

Horvath, Marianne .' 340 

Hosfeld, Arlene 340 

Hoskin, Michael ,340 

Hossalla. Shirley 340 

Hosterman, Craig 253 

Hothem, Barbara 340 

Hothem. Vicki 283 

Houchins, Ronald 340 

Householder. Jtll 34O 

Houser, Kathleen 340 

Hout, David 340 

Hover, David 2S0 

Howard, Beth 300 

Howard, Virginia 340 

Howell, James 340 , 

Howell. William 340 

Howie. Virginia 340 

Hoyer, Margaret 340 

Hoyt, William 302 

Hren, Janet 277 

Hrvatin, Linda 340 

Hubbs, Jetffrey 258 

Hube.', Thomas 309 

Hubin. Dr. Wilber 241 

Huck, Richard : 267,307 

Huck, Teresa 286 

Hudak. James 361 

Hueston, Harry *. 269, 340 

Hugh. Joan T. 340 

Hughes, Dale 340 

Hughes, Janet 340 

Hughes, Terrance 340 

Hules, Ronald 340 

Humerickhouse, David 340 

Humes. Cartene ,. ..340 

Hummel, James 382 

Hummer. Kathleen 340 

Humphrey Hall 216, 217 

Huner, Rita 296 

Hunt, Diantha 340 

Hunt, Edna 340 

Hunt, Edward 340 

Hunt, Geraten 340 

Hunf, Jeffrey 247 

HurxJ, Brig tte 248 

Hurd, Robert 340 

Hurley. Elizabeth .,'. 340 

Hurley, Jeffrey 309 

Hursh, Frederick 314 

Hursf, Sherri 340 

Huri-, Claude 340 

Hustak, Lynda 340 

Hutchins, Nancy 340 

Huierik, Gabe 302 

Hyatf, Sharon 341 

HymowitzV Myra 300 

Hyrmer, Barbara 341 

Hystop, William 270,341 

I 

lervolino, Annette 341 



tllston, Brenda 283 341 

tmbaratto, John 341 

Immke, Joyce 341 

tngraham. Bruce 32| 

Ingraham, Ted 320 

Ingram, Sherry 341 

trrter-Fraternity Council 255 

Irvin, Suzanne 34} 

Irwin, Wanda 297 

Ischo, Frances 341 

luy. Deb 305 

J 

Jablonsky, Elaine 3|2 

Jackson, Judy 341 

Jackson, Katherine 285 

Jackson, Kathy 279 

Jaguckl. Rita 341 

Jakelehto, Dennis 341 

James, Anne 341 

James III, Thomas 341 

Jancsurak, Kathleen 341 

Janecek. Jan 272 

Janik, Ronald 341 

Jankowski, Anthony 258 

Jankowski. Carol 341 

Jarvis. Linda 341 

Javitch, Linda 34} 

Jedick, Peter ,r 341 

Jedlicka, Diane 34| 

Jeffrey, Judy 284 

Jeffries, Joanne 268 

Jencks, Karen 240, 241 

Jenkins. Marty 3I7 

Jenner, Sarah 3I2 

Jensen, Karen . 258 

Jewett, Martha 291 

Jimeson, Shelly 285 

Jinks, Ronald 341 . 

Johng, Du Sik 259 

Johns, Jeanne , ,341 

Johnson, Lynne 34! - 

Johnson. Alei 316 

Johnson, Barbara 341 

Johnson, Cathleen 299 

Johnson. Cathy 30S 

Johnson, Christine 314 

Johnson, David 322, 341 

Johnson, Donald .323, 34! 

Johnson, Eric 250 

Johnson, Ethel ' 341 

Johnson, Hall 215 

Johnson, Jennifer 287 

Johnson, Joan 341 

Johnson, John 341- 

Johnson, Kayette 294 

Johnson, Linda 341 

Johnson, Marianne ' 341 

Johnson. Rebecca 266 

Johnson. Robert 238 

Johnson, Rose Anne 271 

Johnson, William 321 

Johnston. Robert 323 

Johnston. Rusty 309 

Johnston Jr., William 245, 277, 316.341 

Jones Jr., James 341 

Jones, Joanne 242 

Jones, John 255 

Jones, Lee 294, 318, 341 

Jones, Patricia 341 

Jones, Peggiann \34l 

Jorgenson, Janna 266 

Jori, Leonard 341 

directory/199 



Joseph. Carol 262 

Joslin, Jarics 3^1 

Joyce, Mark 301. W 

Joyce. Thomas 306, 341 

Judo 128. 12? 

Judo Club 257 

Judy, Sherry 341 

Julick. Clinton 341 

June, James 341 

Jurig. Nina 262 

Justen. PattI 289 

K 

Kacerski. Ann ^. ,341 

Kachmar, Rebecca 341 

Kadlowec, Noreen 285, 318, 341 

Kadowaki, Kathryn 284 

Kalen, Eleanor 342 

Kalo. Kathleen 342 

Kamerer, James 238, 342 

Kamienski, Sharon 312 

Kaminski, Douglas 342 

Kaminski, Marcta 252 

Kamp. Ronald 280 

Kandrac, Linda 342 

Kapella, Kim 304 

Kangas, Sue 342 

Kapitan, John 269, 311 

Kaplan, Dr. Lawrence 182 

Kaplan, Robert 342 

Kappa Phi 262 

Kappa Sigma 306, 307 

Karate Club 258 

Karl, Francis 342 

Karl, Janet 342 

Karrer, Diane 245,265,294,342 

Kaser, Connie 342 

Kdser, Robert 342 

Kass, Barb 342 

Kassay, Yolanda 342 

Kati, Gary 342 

Kaufholz, Chuck .270 

Keuft, Kay 342 

Kavcar. Judy 388 

Kay, Trina 342 

Kaylor, Ruth 342 

Keavney, George 397 

Keck, Ralph ; 342 

Keen, Timothy 342 

Kegg. Kate 283 

Keith, Carol 245, 287 

Keith, Stephen 306 

Kelleher, Patricia 342 

Keller, Lynn 342 

Keller, Michael 304 

Kelley, Daniel 301 

Kelley. Elizabeth 283 

Kelley, Lou 305 

Kellner, Joel 239 

Kelly. Cynthia 272 

Kelly, Donald 342 

Kelly. Robert 342 

Kemper, Cecelia 273, 342 

Kenney. Cheryl 342 

Kent Interhall Council ,. ; 260, 261 

Kent Internationals ,,- .259 

Kent, Sally , 262 

Kent. Thomas .■ 342 

Kentner, Edward .,,,, , 342 

Kerns, Linda 342 

Kerns, Sharon 342 

Kerr, Juanita ...342 

Kerf, Michael .....342 

directory/ 200 



Kerr, Rxhard 319 

Kesling, Cynthia 292 

Kesling, Cynthia 342 

Kessel, Barry 342 

Kevern, Donn 342 

Khoury, James ...;.., 342 

Kiacz, Steve . . . .- 304 

KIckel. James 342 

Kifner. John 251 

Kilbane, Marilyn 300 

Kilburn, Leieith 291 

Kilkenny, Rosemary 259 

Kilroy, Barbara 247 

Kim, Jeung 258 

Kim, Myung 342 

Kimmel, Dennis 257 

King, Bruce 252, 253 

Kingsbury, Jane 342 

Kinnen, Dale 321 

Kinney, Cheryl 342 

Kiraly, Thomas 342 

Kirchner, Barbara 342 

Kirk. Duane 314,342 

Kirk, Susan 342 

Kirkland, Aldren 301 

Kirkpatrick, Jr., John 342 

Kirch, Sherry 298, 316, 342 

Kirsopp, Cheryl 247 

Kishman, Penny 342 

Kissel, Terry 342 

Kist, Anita 343 

KPase, Marlin 343 

Klass, Marilyn 268, 343 

Klavon, Raymond 343 

Klein, Lillian 343 

Klie, Mindy 286, 300 

Kline, Kathleen 343 

Kline. Ruth 342 

Kling, Eileen 343 

Kling, Lllsa 343 

Klinger, Terry 248 

Klotz. Lynn 284 

Kniesner, John ; 343 

Knight. Diane '. 288 

Knoch, Judy 284 

Knopp, Nancy 254 

Knopp, Sarah 240, 247 

Knough, Greg 312 

Knowles, Beverly 343 

Knowles, Patricia 343 

Knowles, Terry .274, 343, 389 

Knowtton, Donald 312, 343 

Knudtsen. Nancy 301 

Koch. Kate 237 

Koch, Nancy 254 

Kocinski, Marlene . ..' 343 

Koehler, Elizabeth ...274, 343 

Koehter, Rick 305 

Koehn, Robyn 343 

Koenig, Richard 343 

Koepp. Carolyn , . ,343 

Koesterer, Kathleen 343 

Koeth, Linda 343 

Kohn, Jacque 261 

Koldcia, Cynthia 343 

Koller, Robert 240 343 

Kolombatovlch, Christina 343 

KoltonskI, Frank 241 

Koncal, Christine ■. 272 

Kondlk. Suzanne 343 

Kondo, Maurice 343 

Konopka, David 256, 343 

Konrodt. Skip 305 



Kontra, James 241 

Kontur, Ronald 239 

KonovoHnka, Glenn 307 

Kenya, Lawrence 304, 343 

Koonce Hall 218 

Kopcsik, Sally 343 

Kopp, Judith 294 

Kerb Hall ..219 

Korthals, John 343 

Kosiba, Lawrence 241 

Kosisky, Ronald 280 

Koss, Margaret 343 

Koterba, Sherry 285 

Kotok, Mark 343 

Ko+owskI, iMichael 271 

Kott, Jane 343 

Kotula, Christine 271, 343 

Kouba, Mary - 343 

Kovach, Eugene .'. ..304 

Kovalak, Kathleen 343 

Kovatch. John 343 

Koiack, Susanne 247 

Kozlch, John : 245 

Kozlowski, Emilie 343 

Kraft, Harrison 343 

Kramanak, Jean 343 

Kramer, Beryl 247 

Kramer, Charles 343 

Kramer, Edward 343 

Kramer, Marcia 343 

Krand, Kathleen 289 

Kraus, Ky : 317 

Krause, Donna 343 

Krehblel, Clayton '. 160 

Krehbiel, Johanna 256 

Kreiner, Albert 343 

Krelsler, Jack 343 

Kreici. Michael 269 

Krejcier, Kathy 343 

Krempasky, Karen 343 

Kresge, James 258, 344 

Krisch. Sherry 268 

Kroger, Richard 314, 344 

Krok, Richard 319 

Krumel, Jane 237 

Krumel, Richard 344 

Krumpe. Peggy 344 

Krupa, Raymond 344 

Krupitzer. Paul 344 

Kubacki, Carol 248, 277,298 

Kubany, Rosanne ^ 344 

Kubik, Marlene 344 

Kucharson, Linda 344 

Kucyk. Kathleen 344 

Kuehne, Patricia 344 

Kuhn. James , , 320 

Kuhn, Nancy 344 

Kula, George 244 

Kunst, Robert . .„ ,. . . : 238 

KunA Brian 344 

Kurilla. Paulette 295 

Kurtz, Beverly 293 

Kuta, Paula .~ 344 

Kutinsky, George 344 

Kutler, Jocelyn 246 

Kutney. Dorothy ....344 

Kuzma, Ronald '. 344 

Kyte, Charles 344 

Kyttler. Teresa 268. 297, 344 

L 

Labln. Linda 344 

Lacki, Ralph 344 



Ladd. Patrick 276. 305 

Ladwig, Gail 344 

LaFleur, Rxhard 238, 344 

Laggeris, Helen 344 

Lake Hall 220 

Lakso, Thomas 344 

Lamb, Bobbie Jean 279 

Lamb. Karen 245 

Lambert, Barbara 286 

Lambros, James 344 

Lamplla, Ann 344 

Lampus, Mdfrtha 344 

Landoll, Cherylann 344 

Landoll, Leo 344 

Landy, Deborah 263 

Lange. Deborah 294 

Lane, Barbara 261 

Laney, Maureen 237 

Lang, Joan 344 

Langenbacher, Linda 256 

Lansett, Christopher 344 

Langsett, Ellen 344 

Lapp, Miriam 242 

Laquldari, Vince 256 

Laredo, Ruth 162 

Larosa, Joan 270, 282 

Larsen, George 319 

Lascheld, Mary 344 

Laska, Bill 316 

Laskoudo, Mark 260 

Lassak. Stephen 344 

Lassmart, Carl 344 

Latimer, Cynthia ; . .344 

Lattet, Keith 313 

Laubacher, Jerome 344 

Laudel. Barbara 344 

Laudig, Beth 344 

Laudig, John 344 

Laurels 246 

Laurenzano, John 239, 24t, 344 

Laurenzi, Barbara : .285 

Lavrlha, William ....: 344 

Lawlor. James i. .253 

Lawrence, Holly 344 

"" Lawrence, Phyllis 344 

Lawson, James ' 344 

Layman. Scott 239 

Laymon, Allen 344 

Layno, Delphine 344 

Lazarus, Doreen 250, 345 

Lazarus, Michael 246 

Lazarus, William 251, 274, 345 

Lazenby, John 345 

Lecso, Janie ". .345 

Lecy, Mary 345 

Ledgerwood, John 239 

Ledyard, Susan 245, 240, 292 

Lee. Karen 345 

Lee, Peter 238, 345 

Leebfick Hall 221 

Leesburg, Mona , 283 

Lehtonen, Marlene 345 

Leib, Barbara •: 345 

Leininger. Mary 345 

Leinweber, Judith 242 

Leii. Diane 283, 345 

Lemasters, Dorothy , , 345 

Lembo, Bernada 345 

Lemmo, Nicholas 345 

Lenahan, Christine 294 

Lenarcic, Josette 345 

Lenart. John 249 

Lenhardt, Gayle 345 



Lenti. Carol 345 

Leonard. Joseph 345 

Leonard, Mae 2? I 

Less, Barbara 345 

Less, JoAno 345 

Lester, Linda 2B3, 345 

Lettau, Marion 345 

Levenson, Lynn 345 

Levlne, Marian 345 

Levine, Sharon 345 

Levis, Nancy 246. 284, 312, 345 

Levy, Andrea 345 

Lewan. James 345 

LewandowskI, Terisia 277, 3IB. 345 

Lewasine, Jordan 290 

Lewis. Frank 345 

Lewis, Maria 345 

Lewis, Richard .". , 24<] 

Liber. Jeffrey 279 

Lrbertore, Pamela 345 

Liberfore, Tony 281 

Lichtenberg, Elaine 270 

Lldon, Judith 283. 345 

Lidon, Sheila 302 

Lieberman, Richard - 345 

LIfset, Roberta 345 

Liggins, Mary 345 

Likar, Mary 345 

Lillback. Larry "..345 

Lilley, Pixie 289 

Lillis, Steve 304 

Limann, Arthur 345 

LIndecamp, Mark 308, 345 

Linehan, Pamela 345 

Ling, William 345 

Link, Dana 345 

Lint, Janet 286 

LIpcsik, Joseph 304 

Lips, Peter 345 

Lipski, Gail 345 

Liquid Crystals 166 

Lisle. Linda . . .- 345 

Lister, Pamela 245, 246, 26B, 277, 293, 345 

Little, David 313 

Little. Glenn 345 

Littleton, Dixie 346 

Littman, Elliott ■ 346 

Livingston, Clyde 346 

Lloyd, Sally 7. 282 

Lloyd, Susan 346 

Loch, Melinda 237, 292 

Lockwood. Timothy 251, 346 

Locy, Don 280 

Loeffel, John 346 

Logan, Jeff 253 

Lohman, Lynn 293 

Lorr.bardI, Linda 250, 346. 389 

Lombardo, Anthony 346 

Lombardo, Janet 277 

Lommler, Robert '. 346 

Lonbardo, Paula 287 

London, Sheila 291 

Long, Charles , 346 

Long. Cheryl 281 

Long, Gregory 3|j, 346 

Long. Natalie 270, 346 

Lonsway, Carol 302 

Lonsway, Joanne 303 

Loom's, Larry 301 

Loomis. Stan 346 

Looney, Larry 346 

Loria, Lucinda 346 

Lorkowski, Maryann 346 



Lorson Jr, Howard 344 

LoRusso, Joseph 346 

Lossing, John 308 

Loudon, Chrlstin 344 

Love, Dorothy 346 

Lovelace, Mark 312 

Loveland, Marilyn 273, 346 

Lovell, Robert 239 

Lovett, Carole . , 244 

Lowery, Marcia 346 

Lowery, Steven 238 

Lownik, Terry 266 

Lowther. Dal© 346 

Loya, Charles 239 

Lubisch, Sandor 247, 313, 344 

Lucarelli, Grace 346 

Lucas, Janet . 346 

Lucas, Memory 346 

Lucci, Richard 346 

Luce, Rebecca ,283 

Ludwig, Barbara 346 

Ludwig, Sue 346 

Luebbers, Rosemary 346 

Luley, William 320 

Lundberg, David 322 

Lundgard, Donald 255,312 

Lupla, Ralph 346 

Lupinacci, Carl 344 

Lustgarten, M'tchell 246, 346 

Lutz, Catherine 240 

Lutz, Gerald 346 

Lutz, Susan 237 

Lutz, Tom 315 

Lyie. Jim 314 

Lyons, Donna 262 

Lyons, Laura 254 

Lyons, Pamela 300 

Mc 

Mc Adams, Kay 346 

McAllister, Jim . . . . ^. * 300 

McArthur, John 260, 261 

McBride, Kathleen 246, 346 

McCallum, Betty 346 

McCarrell Jr., Guy 346 

McCartney, Janice 346 

McCarver. Donna 270, 346 

McChesney, Roger 346 

McClelland. Linda " 344 

McCloud. William 241 

McColgan. Darlene 346 

McConnell. James „. .346 

McCord, John 321 

McCorkle. Marjorie 346 

McCormlck, Nicola 346 

McCoy, Billy 281 

McCoy, Eugene 347 

McCoy, Linda 295 

McCoy. Michael 347 

McCready, Marty 243 

McDermott, Patrick 347 

McCune, Michael 347 

McDermotf, Mary Brendan 254, 347 

McDermotJ, Patrick 347 

McDonald, Scott 304 

McDonough. Jim 256 

McEthany, Margaret 347 

McElroy. Dyonne 291 

McFadden, Terry 347 

McFarland, Charles 347 

McFerren, Patricia , 262 

McGaughran, Stuart 316 



McGeary, Jean .' 347 

McGee, Pat 283 

McGhee, Henry 347 

McGivney, Mary Jane 2BB. 347 

McGrath, Barbara 283 

McGrew, Thomas 384 

McGuIre, Melinda 347 

McGwire III. William 387 

Mclntyre, Rebecca 347 

McKeever, Gayle 347 

McKellar, Dan .' 255 

McKenna. Ellen , 283 

McKinnell. Kent 347 

McLane, Diana 251 

McLean III, Gardner 250 

McLaughlin, Kathleen 270 

McMahon, Sherilyn 347 

McMannis, JoAnn 287, 305 

McMichael, Evelyn 290 

McNab, Kathle 314 

McNally, Terrence 347 

McNees, Ronald 274, 347, 383 

McPherson, Marsha 347 

McSweeney Hall 222 

McWhinney, Tod 347 

M 

Maas, Bruce 255, 247 

Maahs, Sharon" : 257 

Macaul, Sherry 347 

Macaulay, Lynne 284, 347 

Mace, Ronda 347 

Macek, Steve 260 

Macey, Judith 347 

Macica, James , 347 

Mack, Glenna .347 

Mack Jr., Guy 347 

Mackellar. Dawna 347 

MacKellar. William 305 

Mackin. Kathleen 347 

Macnamara, Mark 304 

Macraild, Susan 347 

Magargee, Jane , 347 

Magyar. Sandra 271, 347 

Majewskl. Walter 347 

Major Events Committee 243 

Malandro, Barbara 257 

Malandro, Loretta 277 

Malek. Jean 347 

Malik, Roberto 260, 347 

Malifi. Kenneth '. 254. 347 

Mallet, Bonnie 271 

Mallett, Terry 280 

Mallett, Virginia 347 

Mallon, Fred 313 

Malloy. Tony 312 

Maione. Pamela 274 

Mamujeo, Mustaali 259 

Mancino, Douglas 267. 347 

Manchester Hall 222 

Mandel, Renee 347 

Mandela. Lois 347 

Manduke. Robert 347 

Manfrass, Theodore ; 347 

Mangano, Anthony 347 

Manglno, Patrick 347 

Manley, Marilyn 347 

Mann'ng, Karen 273 

Manning, Michael 347 

Mantarro, Teresa 347 

Mantegna, Gerald 347 

Manlsch, Elaine 271, 348 



Manuj, Georgann 343 

Maravich, Sam 309 

Marczak, Robert 348 

Margerum. Jane 343 

Margolls, Robert 343 

Marietta, Richard 343 

Mark. Frank 343 

Markley, Linda 343 

Marks, Linda 343 

Marks, Robert 348 

Marks, Ruby 343 

Markusika, Jack ' .343 

Marquard, Ann 266 

Marquart, Deborah 27( 

Marr, Janet 270 

Marrone, Robert .\2BI, 348 

Marshall. Catherine 293, 348 

Marshall, Ronald 348 

Martelet, Candy 343 

Martens, David 273, 348 

Martin, Carol 283 

Martin, Dona 297, 343 

Martin, Gregory .' 343 

Martin, Thomas 247, 323 

Martin. William 348 

Marvin, Claudia 272 

Mascia, Josephine 348 

Maser, Lauren 348 

Mason, Cam 270 

Massey, Terr! 290 

Mast, Thomas 315 

Mastriana, Robert 308 

Mathew, Rachel 348 

Mathls, Richard 348 

Matie, Charlene 348 

Mattingly, Faye 348 

Maurm, Bill 258 

Maxa, Donald 303 

May, Claudia 348 

May, Cynthia ,245, 265, 348 

May, James 318 

May, Margaret 348 

Maydak, Cornel 258 

Mayer, John 260 

Mayhall, Deborah 314 

Mayhall, Linda , ,■ 343 

Meyher, John 264 

Mayo, Pamela 283 

Mazarik, Kathleen : 265. 348 

Mazu.-, Merldith 285 

Mazzotta, Kathy .,348 

Meder, Richard 348 

Meeker, Richard 348 

Mees, Sandra 268, 298, 348 

Meeton, Davis 348 

Meeting, Marilyn 348 

Megash, Samuel 259 

Mehling, Sally 348 

Meier, Dr. August 182 

Meisel, Robin 246 

Merster, Thomas 253 

Meleney, James 269 

Melvin, Sharyn 348 

Menegay, Ronald 348 

Menge, Christine 286, 348 

Mengel. Barbara 272 

Mercavich. Charles 348 ' 

Merker, James 302 

Mermer. Dolly 268 

Mertus, Leslie 348 

Mervar, Thomas 311 

Mestetiko, James ^ 348 

directory/201 



Metcalf Hall 223 

Metcalf, Karen 295, 348 

Metro, Kathleen 348 

Metyk, Sharon 348 

Metzdori. William 349 

Metiler. Barbara 260, 279 

Meuche, Robert 349 , 

Meyer, Ellen 293 

Meyer, Kathy 277, 287 

Meyer,' Leslie 349 

Meyers, Ellen 349 

Miceli, Sandy 349 

Michael, Mariann 296 

Michaels, Mary Jane 349 

Michaels, Timothy 349 

Michalak. Michael 247 

MIchalec, Jane 349 

Michaux, Elizabeth 349 

MtchauK, Liz 297 

Michener, James 250 

Miklausich, Joyce 349 

Miklovic, Kathleen 262 

Mikolajciyk. Sigmund 349 

Mikolic. William 349 

Miles, Phil 256 

Milke, Gordon 349 

Milkovich, Daniel 300 

Millay, Jan 302 

Miller. Anne 268 

Miller, Carol ..' 282 

Miller, Charles 349 

Miller, Christine 274,349 

Miller, Diane 349 

Miller, Jennifer 245, 349 

Miller. Jill 242, 262 

Miller, John 276,319 

Miller, Linda 349 

Miller, Marc -, 349 

Miller, Margaret 349 

Miller. Uary Ann 262, 271 

Miller, Maxine 262 

Miller, Robert 349 

Miller, Ronald 349 

Miller, Sally 349 

Miller, Sandra 349 

Miller, Scott 314 

Miller, Susan ...250, 274, 349 

Miller, William 245, 349 

Miller, Wilma 349 

Millett, Kendall :.349 

Millhoff. Patricia 279 

Mills, Michael 349 

Milne, Karen . 265, 284, 312, 349 

Milner. James 349 

Mittner, Daniel 255, 320 

Minarcik, Kathi 262 

Minnch. Bruce 245, 265, 349 

Miracle, Barbara 289 349 

MIsheff, Van 349 

Miija, Charles 349 

Miskovic, Spasoje 349 

Mitchal, Saundra ; 291 349 

Mitchall, William '.349 

Mix, Craig 3II_ 349 

Mlodiik, Karen 349 

Mobley, Robert 349 

Mobobrlous Pit .244 

Moecia, Janice 349 

Moeller, Stephen 349 

Mohan, David 239 

Mohr, Ron 258 

Moir, Christine 262 

Mole, Brenda 340 

directory/ 202 



Molosky, James 313 

Monaco, Edward 305 

Montgomery, Brenda 349 

Montgomery, George 258 

Moore, Annette 291 

Moore, Beverly 292 

Moore, Carl : 253 

Moore, Carol 349 

Moore, Deborah 247 

Moore, Jennifer 292 

Moore, Patricia 2p2 

Moore, Paul 349 

Moore, Sharon 349 

Moore, Warren 350 

Moore, William ^ 350 

Morabito. Peter 273, 304 

Moran, MaryBeth 350 

Morby, Mary 350 

Morehead. Linda 271 

Morell, Kathleen 300 

Morgan Craig 245, 279 

Morgenstern, Kirk 280, 350 

Moriarty, Susan 240 

Morris, Jeffrey 350 

Morris, Lynn 301 

Morris, Renee 350 

Morris Jr., Robert 350 

Morrov/, Daniel 319 

Morse, Agnes 350 

Moskaley. Daniel 240, 241 

Mottlce, Susan 271 , 350 

Moulder, Thomas 315 

Mouyard, Madonna 245, 294, 350 

Mower, Ruth 350 

Mowery, James 350 

Moyers, Kim ..269 

Mraz, Joyce 292 

Muczynski, Karen 350 

Mueller, Craig 274, 350 

Mueller, Polly ; 286 

Muha. Barry 255, 312 

Mu lota Sigma 265 

Muir, Cheryl 273, 350 

Muller, Deborah 240 241 

Mullln, Patrick 350 

Mumman, James 350 

Munson, William 280 

Murawski, Joyce 285, 350 

Murin, Karen 350 

Murman, Jim 312 

Murphy, Beverly 294 

Murphy, Kathleen 288 

Murphy, Laura : .291, 350 

Murphy, Thomas !..... 316 

Murray, Kay 294 

Murray, Martha 350 

Music, Patricia 286 

Musselman Hall 224 

Musser, Frank 350 

Myers, Betty Jane 350 

Myers, David 350 

Myers, Dennis 239 

Myers, Rodney 259, 350 

Mysliwiec, Henry 350 

N 

Nabil, Philip 280 

Nacht, Stove 350 

Nader, Albert 350 

Nagel, Cheryr 350 

Nagy, Nancy 350 

Nalepka, Claire 350 

Naso, Gracia 350 

Natale, Margaret 350 



Nathanson, Sheila 350 

Naylor, Bruce 350 

Naymik, Susan 350 

Neff, Gregory 350 

Neid, Missy 277 

Neldllnger, Nancy 350 

Nelson. Anita 350 

Nelson, Gary 253 

Nelson, John 269 

Nelson, Karl 318 

Nemeth, Dian 350 

Ness, Sam ., 305 

Nestor. Mark 350 

Neuzll, Mary ' 350 

Neville, Jack 317 

Neville, John 350 

Newcomb, Richard 350 

Newcomer. Thomas 350 

Newell, Kathleen 277 

Newman Center 266 

Newmeyer, Jane 250, 386 

Newmeyer, Sarah 350, 389 

New Student Program 265 

Nrcastro, leanor 351 

Nichols, James 250, 274, 351 

Nicholson. Judith ....254, 3SI 

Nied, Michaetine 351 

Niewlerski, Mary 351 

Nigof?. Geoffrey 351 

Nlgollan, Candice 351 

Niles, John 238 

Nisf, Raymond 351 

Nix, Amy 351 

Noble, Judith ' 248 

Noels, Bill .■ 276 

Nolan, Paul 314 

Noll, Robert 253 

Nolte, Peter 351 

Noon Jr., James 351 

Norcia, Linda 268, 296, 351 

Norrls, Edmund 256, 351 

Norris, Linda ; 35| 

Norrisi, Marie 351 

North, Patricia 351 

Northway, Charles 351 

Norton, Marilyn 351 

Nottingham, Don 245 

Novotny, Elmer |82 

Novotny, Lee 351 

Nowak. Elaine 242, 272 

Nowak, Elizabeth 351 

Nowlln, Steele 351 

Noyes, Linda '. 273, 285 

Nuber, Jim 279 

Nutkin, Jacalyn 351 

Nyer. Mark 351 

Nykolyshyn, Roman ,257 

O 

Obra, Saleh 259, 351 

O'Brien, Father Jim 266 

Ocepek, Linda 351 

Oches, Norman 351 

Ockunzzi, Jan 351 

O'Conner, Terrence 304 

Ocshier, Judyth 351 

O'Donnell, Kathleen 351 

Ogunbona, Samuel 259 

O'Hara, D. Terrence 263, 351 

Oif, Richard 351 

O'Lekas, Ellen 296 

Oleyar, Donna 243,- 296 

Oliver. Jeffrey < 351 

Olson, Beverly 351 



Olson Hall 225 

Olson, Kenneth 261 

Olsianski, Cathy 35] 

Ong, Suzanne 3SI 

O'Neill. Margaret 262 

Opaskar, Helen 351 

Orashan, Allan 314 

Ord, Carol 288, 351 

Order of Omega 267 

Orehovec, John 351 

Orelli, Albert 300, 351 

Orlans, Sandra 351 

Orlowe, Deborah 246 

Orner, Deborah 3I6, 35i 

Orriss, Robert f\ '. .351 

O'Saben, Arlene 351 

Osborne, Marie 35| 

Oslegbu, Patrick 259 

Ostarchvic, Cathy . ..". 351 

Otterson. Dr. Pedor 241 

Overcasher, Becky 351 

Owca, Myra 351 

Owen, Marcia 35 1 

Owens, Daniel 305 

O'Wesney, Linda 352 

P 

Pack. Diane 264 

Page, Susan 242, 254 

Paget, Mike 280 

Paige, Lori 352 

Pala, Victoria 352 

Palmer, David 352 

Palme,-, Joan 298, 352 

Palmer, Richard 3O0 

Palmlerl, David 3I4 

Palumbo, Ann 352 

Panhellenic Council 268 

Paparone. Christine .277, 294 

Paparone, Linda 3|2, 352 

Papay, William 271 

Pappa, Carolyn '. . .' 352 

Paris, Margie 305 

Park. Gary 352 

Park. K 257 

Parker, Bradley 240, 241 

Parker, Nancy '..:' 282 

Parker, Rebecca 352 

Parmenter, W.lliam 352 

Parrlno, Karen 352 

Parrlsh, Gregory 352 

Parsons. Bennett 352 

Parsons. Karen j 352. 

Parson. Lynn 352 

Parsons, Priscilla 258 

Parsons. Ruth ■. 352 

Partyka, Diane 313 

Paskert. Dick 280 

Pasquale, Lawrence 314 

Pasteur, Daria 352, 387 

Pastis, Catherine .' 289, 352 

Pastis, Jacqueline 260 

Pastorelle, Gary 352 

Patrick,^ Laura 254 

Patrick. Vivian 352 

Patterson, Carol 352 

Patterson. Malcolm 280, 352 

Pattie, Steve 308 

Patton, Donald 319 

Patton, Lucy 352 

Paukovich, Joseph 352 

Paul, Carol 352 

Paul, Gary 352 

Paul, JoAnne : 288 



Paul. Kathleen 273. 352 

Paul, Stephen 352 

Paulus, Kurt 314 

Paulus. Linda 352 

Pavio, John 352 

Pavlukovich, Sue 352 

Payne, Donna ■. 290, 352 

Payne, Janet • 352 

Peabody. Robert 250, 27B 

Pearl, Jeffrey 352 

Pearlman, Carol — 352 

Pearson, Bruce 352 

Pearson, Carol 262 

PecV, "blames 352, 387 

Peck, John 352 

Pederson, Terry 26B, 297 

Peeti, Linda 283 

Peglar, Robert 352 

Pegorsch, Cathy 254 

Pekarek, Linda 352 

Pell, Catherine 283 

Peltier, Barbara 352 

Pendergrass, Robert 352 

Pennetl. Debra 312, 352 

Penrod, Daniel 243, 352 

Penrod. Eloise 253, 263 

Pepkin, Charles 352 

Perklch. Diana 284 

Perko. Robert 263. 304 

Perkowski, Carla 286 

Perlman, Julie 352 

Perrine, Susan 283, 317 

Perry, Gail 291 

Pershing Rifles 269 

Petdk, George 312 

Petak, jJancy .... 312 

Pete. Gary 353 

Peterangelo, Susan 353 

Peters, Dian 353 

Peterson, Linda 353 

Petit. Peter 353 

Pet:t, Thomas 380 

Petrapoli. Vince 312 

. Petric, Nancy 353 

Petro-vic, Victor 245, 353 

Petrychik, Dan 315 

Penino, Joseph 304. 353 

Pfaff, Sandra 353 

Pfefferle, Catherine 295 

Phi Alpha Theta 268 

Phi Delta Theta 305 

Phi Epsilon Kappa 280 

Phi Gamma Delta 308, 309 

Phi Gamma Nu 270 

Phi Kappa Theta 311 

Phi Sigma Kappa 312, 313 

Phile, Diane 353 

Phillips. Nell 353 

Phillips, Thomas 276, 280 

Phillips, Ward 270 

Philopena, Mary 353 

Pi Mu Epiilon 271 

Picciano, MaryAnn , .264 

. Piccin, Richard ; 353 

Pickenstein, Mark 353 

Pierce, Ronald : 265, 277 

Pietropaoli, Vince 353 

Pifer, Jeff 280 

Pike, Edward 317 

Pinkerton, John / 353 

Pinkis, Kathy 270, 353 



Piontkowski, Linda 251 

Pipa, Richard 313 

Piper, David 353 

Pitt, Michael 353 

Pittman, Lamont 353 

Pitj, Gerald 257 

Placik, Gary ., 322 

Piatt. Nancy 297, 353 

Plummer, Harry 353 

Plymale. Jay ' .353 

Podboy, Donna 237 

Polack, Joseph 238, 244. 353 

Polakowski. Ronald 311, 353 

Polen, Kyle 292, 353 

Polichene, Evelyn 353 

Polichuk, Michael 353 

Pollacek, Barbara 353 

Pollarine, Joanne 273. 353 

Pontones, Julie 353 

Popa, John , 353 

Popielarczyfc. Barbara 353 

Port. Carol 353 

Porter, Kathryn 262, 353 

Porter, Sandra 247 

Post, Ben 274 

Poston. Linda 353 

Potratz, Patricia 246, 269, 353 

Powe, Maire 353 

Powell, Robert 353 

Powers, Trisha 302 

Powrie III, Frederic 353 

Prajsner, Mark 316 

Preece, Timothy 241 

Prernesberger, Helga 353 

Prentice Hall 226, 227 

Prentice, Kathy 353 

Previte. Joan 353 

Price, James 244, 353 

Price, Ruth 291 

Price, Susan 353 

Prince, Beverly 290 

Prior, Thomas 353 

Proud, William .' 353 

Pnybyla. Carol 278 

Puch, Marilyn 353 

Pudelski, Rosemary 354 

Puhle, Karlin 302 

Puleo, Karen -. 354 

Putnam, Jack ; .354 

Pyle, Rebecca 354 



pu'ckel, Brenda ,i 254 

Quinn, Linda 354 

Quinn, Margaret 354 

R 

Rabe, Debbie 244 

Rabelt, William 354 

Radd, Tommie 354 

Raddish, Judith 354 

Radigan, Robert, 245, 261 

Rafailedes Jr., George .' 354 

Rdlmondi. Lisa 389 

Raines, Bessie 259 

Rakusin, Phyllis 354 

Ramacciato, Ronald 3S4 

Ranftl. Sandra 354 

Rango, D-ennii 280 

Ranz, Mary 3pl 

Rapaport, Sharon 277, 287, 318 



Rausch, Brynith 354 

Raw, Kenneth 354 

Ray, Candace 354 

Ray, William 257 

Rayle, Kenneth 354 

Raymond. James 354 

Raynes. Barbara 293, 354 

Read. Dr. Gerald 183 

Rearick, JoAnn 354 

Reash, Nancy 295 

Rech. Janice 354 

Rechedy, Lawrence ,.264 

Recko, Alan ....354 

Rectenwald, Susan 314 

Reddick, Mary 286 

Reed, Jacqueline 284 

Reed, Teresa ^ .354 

Rees, Frederick 354 

Reese, Gail , 303 

Rehman, Karl 239 

Rehman, Lawrence 354 

Reho, Judith ....271 

Reichert. Helen 2W. , 354 

Reid, Doris 354 

Relkowski Jr., Lester 354 

ReMly, Kathleen 268, 294 

Reiman, Donald c 354 

Rein, Rita 354 

Reinwald, Chris 262 

Rets, Cindy 283 

Remein, Warren 354 

Renn, Deborah 354 

Renner, Thomas 280, 354 

Reno. Judy 277 

Rettenmier. Earl 354 

Reuschling. Thomas 249 

Revezio, John 247 

Rexin, Thomas 354 

Rey, Carolyn J54 

Reydak, Sharron 274, 354 

Reynolds, Shirley 354 

Rezin, Andy 317 

Rhein. Cynthia 354 

Rhinehart, Karln 354 

Rhoades, Jerry 323 

Rhodes, Gerald 354 

Ribenhoff, Ellen 294 

R'ccardi, Karl 354 

Richard, James 354 

Richards, Ginger 292 

Richardson, Linda 288 

Richie, Steve 257 

RIchter, Kurt 354 

Rickety Katherine 354 

Ricksecker. Paul 354 

Rider, Pamela 354 

Ridgeway, John 355 

Ridion, George 355 

Rieder, James 355 

Rieke. Edward .,..! 355 

RIggs, Jan .'' '. 242 

Riley, Daniel 355 

Rinaldl, Marlene 355 

Rinearson, Jeffrey 320 

Rinehary, Carol 355 

Ring, Alan 355 

Ringle, Norma 268, 284, 

RisalitI, Stephen 270 

RIsher, Constance 262, 355 

Ritchie, Edith 290 

Rittichier, Michael 355 



Rivers, Emma , 355 

Robb, James 281 

Roberts, Carolyn 355 

Roberts, Lawrence 251 

Roberts, >(^arian 355 

Roberts, Robert 301, 355 

Roberts. William 300, 355 

Robin, Marjorie 265, 355 

Robinson. Brenda 291 

Robinson, Denlse 290 

Robinson. Diane 355 

Robinson. Jackie 290 

Robinson, Sandi 2W 

Robinson. Sheryl 312 

Robinson, Victoria 247, 355 

Robison, Carle 355 

Robison, Corky 249 

Roche, John 281 

Rocine, Victor 245 

Rock, Shelley 355 

Rockfalus. Shirley ...355 

Roden. James 316 

Rodgers, Timothy 300 

Rodkey, James 267, 305, 355 

Rodon, Raymond 249 

Rodriguez, Mila 355 

Roepke, Deborah 286 

Roeslnger, Janet 285 

Rogalski. Michael 314 

Rogers, Bruce 355 

Roegrs, Kathryn 355 

Rogers, Nancy 355 

Rogers, Vickie 355 

Rogissart, DIanne 355 

Rogolsky, BeHe 355 

Rogovin, Joyce 243, 244, 247, 355 

Rogozin, Linda 355 

Rohrer, Linda 355 

Ro'tblat, Susan ...289 

Rolfe, Laura 355 

Rollins, Kathleen 355 

Romain, William 258 

Roman, Claudia 355 

Romano, Bonito 355 

Romes. Gregory 239 

Romain. William 258 

Root, Catherine 355 

Rose, Larry 274 

Rosebough, Denlse 241 

Rosenberg, Judith 282 

Rosen berry. Janet 355 

Rosenburg. Rita 355 

Rosenfeld, Robert .238. 355 

Rosenstock, Roberta 254 

Ross. Catherine 355 

Ross. David 274, 382 

Ross. Dorothy 355 

Ross. Jill .....355 

Ross. Larry ,. . 244 

Ross, MaryAnn 272 

Ross Jr., Richard 239, 355 

Ross, Ronald 318 

Rossetti, Michael 355 

Roth, Linn 355 

Roth Jr., Louis 355 

Rothacker, Diane 355 

Rothstein, Daniel 271 

Rothwelt, Myrtle .■ 354 

Rowe, Theodore 317 

Rowinsky, Donald 356 

Royal. Kathleen 291 

directory/203 



Rubal, Bernard 356 

Rubin. Rita 354 

Rucker. Beverly 291 

Rucker, James 314, 356 

Rucker, James 314, 356 

Ruda, Jolin ■ 320 

. Ruehl, Ronald 356 

Rufener, Marylou 356 

Ruffini, Franco 356 

Ruffner, Howard 245, 356, 386 

Ruffner. Marquerite 356. 391 

Rude. Sandra 284. 356 

Rufo, William 356 

Rugby 138. 139 

Rundell, Marianna 260, 356 

Rung, Donald 356 

Russ, Timothy ' 365 

Russell, June 356 

Russell, Karen 356 

Rutherford. Dr. Robert 256 

Rutkoff, Ethan 238 

Rut), Kathryn 356 

s 

Sabal, Thomas 241 

Sacco, Toni 247 

SackeH. Charles 264 

Sadler, Karen 356 

Sadlier, Larlene 354 

Saeliler, James 38! 

Safranek, Edward 274 

Sager, Dan 320 

Sahringer, Mellanie 270 

Sailing Club 270 

Sak. Caria 356 

Sak, Richard 356 

Salem, Diane ■ 256, 356 

Salem, Gloria 356 

Sal ley. Sharon 295 

Salyer, Sherry 250 

Sampson. Kay * , . , .356 

Sanda, Joseph 319. 356 

Sanders. Antonius 356 

Sanders. Janice 356 

Sanders, Ward 306 

Sankow. Pamela 356 

Sansky, Pamela 247 

Sansotta, Donald 309, 356 

Santschi, Linda 241, 294 

SantiMi. Frank 356 

Sapen, Dolores 356 

Saporilo, Diane 356 

Sarocco, Diane 286 

Sarollo, Dane 268 

Sarosy. Diane 294 

Saskin, Richard 322 

Sassaman, Nancy 286 

Sauer, D'ane 356 

Sauers. Carl ... 356 

Sauto, Sally 356 

Savarin Jr., Michael 319, 356 

Saxer. Ed 319 

Saxton, Deborah 245, 356 

Scadden, Patricia 276 

Scaffide, Lillian 295 

Scaparotti, Janet .' 237, 277, 292 

Scarborough, Betsy 237, 277, 294 

Scavdis, George 356 

Scebbi, Frances 254 

Scene, Mary . . , 258 

Schaberl. Edward 356 

directory/204 



Schaefer. Deborah 356 

Schaefer, Gerald 256 

Schaefer, John 356 

Schaefer, William 356 

Schaetile, Sue 356 

Schaffer, Cherie 356 

Schano, Donna 296, 356 

Schargorodskr, Leo 245, 261 

Schaub, Kenneth 356 

Scheerer, Ellen 297 

Scheg, Jerome 300 

Scheider, Betsy 299 

Scheiring, Michael 357 

Scherger, Sharon 357 

Scheuermann, Deborah 357 

Scheurmann, Lynn 240 

Schiavone. Louise 357 

Schibler, John 357 

Schick, Thomas 357 

Sch laden. Diana 357 

Schlemmer, Donald 253 

Schlund, Margaret 357 

Schmader, Kathleen 357 

Schmatz, Kathleen 245 

Schmauch, Valeria 262, 357 

Schmid, Carolyn 357 

Schmidt, Mark 357 

Schmidt, Sharon 357 

Schmrtf, Douglas 308 

Schmitz, Janice 251, 274, 387 

Schnieder. June 277 

Schneider. Karen 285 

Schneider, Susan 357 

Schnur, Carol 357 

Schoehnanr, Canie .301 

Schoepe. Richard 357 

Schoolmaster, Andy 313 

Schopfer, Gary 304 

Schroeder, Martin 357 

Schroettinge.*. Karen 357 

Schroth, Barbara 357 

Schuck, Virginia 357 

Schuler, Jeannie '. .283 

Schull, Kristina 314 

Schuller, Georgianne 295, 357 

Schuller, Kathy 295 

Schulte, Joann 250.-274, 357, 389 

Schultz. Arlene 357 

Schultz, Jennifer 295, 357 

Schumacher, Linda 357 

Schuster, James 277 

Schwarm, Susan ...,'. r. 357 

Schwartz, Blair 313 

Schwartz, Larry S ..385 

Schwartz, Nancy , 357 

Schwarz, Barbara 357 

Schwende, Dorothy 288 

Schwenk, Milton 357 

Schworm, Robert 357 

Scobie, Harold 251, 390 

Scolnick, Debra 246 

Scott, Annette , , , , 291 

Scott, Candice 357 

Scott, Carol 270 

Scott, Deborah 357 

Scott, Donald 3I5 

Scott, Susan 357 

Scuba |54_ 155 

Seals, Gary 357 

Searles, Lynne ., 258 

Seber. Joan 357 



Sedgley, Christine 292 

Sedlak. Lynette 357 

See, John 238 

Seeton. John 244, 357 

Seffens, David 320 

Seftick, Kathleen 357 

Segal, Marlene , 357 

Segar. Debby 357 

Seldet, Robert 303 

Sekerak, Lois 357 

Sekkes, Robert 302 

Sell, Marvin 357 

Sell, Suzanne 285, 357 

Selleck, Gerald 357 

Sells, Sandra 284 

Sener, Jeffrey 357 

Senter, Cathy 357 

Serne, William 250, 390 

Setar, John 358 

Seuffert, Christine 298 

Sever, Rudolph 358 

Shafer, Susan 35B 

Shaffer, Jan 358 

Shaffer, Silas 317 

Sharp, Thomas 280, 358 

Shamp, Jean 356 

Shaner. Gennie 358 

Shaner, Pamela 240, 241, 277 

Shank, Larry 358 

Shankman, Nancy 258 

Shannon, Jeanne 289 

Shapiro, Daniel , 258 

Share, Gordon 358 

Sharks 158. 159, 272 

Sharp, Donald 240, 241 

Sharp, Thomas 358 

Sharri^ Tom 358 

Shatto, Cathy .\358 

Shaw, Amy 358 

Shaw, Laurel 294, 358 

Shawn, Kevin 390 

Shearey, Renee 358 

Shebl, Abdulla 259. 358 

Sheer, Mary Ann 180 

Shelton, Donna 358 

Shenosky. Theodore 305 

Shepherd, James 314, 358 

Sheppard, Bruce .302 

Sherbechuk, Joanne 358 

Sherbinsky, Fred 314 

Sher], Dyanne 358 

Sherlock, Dick ', 358 

Sherman, Sue . , '. , , .294 

Sherwood, Kevin 244, 358 

Shibley, Rudd 312 

Shiling, Thomas 279,' 321 

Shisle;, Witlard 305 

Shivock, Margaret 358 

Shoemaker, Linda 358 

Shonk, Susan 358 

Shopbell, Terry 358 

Shotwell, Lawrence ^. 358 

Shreffle,', Carolyn 358 

Shreffler, Patricia 358 

Shrenk, Tina 258 

Shryock, Deborah 250 

Shuff, Larry 323 

Shufflebottom. Charles \ .313 

Shu maker, Oanita 358 

Shomaker, Ruth Ann 248, 269 

Shuman, Ellen 261 



Shumpert, Jaunace 291, 358 

Shumskey, Elaine 3OO 

SIbul. Barry ....239, 358 

Sidbecb, Alan 353 

Sidik, Margaret 35B 

Sledel, Lynn , 303 

Slegel, Barbara 353 

Siekanies, Daniel 255, 304 

Slelatycki. Kenneth 358 

Sigler. Susan 242 

SIgler, Timothy 265, 358 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 314, 315 

Sigma Alpha Eta 273 

Sigma Chi 3|6, 317 

Sigma Delta Chi 274 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 318, 319 

Sigma Tau Gamma , 320, 321 

Sigrisf, Ronald 271 

SIkes, Cynthia 359 

Sikora, Constance 358 

Silva, Kathleen 292, 358 

Sllversten, Harlan 308, 358 

Sima. Dian 35B 

Sima, Joseph - 359 

Simmons, Anne 277 

Simmons, Charles 270 

Simmons, Edwinna 291 

Simmons, Rodney 358 

Simms, Stephen 306 

Simms, Wendy 358 

Simon, Bruce ■. 358 

S'mons. Linda 265, 315 

Simonson, Craig 300 

Simi, Michael 302 

Sinchak, Stephen 358 

Sinclair, Linda 359 

Sinclair, Patricia 359 

Singhaus, Elizabeth 242 

Singleton, James 359 

Sipe, Sandra 359 

Sirey, William 302, 359 

SIrkIn, Barbara 318 

Sirpilla. Cynthia 359 

SIska, James 241 

Siverstsen, Gayle 270 

Sivertsen, Randi 359 

Siwicki, Joe K 359 

Skating Club 275 

Skeggs, Norman 359 

Skeggs, Skip 316 

Skelding, Gary 245. 277, 359 

Skelley, Patricia 359 

Skelly, Mandy -. 248, 359 

Ski Club 274 

Skirmen?, Rodney 359 

Skoch, George 247 

Skrietts, Marie 262 

Skrletts, Rosemarle 359 

Skvarenina. Joseph ,v 321, 359 

Slagle, Paula 359 

Slanina, Jacqueline 318, 359 

Slater. Ann 359 

Slater, Tom 260 

Slocum, William 252, 253, 279 

Slominski, Nancy 261 

Slossher, Bob 258 

Sluka, Barbara 288 

Slutzke;, Roger 359 

Small, John 359 

Small, Michael 359 

Smeach, Meti 321 



Smith. Andrea 359 

Smith. Bruco 23', 359 

Smith, Cheryl 290, 291 

Smith, Edward 25B 

Smith, Hulda 290 

Sm'th. Janis 359 

Smith. Kathleen 359 

Smith, Kalhryn 359 

Smith. Larry 359 

Smith, Lorn 359 

Smith, Lynda ■ 359 

Smith. Margaret 359 

Sm'th. Marilyn 270 

Smith. Mary Beth 359 

Smith. Mary Jane 359 

Smith. Maureen 253 

Smith, Rebecca 247, 301 

Smith, Richard 359 

Smith, Robert 270 

Smith, Runita 291 

Smith. Samuel 238 

Smith, Sharon 291 

Smith, Teresa 271. 359 

Smith, Vincent ;...359 

Smith, William 239 

Smucll. David 359 

Smykil. Kim 359 

Snyder. David '....359 

Snyder. Michael 359 

Snyder, Robert 359 

Snyder. Robert John , 359 

Soboslay, Nancy 299 

Soccer 144, 145 

Sochor, Thomas 359 

Socky. Sharon .359 

Soedef, Joan ..359 

Sofia. Marsha 359 

Sokol. Gerard 359 

Solar. Julie 359 

Solodar, Cynthia 359 

Sommers, Judith 360 

Sommers, Dr. Ronald 181 

Sospirato. Madeline », 36C 

Souder, Kim 292 

Soules, Donald 360 

Source. Pat 258 

Sovchik, Douglas 360 

Spaan. Diana 360 

Spahlinger, Robert 360 

Speck. Barbara ....360 

Speck, Ronald 360 

Speece. Daniel 319 

Sperling, Lawrence 360 

Spicer. Kirby 360 

Spiga. Alberta 360 

Spilios, Linda 360 

Spindle. Deborah 247. 360 

Spoerf, Albert ^..264 

Sprague, Robert ,. 360 

Sprance. James 360 

Sprenger. Carl , 360 

Springer. Lynda 360 

Squeglia, Marie 360 

Stacy, Doris 360 

Stagerwald, John 314 

Stahl, Patricia : 360 

Stahler, Karen .' .360 

Staley. Janet 242. 360 

Stamets. Jon 239, 312 

Stamm, Patricia 360 

Stana. Richard 318 



Stanbarger, Lynne 360 

Standerwick, Susan 360 

Sankovic, Barbara 360 

Stankowskl. Susan 360 

Stanley. Thomas 360 

Staniiale, Addolorat 360 

Stapf. Claire 247, 297 

Stark, Nancy 360 

Starling. Daniel 360 

Starman. Nancy .; 360 

Starr. Rita 360 

Stauffer. Linda 360 

Steele, Jon 360 

Stefanik. Terrence 360 

Stefanu, Robert 360 

Steffy, William 321 

Steiger Jr.. Rod 360 

Stein. Rudy 360 

Stein. Sherry 360 

Steiner. Mutfie 247. 300 

Steiskal, Richard 280. 360 

Stellar. Joe 245 

Stentl. Marilyn 360 

Stephenson, Kathleen 254. 282 

Sterlekar, Ronald 254. 264, 360 

Stevans. Tricia 313 

Stevens. Helen 319 

Stevens, Pepper 261 

Stevenson. Donna 285 

Steverson. Carolyn 36C 

Stewar, Hall .228 

Stewart, Barbara .■ 291 

Stewart, Pamela 260 

Stewart, Skip 307 

Stewart, Robert 309 

Stewart, William 240, 241, 360 

Stilwell, Wende 268, 298 

Stinson, William 360 

Stitt, Susan 360 

Stocker. Jeanne ..., 360 

Stoffer. Bonnie , 361 

Stoffer. Kathy 361 

Stoffer. Ronald 316, 3(1 

StoIoH. David .'.319, 361 

Stokes Jr., Arthur 281, 361 

Stoklas. Jerry ; 390 

Stone, Richard 361 

Stoner, Michael 361 

Stone:. Nancy 247 

Stopher Hall 229 

Stouffe,-. Shelley .'. 282 

Stout. Martha 247 

Stover. Maxine 290 

Stratman. Mark 318 

Stratton, Robert 311 

Stress. Kenneth 239 

Stricklen. Jean 244 

Strimbu, Rebecca 361 

StritoS, Sandra 361 

Strobel, Andrew 361 

StrobI II. Engelbert 36! 

Stroh. Alice 361 

Stroup. Linda 361 

Stroup. Phillip 361 

Strukel, Sandra 361 

Student Activities Board 277 

Student Education Assoc 278 

Student Projects of Today 274 

Student Senate 279 

Student Senate Exec. Board 279 

Stull. Mary 36/ 

Stylinskl, Carl 281 



Suarez, Carlos 361 

Suchy, George 361 

Sugar. Robert 361 

Sukosol, Vorasak 361 

Sulih, Alton 361 

Sullivan. Kenneth 264 

Sullivan. Robert 247. 361 

Suloff, Paul 361 

Surovy. Judith 361 

Sussman, Sandra 361 

Sutton, Kathleen 361 

Swaffield, Bruce 260, 261 

Swanson, Sharon ..273, 361 

Swanson, Susan 282, 284 

Swarti. Stewart 32! 

Sweeny, Paul 256, 361 

Sweet. Donna 254 

Swclik. Frank ...383 

Swerline. Lee 361 

Swiecickl. Dolores 292 

Swiger. Jose 312 

Swiger. Lee 312, 361 

Swimming 156. 157 

Swinehart, Crysann 256, 361 

Sye, Moozen 361 

Sykes, William 239 

Szafranski, Chris 361 

Szaraz, Lynn 266,361 

Szczech, Judith 361 

Szenas, Susan 361 

Szerdy, Betty 361 

T 

Tdbar. Andrew 240, 241 

Tadej. Gerald ine 277 

Taiclet, Jean 277 

Tajkowski, Ellen 263 

Talmadge, Susan 361 

Tannenbaum, Debra 361 

Tapleshay, Linda 361 

Tarbet, John 249 

TartagMa, Lynn 361 

Tatalovlch, Bert , 361 

Tate, Yvonne 36 1 

Tau Kappa Epsllon 322, 323 

Taub, Evelyn 361 

Taylor, David 361 

Taylor, James 2BI, 361 

Taylor. Jeffrey 267, 307, 361 

Taylor. Kathryn 361 

Taylor, Lawrence 362 

Taylor, Leatrice 254, 362 

Taylor, Margarette 3*2 

Taylor, Susan 257 

Tebbe, John 312 

Tecco, April 1 362 

Tedrick, Ted '- 304 

Tegner, George 30* 

Telchert, Paul 280 

Teleky, Carol 362 

Telirow, Brian : . . .362 

Teminsky, Carole 362 

Tempter, Carl 270 

Temu. Melickiiedeck 259, 362 

Temuru, Richard - 259 

Terrace Kail 230, 231 

Tennis 20, 21 

Tepper, Wendy 242, 297 

Terhune, Sara 263 

Terry, Juanita 362 

Thiel. Carolyn 362 



Thial, Penny 294 

Thiele, Fred 303 

Thiersch, Gail 272 

Thomas. Deneane 362 

Thomas, Kim 277, 318 

Thomas, Marilyn 270, 295 

Thomas, Patricia 317 

Thomas, Penelope 362 

Thompson, Ann 289 

Thompson, Barbara 294 

Thompson. John 342 

Thompson. Romona 318 

Thompson, Terry 304 

Thompson, William 362 

Thorn. Douglas 281 

Tiffany. Patricia 299. 342 

Tifford, Anne 271, 342 

Tipton, Jack 317 

Tirlea, Resa 256 

Tirpak, Andrew 362 

Tishler. Harriet 362 

Tjaden, Bonnie 342 

Tobin, Noreen 362 

Tokari, Joan 362 

Tolliver, Lafe 245, 251, 362 

Tomaiin, Karen 362 

Tomer. MaryJo 295 

Tomlinson, Jeffrey 362 

Tompkins, Lynne , 292, 362 

Tompkins. Dr. Phillip 183 

Tomsic, Lois 362 

Torch. Glenn 362 

Torch, Ronald '. 249, 362 

Toth, Kathleen ■ 342 

Townsend. Donna 277 

Toye, Judith 272 

Track 24, 25, 26, 27 

Trauben, Dennis 250 

Treckel, Paula 277 

Tressler, Jan 285 

Trevan. Karen 290 

Trickett, Howard 342 

Triff, Wesley 323 

Trimble, Meryl 291 

Troshane, Elizabeth .391 

Troxell, Bonnie 362 

Trucksis, Father Fred 246 

Trueman, William 342 

Tsangeos, Kathy 362 

Tuffy. Catherine 288 

Turcola. Steve 241 

Turk, Laurence 362 

Turnbull. Marilyn 290 

Turner, Gregory 313 

Turner, Linda 294 

Turner, Lyie 313 

Turner, Paul 270, 342 

Turner, Robert 267 

Tusek, Kathleen 342 

Tussel, Clarence 244 

Tussey, Robert 3*2 

Twark, Barbara 342 

Twin-Towers 232, 233 

U 

Udovic, Frank 362 

Uehlein. Wayne 321 

Ugochukwu, Promise 259 

Uhler. James 362 

Uhlmann. Gary 362 

Ullman. Michael 258 

directory/205 



Ulm, Kathy 342 

Ulmer, Marcia "2 

Unger, James 380 

Unkefer, Gregory 3*2 

Urban, Leo 342 

Urvan, Kenneth 342 

Utile,-, Ronald 305, 342 

Uusttupa, Tellervo 242 

V 

Vaccaro, Gary 304, 343 

Valildieck, Jane 2'0 

Valicenti, Thomas 314. 343 

Valore, Anthony 308, 343 

VanBourgendien, Robert 305 

VanCampen Hall .....234 

VanKirk, Albert 280 

VanOver, Geraldine 343 

VanStckle, Charles , 343 

Varketta, Victoria ; 254, 343 

Varner, Scott 307 

Vasatio Thomas 249 

Vasel, Edward 343 

Vasilenko, Nancy 242 

Vaughn, Karen 273 

Vaughn, Keven 28», 343 

Velei, Eva 249 

Verbeck, David 258 

Verder Hall .-234, 235 

Verina, Michael 343 

Verina, Nicholas 343 

Vervoort, Susan 314 

Veterans Assoc - 280 

Vidd, Jerome 254, 343 

Viger, Janio 343 

Villers, Virgil 343 

Vincent. Diane 343 

Vinciguerra, Kenneth 343 

Visintainer, Rebecca 343 

Vitas, Anita 343 

Vocca, Joseph 343 

Vogel, Jacquelyn 343 

Vogel, Myra 102 

Volas, t^ary 343 

Volmelker, Rose 181 

Volpe. Randall 250, 343 

Votypka, Carol 343 

Vyrostek, Thomas 343 

w 

V/ade, Dorothy 343 

Wade, JoAnn ;/ 27Z 

Wade, Lavita ,~...29G 

Wagner. James ^ 343 

Wagner, Judy 343 

Wagner, Rebecca 294 

Wahlers. Janice 343 

Wahna, Annette 343 

Waite, Dennis 343 

Walkanovich, Alex 321 

Walker, Jane 257 

Walker, Milton 239, 343 

Walker, Susan 295 

Wallace, Christine 294, 343 

Wallace, Claire 343 

Waller, Stephen 343 

Walsh, Marlene 343 

Walters, Debbio 343 

Walters, T. J. 247 

Walton, Mary 343 

Walton, Patricia 343 

c!irectory/206 



Wanglor, Kenneth 363 

Ward, Keith 261 

Ward, Fletcher ' 240, 343 

Warman, Wendell 343 

Warnement, Jerry 245, 244, 343 

Warner, Donald 363 

Warner, Fredrick 343 

Warofka, Linda 343 

Warren, Richard 300 

Washio, Kenneth 343 

Wasshanun, Gretchen 272 

Watkins, Cynthia ' : . . .295, 363 

Watkins, Skip 314 

Watson, Avis 343 

Watson, Jean 271 

Watson, Jeffrey 363 

Watts, Michael 364 

Wawrin Jr., Andrew 364 

Way, Bruce 364 

Weade, Elaine 344 

Wear, Tracye 344 

Wearsch, Gary -. 344 

Weaver, Linda . .,. 2'4 

Webb, Larry 364 

Webb, Susan 364 

Webber, Glenda ......364 

Weber, John 316, 364 

Weber, Patricia 288, 364 

Week, Martha 364 

Wedler, Lynn 284 

Weidner, George 314 

Weil, Kathyrn 237 

Weimer, William 256, 364 

Weiner, Al 280 

Weinhardt, Robert .344 

Weinrieb, Robin 344 

Weinum, Thomas 306 

Weisenburg, Kathleen ' 344 

Weiss, Janet 344 

Weiss, Roberta 344 

Welsthal, Norman 281 

Weitiner, Cindee '. 344 

Welbaum, Scott 344 

Welker, Helmut 255 

Wells, David ...238 

Wells, Donna 364 

Welling, Wayne 258 

Wenger, Roy 364 

Wensteni, Howard 260 

Weni, Kathy 364 

Werger, Patricia 344 

Werne,-, Nancy 283 

Weslow, John • 305 

West, Betty 290 

West, Susan 271, 344 

West, Terri 364 

Westerfeld, Joanne 364 

Weston, Marty 250 

Wheeler, Richard 364 

Wheeler, RoseMarie 364 

Wheelock, Clarijo 364 

Whipple, Connie 364 

Whisman, Hugh 345 

Whisner, Roxana . , . :' 248, 364 

Whitbeck, William 364 

White, Dennis 247, 364 

White, John 344 

White, Loring 364 

White, Martha 290 

White, Robert 304 



White, Pros. Robert 1 68, 69. 70, 71, 72, 73 

Whiteleather, Kathy 247, 364 

Whiting, Tim 306 

Whitmer, David 364 

Whitmire, Pamela 344 

Whitten, Dianna 291 

Wiant, Keith 364 

Wichman, David 364 

WIesenann, Jacquelyn 272 

Wilcox, Leslie 364 

Wiley, Pamela 258, 364 

Wilfong, Virgil 364 

Wilkin, Cynthia 240 

Wllklns, Karen ....'. 344 

Will, Walter 344 

WilKorc^, Anita 254, 364 

Williams, David 320 

Williams, Gary 269 

Williams, Eugene 274, 364 

Williams, Janet 364 

Williams, Libbey 291 

Williams, Linda 295, 365 

Williams, Nancy 388 

Williams, Ola 291 

Williams, Patricia 364 

Williams, Randy 345 

William!, Rebecca 288 

Williamson, William 345 

Willis, Mark- 345 

Wills, Fred 239 

Wilson, Barbara 345 

Wilson, Camile 290 

Wilson, Ellen 345 

Wilson, Jane 252, 284, 305 

Wilt, Michael 281 

WInen, Peter 390 

Winfield, Terry 345 

Winkler, Judy 345 

Winner, David 345 

Winton, Allx ^ 287, 315 

WIrick, Carol '. 365 

Wise, Janette 345 

Wiseman, Don 239 

WIsnIewski, Barbara 365 

Wittmeyer, Edward 365 

WKSU TV i Radio 281 

Wotno, Geraldine 237 

Wojton, Francine i.. 301 

Wolf, Kenneth 365 

Wolfe, Carol 254 

Wolfe, Joh'n 320, 365 

Wolfe, Phyllis 288 

Wolfo 111, Shuey '■ 365 

Wolfson, David 281 

Wolslager, Barbara 365 

Women's Recreation Assoc 282 

Wong, Kally 271 

Wood, Douglas 256, 345 

Wood, Stephanie 291, 365 

Woodbridqe, Lois 298, 365 

Woodin, Linda 345 

Woodring, David 345 

Woods, Christine 284 

Woods, Janet 365 

Woody, Albert 345 

Wooten, Chris 288 

Woric, John 320 

Worloy, Jeanette 365 

Worley, Paul 316 

Worling, Diane 302 



Wozniak, Dennis 302 

Wrestling 146, 147, 148, 149 

Wright, Dennis 26? 

Wright, Diane 365 

Wright, Randy 307 

Wright, William 314, 345 

Writsel, Laura 237 

Wucinick, Nancy 277 

Wurl, Kurt 314 

Wyant, Jeffrey 365 

WysiyanskI, Janette 365 

Y 

Yakim, Darlene 282, 365 

Yamaoda, Ichiro 365 

Yantorn, Nicholas 365 

Yarosh Jr., John 365 

Yates, Norman 303 

Yee, Phillip 239, 241, 365 

Yee, Wilminq 279 

Yee, William 247 

Yoder, Joseph 365 

Yosay, John 319 

JosfJr., John 365 

Young, Debra 248,277 

Young, Haiel 297 

Young, James 365 

Young, Kathleen 365 

Young, Kenneth 365 

Young, Melinda . .". 294 

Young, William 365. 

Youngman, Cheryl 365 

Yu, Rosalind 365 

Yuska, Lynn 277 

z 

iadesky, Kathleen 246, 365 

Zafarana, Kathleen 365 

Zahler, Joseph 365 

Zahorec, Debra 294 

Zak, Mary Ann 289 

Zaie, Lawrence 257 

Azienski, Patricia 365 

Zaienski, Patricia 365 

Zangara, James 366 

Zatski, Joan - • .313 

Zavacky, Jeanette .-285 

Zborowski, Germaine 366 

Zelch, David 366 

Zeldne,-, Michele 279 

Zelenka, JoAnn 366 

Zera, Richard 344 

Zlarko, Karen 344 

Zielaskiewici, Kenneth 344 

Zieike, Patricia 364 

Zigmond, Victoria 366 

Zigmu), Cheryll 284 

Zimmer, Christie 366 

-Zimmerman, Jill 297,-313, 365 

Zimmerman, Sharon 366 

Zink, Larry ' ....255, 314 

Zink, Mandy 245 

Zink, William 308, 366 

Zitek, Hildy 272 

Zoretich, Kenneth 300 

Zwick, Bruce 344 

Zwingter, Roger .". 309, 344 

Zwolinski, Kathy 344 




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V L 







I. L. Bodnar. 2. G. 
Wojno, 3. G. Harris, 4. 
K. Olshong, 5. 0. 
Podboy, president; 6. 
K. Koch, 7. A. David, 
a. J. Krumel, 9. L. 
Wrilael. 10. R. Clay. 

II. P. Elben. 12. J. 
Grimth. 13. M. Corso, 
14. S. Decker, 15. S. 
Lutz, 16. M. Loch, 17. 
J. Scaparotll. 18. K. 
Gedeon. 19. S. Hach- 
tel. 20. B. Scar- 
borough, 21. K. Well, 
22. M. Laney 



J:..^i^.*KA. i. 1.1. i: 



olpho lomb- 
do delta 



Girls are chosen spring quarter of their freshmen year for Alpha Lambda Delta, freshmen women's 
honorary; they must have a 3.5 or above grade point average In their flrsl two quarters at Kent. This 
year's members pledged In spring, but went active as sophomores In NovemtMr when they reorganized 
for the election of officers. Projects since fall were the "Clothe a Child— Warm a Heart" donation 
drive. Individual tutoring and as a spring break project, members went to their hometown high schools 
to encourage students to atterKl a university for the betterment of higher education. Traditions Include 
formal pledging where each girl receives a red and yellow ribbon, and formal Initiation with pins 
and certificates of merit. 



alpha lamda delta/237 







IF' 



aal 



olpho 
phi omego 



The men 3 service Iralernlly, Alpha Phi Omega, was founded 23 years ago as an eHorl to serve the campus and community. 
Consisltng of 25 active members, the tralernity has pro|ect8 such as making student desk blotters, and working lof (he 
Bloodmoblle Organizations that find APhlOs as tielpers are Hudson Boys School and Ihe Happy Day School, One of its 
■fion-Iraternlty ■ traditions is getting each quarters pledges to acquaint themselves and show Interest in Ihe organization, 
in return lor not Ijeing hazed While service projects are of top priority, social events consist ol card game marathons, and 
meeting Gamma Sig girls The fraternity Is open lo all men. 



alpha phi omega/238 





olpho 
eto rho 



with a local banquet and Held trips, especially one lo Oberlip, Alpha Eta Rho worked 
to increase its membership. Founded in 1969. Kent's Kappa Alpha chapter is a professional 
aerospace group directly associated with the aerospace industry. 




1. P. Yee. 2. R. Carpenter. 3. F. Wilts, 4. B. Sibul. 5 R. Lovell, 6- H. Blind, 7. 
J. Slamets. 8, M Walker. 9. D. Frame, 10, J Laurenzano. 11. R. Ross 



QIQQ 



More active this year than last, the American Industrial Arts Association has 72 members- 
It IS open to all industrial arts majors, with no stipulation upon grades Projects tor this 
year included a "Toys lor Tots" campaign, where the members constructed 700 toy trucks 
lor the Akron area, and hoped lo promote this as a national project. Also, Happy Day 
School was a project, as the members devoted their man hours to construct an addition 
to tt>e building. Projected activities are an annual spring banquet, and a plan to work 
with the Environmental Control Committee to build bicycle racks lor Ihe KSU campus. 







(P) 


C ^'^ 1 J 


15 


^f^f\Mn. 


( 6 \l ( 7 A 
f \ 1 \ . 

\ 1 




^WM 


1. L. OeBaglo, 2. R 


Kontur, 3. B. Smith, 4. R. Brace. 5. K. Rheman, 6. D. Mohan, 


adviser: 7. K. Stress 


, B 


T. Curtis, 9. G. Homes. 10, G Chrlslman, 11. D. Fullerman. 


12. S Layman, advl 


ser 


13. C Fisher, 14, J, Kellner, 15. D, Wiseman, 16, P, Horan, 


17. W. Smith. 16. W 


Sykes. 19. C. Loya. 20 D- Myers. 21. B. Buganski. 22 J. 


Ledgerwood 




alpha ela rhoataa 239 




ongel flight 
ornold oir /odety 

Sponsorw) by Arnold Air Society, Angel Flight members serve as oHIcal hostesses to AAS and Air Force ROTC functions. Besides serving campus 
and community, representatives from KSU's Angel Flight will be sent to stale, regional and national conventions. 



angel flighl-arnold air/240 




1. n. Kollor, 2. M. Engel, 3. T. Byert. 4. J. Dugan. 5. 0. Sharp, 6. P. Shaner, 7. L. Bope, 8. D. Heritage, 9- 
S. Knopp, 10. N. Gauldin, 11. D. Hensel. 12. A. Tabar. 13. C. Lutz, 14. 0. Muller, 15. S. Chirps, 16. D. Moskaley, 
17. W. Stewart. 18. S. Morlarty. 19. K. Jencka, 20. B. Parker, 21. L. Scheumiann. 22. 8. Way 





1. J. Dugan 2. u Sanlchl. 3. p. Shanof. 4. T. Byers 
5. L. Bop«, 6. D. Moskaley. 7 A- Tabat, a. M. Engol 

T.^ir"",'',""k'..^ ^''"^'- '» * Stewart, 11 K. 
Janck.. 12. D. Mullef. 13. B. Parker, 14. D Sharp 



eKec 
board/ 



The development of eHedive Air Force otflcers Is the goal of Arnold 
Air Society, the honorary Air Force ROTC service organization. The 
Military Ball, parties for underprivileged children, service to the Hattle 
Lariam Foundation and sponsoring Angel Flight are their major 

adlvilles. 



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/ 1 ft\ 1 /] 


• 


Ajslkl4^ 


1. W. McCloud. 2. F. Kollonakl, 3. R. Daley, 4. J. Dugan, S. J. 


Konira, 6. T. Aroro, 7. L. Koslba, 8. P. Vee, 9. H. Blind, 10. J. 


Baahore, 11. D. Blcharda, 12. J. Slaka. 13. Dr. P. A. Oneraon 


Advlaer, 14 Dr. W. N. Hubin Adviser, 15. T. Preece, 16 R. BIckls. 


17. S. Turcola, 18. T. Sabal, 19 J. Laurenzand. 20. D. Lowell 



QIQQ 



Brlr>glng together aerospace students and professionals la 
the aim of the American Institute of Aeronautics and As- 
tronautics. Members of the Kent chapter sponsored an Ice 
skating party, (laid trips, and the annual Aerospace Banquet 
to meet that aim. 



exec board-amerjcan institute ot aeronautics and astronautics/ 241 




Q//OC for 
childhood ed 



The Association lor Childhood Education is open lo any student ma)orlng in Special, Elementary or Early Childhood 
Education and Is primarily concerned with children between two and twelve years old. At monthly meetings guest 
speakers relate Ideas and ways of dealing with young children, so that the members learn from speakers as well 
as gaining practical ejtperlence Irom working with children in a service project. 



as50c lof childhood ed /242 



t J. Auskings, 2. S. Sigler, 3. W. Tepper, 4. J. Leinweber. 5. 
E, Nowak, 6. J. Slaley, 7, N. Himler. 6. J. Miller. Pres. 9. N. 
Vastlenko. 10. S. Ball. 11. H. DelPozzo. 12. S Page. 13. K. Clark. 
14. M. Lapp, 15. D. Berg, 16. J. Jones, 17. L, Singhaus. 18. J. 
RIggs, 19. L. Bowers 




_J 





1 J Rogovin. 2 B Bronson, 3 D Olevar, 4 J Frontlns. 5 M 
UcCready 



QUU/ 



Associated Women Sludenls. whose purpose is to promote 
cultural, social, scholastic and traditional activities, seeks to keep 
the women on the Kent campus informed ot important events 
Along with sponsoring Little Sis Weekend. Mom s Weekend and 
Porkbarrel, AWS hosted a new project— a Spring Sndal Fair, 
where fashions from a Cleveland shop, and silver, china and 
glassware displays highlighted the lair 



associated women students 243 




beta 
olpho p/i 



About 60 people, most ot them males, make up Beta Alpha Psi, the accounting 
honorary Members are Initiated during fall and spring banquets Dinner 
meetings at local country clubs enable members to hear speakers who are 
professional accountants. To enter the honorary, accounting majors with a 
three point average apply and are woled upon. The two speakers per quarler, 
letters (rom companies, and visits from professional representatives enable 
Beta Alpha Psi members Io be more aware i i the outside business community. 



beta alpha p3r/244 




li 



1, F. Bush, 2. D. Lewis, 3. D. Rabe, 4. R. Boyer, S. K. Sherwood, 6. D. Conroy. 7, S. Clhahorn, 8. C. Tussel, 
ElllBlon, 10. J. Forney. 11. J. Price, 12. J. Dye, 13. G. Kula, 14. J. Polach, 15. J. Stridden, 16 J. Seeton 




iorclinol key 




1.M. Zink. 2. D. Hitch. 
3 D.Karrer. 4. B.Cal- 
houn. 5 B Goldman, 
6 D Mouyard. 7. K. 
Lamb, B. J. Galena, 9. 
D Saxton. 10. C. 
Kellh,11 K.Schmatz. 
12. L. Copplns. 13. J. 
Milter. 14 P. Lister, 
15 J Hawkins. 16. N. 
Cfossetto, 17. B. 
Bronson. 16. S. Le- 
dyard, 19. B.EIsel,20. 
C- May, 21. Dr. An- 
derson, adviser 



A midnight lapping ceremony of new 
members occurs twice a year and is 
the tradition of Cardinal Key, 
women's honorary recognizing stu- 
dent leadership- In this ceremony old 
members circle the inductee, and as 
they hold candles, sing Ihe Alma 
Maler. As well as hosting a national 
convention al KSU. they will hold an 
Eastern Regional convention this 
year. They also award a yearly schol- 
arship. 




1, L Tolllver, 2. H. Ruffner, 3. C. Ayers, 4. B, Radlgan. 5. P. 
Benoit, 6. J. Gumberl, 7. C -Morgan. 8 J. Castellana. 9 L. Bike, 
10. V Rocine. 11. R. Sterlekar. 12. B. Bernier. 13. J. Stellar, 14. 
J. Angelo. 15. L. Schargorodski, 16. G. Skeldlng. 17. J. Baehr. 
16. M. Galllssio, 19. W. Johnson, 20. D. Nottingham. 21. W. Miller, 
22. J- Warnement, 23. J. Baker, 24. F. Blosser, 25. B. Minnlch, 
26. J Kozlch. 27. V. Petrovlch 



blue 
key 



Leadership and recognition ot students is what Blue Key, 
national men's aclivily honorary, is all about. Each winter 
quarter. Blue Key and Iheir sister honorary. Cardinal Key 
sponsor Ihe Penny Carnival to raise scholarship funds. 

blue key-cardinal key 245 



b'noi 
bVith 
hillel 



Regular Friday nighl servrces are only a small pari o( Hillel. Therr 
largest crowd gathering is a Ion and bagel sale Their College Towers 
apartmenl creates a coffeehouse atmosphere centered around folk 
singing guilar playing and rapping Fund raising includes a corned 
beel dinner held twice a year, but their ultimate goal is to obtain 
a Rabbi and lull time foundation on the KSU campus 




1 S. Edelstein. 2 J Kuller, 3, M, Lustgarlen, 4 D Scolmck, 
president: 5 Dr Gelerintet, adviser: 6 S Friedman, 7 S 

Bloomfreld, 8, R Meisel. 9 L Ross, 10 J Hottman, 11. M, 
Lazarus 



lourel/ 



Laurels, senior women s honorary, has 24 members who were se- 
lected lof their scholarship, leadership, character and service The 
women musi have a 3 01 GPA and recommendations In Laurels 
15 years of eitislence. only 200 have been selected for membership 
The group is trying to get national recognition in Mortarboard Society 
Laurels has been active in helping the sociology depanment in its 
survey of racial prejudice, ushering and hostessing at the Arlisl 
Lecture Series helping the admissions office with visits to high 
schools and building a rapport with alumni 




1 J Forney. 2 K Zadesky. 3 L Coppins, 4 K McBride, 
5 R Bellan. 6 P Lister, 7 J Rogovm, 9 N Crosetto, 9 
N Levis 10 C Lovett. 11 D Orlowe 



bnai brith hillel-laurels ■246 






1 K Halbert, 2 P Hodason, 3 B Smilh, 
4 D. Rack, 5 C. Staph. 6 Spindle, 7 
V Beck, 8 D Moore. 9 K Denton. 10 M 
Steiner, 11 V, Robinson. 12 C. Crum. 13 
C. KIrsopp. 14, N Stoner. 15 T Sacco, 16, 
L Bruning, 17 B Bierman. 18 K Dully, 
19 K Guess. 20 K Wlsniewskl. 21 M 
Stout. 22. S Gasloa, 23. M Hamrah. 24. 
A Herington. 25, L. Duncan. 26 P Sansky, 
27 S Porter. 28, G Gram, 29 T Wallers. 
30, J Hunt, 31 T Marlln, 32 S Kozach, 
33, J flogovin, 34 B, Bemler. 35 B. Sulli- 
van. 36, C, Ayers, 37 R Fuhrer, 38. L 
Dietrich, 39. D White, 40 W Yee. 41, B, 
Kilrpy. 42 K Whitelealher, 43. G Skoch, 
44 K BIckerstatt, 45 B. Coilins. 46 M 
Michalak. 47. T. HInshaw. 48. Edmunds. 
49 S. Harris. 50. C Kramer, 51 S Knopp, 



chestnut league/247 



che/tnut 
league 



Chestnut League, an organization with spirit, puts the pep ol its members behind campus-wide sports activities Us 
members provide the extra support the teams need by making posters and signs, chalking sidewalks, and migrating 
to Miami They sponsor the cheerleaders and riasherelles and Grog, the KSU mascot 



# ^ 



JNr!^ 



■-■■.^^? 



coed 
codette/ 

Ofticial Army ROTC hostesses, the Coed Cadettes serve the campus and community 
by entertaining the elderly at the Portage County Nursing Home, helping al the Kent Junior 
and Senior Science Fair, manning the voting booths for campus elections, ushering a) 
sports events, working in the Clean-up Kent Campaign and assisting the quarterly Red 
Cross blood drive- 



coed cadettes/248 




1. Nt. Skelly. 2. Cpt. T. Kllngef. 3. B Hurd. 4. J. GIrone. 5. D. Delpozzo. 6. D. Voung, 7. C. Bowman. 
8. C. Kubacki, 9. R. A Shumaker. 10. W. Dickinson. 11. R. Whisner. 12. P. Polratz, 13. L. Franktin, 14. 
J. Noble, 15. N. Coan 





1 C RobliKin. 2 n Torch, 3. C Elling, 4 T Rouschllng. adviser; 5, J. DIckBor. 6. B. Havel, president 



collegiate 
morheting 

Students are given (he chance lo meel professional marketing men In the Collegiate 
Marketing Assoclallon. The social aspect of marketing Is stressed through a traditional 
social "Gel Together," where students and professors In the marketing department 
meel. In the planning stages Is a banquet and a simulated marketing world, which 
Is conducted like a game where different colleges would test Ihelr marketing skill 



collegiate marketing/249 





doily 
kent 
/tQter 



-- _ ,^ -^;-^ Four daily deadlines, one darkroom, seven typewriters and 35 people make up the Daily Kent Stater. Printed tour times a week at Gowe 
-^^^g^ii^ printing, approiimately 12 pages a day. An editorial board makes the decisions and nine reporters, tour page lay-out people and advance 

journalism classes supply the manpower Stalters get no course credit (or their pari of the media and average live hours work a day. 

The editors, the news, the stati and plans change every quarter. Only the tabloid size and black ink stay the same. 



/' 



^/M 




1 J. Anderson 2 L Lombardi. 3 M Weston, 4 P Church 5 C Halvey. 6 L Piontkowski. 7 P Engel. 8 B. Hancock. 9 J 
Schmilz, 10 J Kilner, New York Times, Chicago: 11 J Fetters, 12 B Lazarus, tail editor; 13 R Grable. 14. T Lockwood 15 
H Bishop, 16 M Buck 17 L Rotjerts 18 R Cooper. Los Angeles Times, Chicago. 19 D Mclane, 20 L. Tolliver, 21 H Scobie, 
22. E Johnson, 23 D, Trauben. 24 R Volpe. 25. J, Nichols. 26. D Shryock. 27. D. Sapir, 28 J, Gredesky. 29. B. Peabody, 30. 
J, Michener. novelist; 31. D. Arida. 32. S. Zimmerman, winter editor: 33. G. Armstrong McLean, 34 J. Schulte, 35. S. Salyer, 36. 
B Serne 37 I Clutch 




:k 



-^.i 



V 



daily keni stater.25] 



council for 
eKceptionol 

children 



m>\^ 




students who are interested in serving the deat. mentally retarded, handicapped and gitled compose the Council lor 
Exceptional Children, They work on proiects and gain learning experiences from their actlvllles- Projects consist ol baby 
sitting and showing lilms on the teaching methods used (or deaf, retarded and special children. This organization plans 
to hold a Sunday school class lor Ihe retarded and to travel to Apple Creek Inslltule, a mental institution. 



high court 




The combination ol three men lorms Ihe highest judicial body on campus- High court interprets cases connected with 
the student body constitution, student senate and its executive branch and other student organizations. 



council for exceptional children— high court/252 






1, J Lawlor. 2. J. Loaan. 3. G. Nelson, 4. D- Salem. 5. T. Melsler, 
6. D. Schlemmer, 7- M Smith, 8 D Hennigan, 9 C Moore, 10. 
B Noll. 11 C Hosterman 



foren/k/ 



Considered a program since lis beginning In 1928, Forensics centers on intercollegiate competition and debate lis aim is 
lo Held competitive activity and its central core lies In debate, meeting witti sctiools coast to coast, including Harvard and 
Northwestern Universities. Other contests include oratory or memorized speeches, ertemporaneous speaking on selected topics, 
oral Interpretation and reading and experimental speech activities. Non-competitive areas include a Speakers Bureau which 
receives speaker requests Irom the Kent. Akron. Ravenna and Portage County regions, and serving as judges tor area high 
school speech program. Competitive and educational, the KSU Forensics program is not limited to speech majors and anyone 
is welcome lo compete. 



forensic association /253 



Qornrno 
/igmo 
/igmo 



The goal ot Gamma Sigma Sigma, Beta Omega chapter, the women's service sorority 
IS service directed towards the campus m a relevant way The 44 members which include 
a peppy active' pledge class pertormed such service projects as passing out yearbooks 
sponsoring the Ugly Man s contest, helping the aged at Hawthornden State Hospital 
working with both the Akron tutor program and 'Clean Up Kent " Although a chartered 
chapter tor only two years the group hosted an Ohio Valley Regional Conterence the 
weekend ol May 1 which was named by the national chapter as the most productive 
conference Come as you are breakfasts, working tor the McElrath skills project and 
getting to know their (all and spring pledge classes are all a pari o( Gamma Sigma Sigma 
It is open to women ot any race creed or nationality, tor "there is a destiny which makes 
them sisters ' 



L^ 




I L Taylor. 2 K Gighotti. president, 3 M McDermott, 4 K Gedeon. S S. Gute, 
6 A David. 7 R Rosenslock. B N Knopp. 9 C Pegorsch, 10 J Colosetti, 11 
E Penrod, 12 R Brown, 13 J Nicholson, 14 L Patrick, 15 A Wilford, 16 K 
Stephenson, 17 B BischoK. 18 S Page. 19 C Wolfe, 20 N Koch. 21 B DeNal, 
22 L Gladd. 23. T Garnis. 24 D Sweet, 25 L Lyons. 26 M Goslcly. 27 G 
Scebbi 

gamma siqma sigma'?54 





'^ar'Art^ffi?:- 



m. 



>'^ 



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m. 



,\' 






■:sm.^jss 



I 





1 J Jones, 2 D Millner, 3 G Bechl, 4 Siehanies. 5 D Lundgard. 6. D Braff, 7 R Detwller, 8, W, Forrester, 9 
E Baker, president; 10 J. Hindamn. 11 D McKellar, 12 B Muha. 13. B, Maas. 14. J Baehr, 15. H Welker, 16. L. ZInk 



interfroternity 
council 



Intertraterrrlly Council sought to maintain standards ol fralernltles Itirough more work by delegates from the Individual chapters IFC 
representatives worked to make (raterntlles more Independent ol administration guidance. The council's membership dropped as several 
Iralernlly chapters went Inacttve But Sigma Tau Gamma, national rraternlty on the KSU campus which went inactive many years ago, 
had Its charter reinstated 



intertraternity counctl'255 



beta 
beto beta 

National biological organization, B«ta Beta Bats, planned to vIsH the Virginia Institute of Marine Biology spring 
quarter. To raise money lor the trip, members worked a cofteeshop In Cunningham Hall. They also helped with 
the "Clean-up committees" of surrounding towns. Field trips to natural areas were also planned. Each quarter, 
new members are Inducted and during spring quarter they hold a Formal Banquet, 




1. V. Varketta, 2. L Langenbacher, 3. J. Krehblel, 4. Dr. Ruthertord, adviser 5. D. Konopka. 6. K. Malln 
7. R. Fovargue. 8. J. VIdd. 9. D. Wood. 10. J. Amatangelo. president; 11. B. Welmer, 12. G. Hoppert. 13 
G. Schaefer 



cro// country 

Under rookie coach Jim McDonough, the cross-country team had their troubles, losing fn dual matches against 
OU. Miami. Eastern Michigan, and Penn State. The harriers defeated Toledo, but lost to Bowling Green and Western 
Michigan In a quad meet. They placed sixth In a Held of 20 In the All-Ohio meet, and fifth of 6 In the MAC championships. 
The bright spot In the season was when Ed Norrls was named All-Amerlcan. He will compete In the NCAA Cham- 
pionships. 




1. H. Fahl, 2. E. Norrls. captain; 3. R, Hartman, 4. T. Burgner. 5. P. Miles, 6. K. Dawson, 7. S. Borbet, 
J. McDonough, coach 

cross country-beta beta beta/256 




S?*:..S<ig^'?", 









1 Mr Park, 2. J. Pllz. president; 3. E. Gorman. 4. S. Richie. 5. T. Cullen, 6. Mr. KImmel. adviser; 7. B. Ray. 6. J. Brothers, 
9 H. Nykolyshyn, 10- L. Zaie, 11. B. Carlln. 12. J. Walker, 13. B. Malandro, 14. S. Taylor, 15. S. Bailey, 16. J. Bedford, 
17 S, Maahs 



Judo club 



To be a member of Judo Club, one need only show an Interest and attend practices which are held three times a week In the wrestling 
room ot University School. Mr. Kiel-Soon Park who holds the flHh degree black belt In |udo and karate Is present at these practices 
to advise those who know the an, and to teach the beginners throwing and grappling techniques. The more experienced men compete 
In contests of skill. One member who holds a second degree black belt took tirst place last year In the Collegiate National Judo 
Championship In which 42 schools had entered. Competition for women, Kata, which means form, uses a prearranged form to show 
the principles of |udo In a gentle way. Sometimes members get together tor a cookoul or picnic, but mostly meet to learn and practice 
the way ot |udo; effective self-defense. 



judo club/257 







horote 
club 



Alter three years as head ol the Kent State Karate Club, 
the club's lounder and Sense! {chief instructor), Jeung 
H. Kim. is leaving. Under Kim s direction the club has 
grown from 15 members to Ms present number ol 64, 
four of the lormer students having become instructors 
on their own Since lis Inception, the club has competed 
in numerous tournaments winning a total of 23 llrsl- 
places. 42 second-places and 21 third-place trophies 



karate club/258 




10 K 



1 C. Swinhean, 2 T. Shrenk. 3, P, Parsons. 4 L. Searles, 5 R Tirlea, 6 K Jensen, 7 R, Henry. 6. P Wiley, 9 P Source, 
Foreman, 11. M Scene. 12 J Cresculllo. 13 W Welling. 14 M Ullman. 15 T Edwards. 16 B Gfider, 17 B Curtis, 18 B Rome* 
19 B- Maurm. 20. B Beck. 21. J Kreslge. 22. J, Hubbs. 23 M. Borwell, 24. J Kim. 25 V Laquldari. 26 J. Deegan. 27 B. Slosshe^ 
28. P. Sweeny, 29, T, JankowskI, 30. J Serynk, 31. D Verbeck, 32 B. Remain. 33 C Maydak, 34 B Gowens, 35, S Franci 
D, Shapiro. 37. E. Smith, 38 G Montgomery. 39. R. Mohr, 40 R Barker 



36 



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1- J. Chahuan. 2- R 
Temufu, president; 3 
M, Temu, 4 I Fada- 
hunsl, 5 A Shebl, 6. 
n. Kilkenny, 7 J 
Ewing, 8 S Ogun- 
bona,9 S Azalml, 10. 
G. Gowasack, 11 R. 
Myers, 12 M. Azalml. 
13 B Raines, 14 S, 
Obra. 15 M, Anthony, 
adviser, 16. Mrs S. 
Azalml, 17, P, 

Oslegbu. 18. Mrs S. 
Ardtiy. 19. S Ardhy, 
20. M Azalml, 21 P 
Ugochukwu, 22 M 
Mamujee, 23 B Dar- 
poh, 24. S. Megash, 
25 D Johng, 26. J. 
Egekeze 



internotionol/ 

Kent Internationals was founded In 1958 and Its purpose is to ' promote cultural understanding between foreign students 
and Americans In Kent and elsewtiere " Ttiey sponsor a number of activities sucti as ttie International Festival, wtirch Is field 
annually in the union and features displays from various countries, an Embassy Ball, an International Stiowlime and panel 
discussions. Ttiis year they traveled to other Ohio towns and Niagara Falls- The organization is open lo anyone who is Interested. 



keni internationals' 259 




kent interhail councll/260 



hent inter- 
holl council 



EMorls by KIC lo make dorm llle more livable mel with varied success during Ihe year. KIC began action 
on Issues like retrtgeralors In rooms, exlended room visitation, co-ed living, and allowing alcohol In rooms, 
with the only reslrlcllon being slate law (Ihe age limits on 3,2 beer and "high") The group also came 
under lire lor some ol Its programs and actions— In particular, attacks were leveled at the purpose ot 
some eNpendllures and Ihe manner ol dlslrlbutlng scholarships lo dorm residents. At limes there were 
even arguments wllhin Ihe group as lo tts purpose— some said II was a service organization, while others 
claimed It should play a political role In the unlverstly. 



- 



1, P Benalt, 2, J, Pastis, 3. J. McAulhur, 
Rundell, 5 K- Hetzer, 6, S, Gallager, 7, 
B Metzler,9, J Kohn, 10 S, Ledyard, IIP ^''^''' 
12 T, Shaker. 13. M, Laskoudo, 14 5 MaCf^ 
T Slater, 16 Rosetjough, 17. T Golden ^ 
Mayer, 19 J Grame. 20 fl Malik, 21 
22 S Duncanson 23, J, Auld, 24 B DaU 
Foley, 26 H WenslenI, 27 F Ward. 28 
domski, 29 D Dowd, 30 B Swallleld 







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SchargorodskI, 9 J 
Henry. 10 P Slevens, 
11 E Shuman, 12 T 
Shaker, 13 J Cor- 
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man, 15 B. Badlgan, 
t presldeni, 16 J 
McAuthur 



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koppo 
pN 



As a religious service organization lor the community, Kappa Phi meets weekly at Wesley 
Foundation For Kent wellare children. Kappa Phi sponsored a Halloween parly and 
Thanksgiving project During the Christmas season members caroled at Robinson- 
Memorial Hospital, and lor spring a marathon walk to earn money lor McElrath Park, 
In spring Kappa Phi holds their annual formal with their brother fraternity In June members 
plan to attend the National Convention held In Colorado 



kappa phi/ 262 



1. V. Schmauch, 2. M. Skrletts. 3. 
A. Biemel, president^ 4. C. Moir, 5. 
P McCroble, 6. M. Ulmer, 7 C- 
Reinwald, 8 D DIHord, 9 G. GIbbs, 
10. P. McFerren, 11. Mrs. G. Brown, 
adviser; 12. D. Lyons. 13. K. Minar- 
clk, 14. E. Dobos, 15. C Joseph, 
16. N- Jurlg. 17. K. Porrer. 18. J. 
Miller, 19. S. Conley, 20. 1^. O'Neill. 
21 J. Graham, 22, C Pearson, 23. 
M Miller. 24. C. Hisher, 25. S. 
Grubbs. 26. S Kent, 27. M Miller, 
28. R. Hedeen, 29 B. Bartko, 30. 
K. MIklovic, 31. Mrs. D. Shilling 






1 T OHara, 2 J Cornes, 3 E Penrod, 4 D Penrod, 5 J Cok, 6. B. FItlapalldo, 7, B. Perko 



mojor event/ 



The Maior Events Committee, reorganized this year, is now more functional. Permanent members are assigned to particular committees 
lor the entire year, which allows each member to elllcienlly plan the "big" events on campus, such as Winter Weekend, Campus Day. 
Homecoming and all the ma)or concerts and special activities al Kent. 



major events/263 





*^' 



name or organization MOBOBRIOUS PIT president Nude Runner where he may be reached Room 13 Stopher Hall 
advisor Chuck Sackett housemother Mrs, RobI, White treasurer Albino Watermelon organization address 210 Olson 
Hall check type or organization Other is the organization local or national? Internalionai when and where do you 
hold your business meetings? Venice Cafe when was your organization founded on campus? 1837 what is the specific 
purpose of your organization? To instigate, dominate, propagate, relegate, masturbate, inebreate. Initiate, castigate, 
moderate. Investigate, regulate, situate, and prosllate campus activities what service and social activities did you sponsor 
last spring'> T P Waterhouse for President. Angela Lllrico for Campus Day Queen, Sklnny-dlpping Party, The Mummy, 
and The Bowman Incident what achievements and awards have you won since spring? Joe Kuchta award for Outstanding 
Service to The Police Force. The J.T S Brown Scholastic Award tor the Lowest Group Acum., The Benid|l Slate College 
Invitational Turtle Hunt (RRST PLACE). Lenny Bruce Forensic Award what other traditions do you have? Spirit Log. 
Mung. Spring Love-in, Bearded Clam, Pipe Alley Girl of the Week, Parties. Drinking and Getting Sick anything unusual 
about your pledge periods (anything humorous) Once every 28 days and It ain't tunny when 11 ain't usually If you 
have your own residence, when did you acquire It? anything unusual or humorous about It? how many members 
live there'' Acquired this tail, lire hydrant, lamppost, autographed picture of Annette Funicello, between 3 and 371 
what In particular sets your organization apart Irom others of Its kind? YOU HAVE GOT TO BE KIDDING ME!l! any 
big plans (or the future? A zeppeline race, elephant hunt, gerbli plague is there any other pertainent, Interesting and 
humorous Infofmalion' Pimp, pimp, pimp, pimp, we ain't stuck up we ain'l shit, let's hear a cheer for the Mobobrlous 
Pit with an MamaOanaBananOanaB-R-l-O-U-S Pit, Benito, Benito, Benllo Mussolini, da-da-da-da -da-da-da -da PIT!!! 



mobobrious pit/264 




1. "Snake" Sterlekar. 2, 'Midas" Moll. 3. "Nude Runner" Pelrlch, 
4. "Big Wayne" KIpp, 5. "Weeper" Byers, 6. "Chunk" Tipton, 
7. "Raf Rechedy, 8. "Deviant German Albino Watermelon Troll" 
Warnoment, 9. "Chuckle" Sackett, 10. "Crip" Burt, )). "Crazy 
Al" Spoerr, 12. 'Che" Sleltens. 13. "Wags" wagner, 14. "Gio- 
vanni" Mayher 





1. R. Pierce, 2. L, rankltn, 3. T. SIgler, 4. C. May. 5. 
J. Beahr. 6. B. MInnich, 7. 0. Karrer, 8. B. Bowdon 



neuu /tu 
dent pro 
grom 

The Eudaemonlcal Gallimaufry or "a jumbled assortment 
conducive to happiness" Is the New Student Program. But 
this year, change produced personalization of the traditional 
with added events: a planetarium show, a cinematography 
show, a pantomime, and discussions on tha Kegley Commis- 
sion, women's liberation, ecology, and blacks and minorities. 

mu 

ioto 
/igmo 



Special care and training of deaf children while bringing 
members together are goals of Mu lota Sigma, the national 
education honorary, individual tutoring helps deaf children to 
understand the world around them and offers students an 
opportunity to gain eiperlence In their field. The members 
again sponsored Ihelr annual Christmas party for deaf children. 
New members were Inducted In a candlelight ceremony. 




1. K. Milne. 2. M. Robin. 3. K. Mazarlk. 4. S. Carlson, 
president 




neujmon 
center 

KSU's Newman Center is a ministry ot priests and laymen representing 
the presence of the Catholic church on the Kent campus Learning about 
the contemporary community and applying such knowledge to its own 
programs enables Newman Center to oiler a counseling service. Research 
and study include all aspects o( life which relate to the moral and spiritual 
concerns ol the college student Its hallmark is Its availability to students 
at all hours, and \n every aspect ol a students' lile Newman is a service 
edorl to study, counsel and communicate with students in an atmosphere 
receptive to Inlluencing development and growth 



newman center/266 



1, Father Jim O'Brien 

2. A. Marquard. 3 Fa' 
ther Fred Trucksls. 4 
T. Lownik, 5. K. Sull 
van 






orcler 
of omego 

The Order of Omega Is a national honorary lor outstanding fraternity men. They're selected on the basis of scholarship, 
office held and service. Nominations and Initiations are held during fall quarter. 




1- J. Taylor. 2. J. Rodkey. 3. 0. Mancino, 4. S. Lubtsch, pres. 5. A. Art7ner. 6. H. Turner. 7. J. HIndman. 
6. R. Barr. 9. T. Fisher, 10. H. Huck. 11. J. Revezzo. 12. B. Maas, 13. M. Braff 



omicron 
delta koppo 

The qualifications for membership In OmIcron Delia Kappa are service to the campus, scholarship, outstanding character, 
democractic Ideals, and leadership In areas such as student government, residence halls, varsity athletics, student 
publlcaltons, and military and fraternal orders. The 39 members, students, faculty, alumni and campus leaders, partici- 
pated this year In the ODK Leadership Banquet and the Campus Day Alumni Breakfast. 




1. J. Stellar, 2. R. Kelley. 4. L. Hellman, pres., 5. J. Begala, 6. J. Baker. 7. R. Harley, 6. J. Romeo, 9. R. 
Grimmett, 10. C. PaHerson, 11. R. Be«r, 12. J. Parks, 13. D. Ambler, 14. R. Roskens 



omicron delta kappa— order of omega/267 




ponhel council 



This year. Panhel Council Is co-sponsoring Sigma Chi Derby Day, Pork Barrel, May Day Relays. Homecoming and Campus 
Day elections and activities with IFC. The 27 members ol Panhel bring together the sororities lo promote greater interaction 
between the Greeks and the campus. 



I. D. Mermer. 2. L Franklin. 3. M, 
Hedges. 4. K. Rielly, 5. P. BDIich. 
6. S. Krisch, 7, D. Hitch. 8. T. 
Kutller. 9- P. Lister. 10- A. Miller. ^ 

II, L. Norcia, 12. D. Sarollo. 13, / 
M. Klass. 14. N. RIngle, 15. T. / 
Pederson. 16, S, Mees. 17. W. I 
Stilwell J 


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phi qI- 
pho theto 



Phi Alpha Thela, an international history honorary, consists o( both undergraduate 
and graduate students. Two Initiation banquets are held yearly, in addition to monthly 
meetings featuring guest speakers who discuss historical topics. Members also lake 
part in panel discussions; one oT the topics dealt with the obligations of the professional 
historian. Each year members ol Phi Alpha Theta attend both regional and state 
meetings of the chapter 



panhel-phr alpha thela/268 




--^ - 



^ ^-^-A.: .. .1 •■ I ■ ■ 





n Hodon. 2, Cpt, J, Cretella, adviser; 3 P, Poliatz, 4. R. Shumaker, 5. A. CKanl, 6. J. 
larbel. 7 J. Nelson. 8 K, Moyers. 9 J Hlllsman. 10. J Kapllan, 11. D. Brumm, 12. D. Gowens 
13. G. Williams, 14 J Meleney, 15 T Vasallo. 16 J 
'9. R. Crane. 20 E Velez. 21 M 



Lenart, 17. D. Wright, 18. C. Duncan, 
Krelcl. 22 H Hueslon 



per/hing rifle/ 

Performing service to Ihe universily and (he clly Is Ihe primary purpose of Pershing Rifles. Projecls included 
sponsoring a Ballalion Drill Meel, the 1971 Military Ball and a field training exercise. The group made plans to 
attend Ihe Cherry Blossom festival in Washington. D.C. Seven members live in Iheir house on Craln Street which 
was built In Ihe 1630's. Nationally the largest military Iraternily in the world, KSU's chapter holds parties for local 
orphans, and sponsors a child overseas. 



pershing rifles/269 



/oiling 



Sailing Club, "one ot the most traveled clubs on campus," Journeys lo Ohio Slate, Cincinnati, Purdue, 
and Navy, adding to the total ol five meets each fall and spring. This year the group acquired the 
use o( Sliver Lake for home meets. Three Flying Juniors and a Rascal are the crafts used for competition 
and training ol new members. Such training includes classroom training which is provided for an 
hour before the weekly meetings. Novices also gain sailing experience whenever they can get them- 
selves and a skipper together at Silver Lake. Between 60 and 70 people travel to meets, with 10 
on the racing team and the remainder comprising the "party team." 




1, B. Smith. 2. K. McLaughlin, 3. K. Greene. 4. C. Mason. 5. K. Pinkls. 6. S. HIsalltl, 7. W. 
Phillips, 8. C. Scott, 9. C. Kaufholz, 10. G. Stverlsen, 11. C. Brown. 12. J. Vahldteck. 13. 
T. Doyle, 14. C. Simmons. 15. P, Turner. 16. B. Hyslop. 17. C. Templer, 18. J. Marr, 19. B. 
Erickson, 20. M. Biuestein. 21. M. Alderman, 22. J. Larosa. 23. S. Coy 



plii Qom- 
mo nu 



Organized on campus In 1951. Phi Gamma Nu. Hho chapter, recognizes scholarly women In the field 
ol business- Besides hearing ttto guest speakers each year, and contributing regularly to their pro|ect 
of supporting a foster child In Korea, they earn money by selling candy and working at various office 
jobs- Traditionally, they look forward to their Founders Day banquet In February, and an annua) spring 
picnic. All members must have a 300 accumulative average in business and pass a written exam. 
This organization has been in the top ten in scholarship among women's business honoraries for 
the past 14 years. 




I. GrIHIth. 2. M. 
Smith, 3. J. Dunning, 

4. C. Duffy, 5. E. 
Emerlck, 6. M. 
Thomas. 7. N. Long, 
8. E. Llchlenberg. 9. 

5. Decker, 10. C. Ell- 
Ing. 11, D. McCarver, 
president 




NO SMOW^G 



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1 C Kotuta. 2 K Wong, 3 B. Hill, 4 U KotowskI, 5 A. WalBon, pres. 6. S. West, 7. W. Papay, 9. L. Morohead, 9. K. Cummlna, sponsor. 
10 K Fox, 11 B Slgrlsl, 12. E Manlsch, 13 S. Molllco. 14, D, Rolhsleln. 15. C. Gladd, 16. M. Battlsta, 17. J. Reho, 18. S. Magyer, 
19 A Tllford, 20 B Mallet, 21 D. Marquart, 22 H Johnson. 23, M Miller. 24. F. Hartls. 25. T. Smith 



phimu 
ep/ilon 

Memberahlp in Phi Mu Epsllon consists ol selected students 
who are proficient In mathematics. New members joined the 
organization at an annual Initiation dinner, and later got 
acquainted with mathematics faculty and student majors at 



w 



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pl mu epslion/271 




/hark/ 



Often described as a troupe of dancers using water as 
their stage Is the Sharks Synchronized Swim Club, 
organized at KSU In 1949. Last year the Iheme of their 
annual spring show was "Sign of the Times" and was 
highlighted by the whole group doing a number called 
the "Age ol Aquarius". When llrst Inducled, a member 
Is a "Guppy," but the perfection ol aquatic stunts wins 
him the lllle of "Shark." Each year the Sharks look 
forward to the Intercollegiate Synchronized Swim f^eet 
when clubs throughout the fUlldwest are Invited to par- 
ticipate. 



1. C. Marvin, 2. R. 
Green, 3. B. Debula, 
4.C.FIsco.5.C.Kelly, 
6. E, Nowak, 7. J. 
Wade, a. C. Gribby. 9. 
J. Harrington, 10. K. 
Dunn. 11. B. Mengel, 
12. K. Gedeon. 13. G. 
Wasshanun, 14. L. 
Janecek, 15. D. 
Catchpole. 16. J. 
Jenecek, 17. J. Wle- 
senann, 18. J. Toye, 
19, O. Dahms, 20. H. 
ZItek. 21. M.Ross, 22. 
G. Thiersch, 23. C. 
Koncal,24.B.Grlndle. 
president 





flnMM 




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2. K 


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/ mauch, 4. C. Kemper, | 


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<-^ ten8, 7. S. Swa 


nson. 




k^____„^,-^ 8. P. Morablto. 


9. J, 




Pollarlne, 10. K 


Paul, 




11, K. Vaughn. 


12, L. 




Noyes, 13. T. 


West, 


l- — 


president 





/igmo 
olpho eto 

Sigma Alpha Eta, a service organization In the community. Is the national speech 
pathology and audlology honorary at KSU. Meetings are held monthly with various 
other workshops sponsored by the members throughout the year. This year Sigma 
Alpha Eta members volunteered to tutor mentally retarded children at The Hattle 
Larlham Foundation. They hope to otter their tutoring services to the whole 
community In the future. Other projects sponsored were their annual Christmas 
party, working with the Easter Seal committee and their Spring Initiation Banquet. 



Sigma alpha eta/273 



/igmo 
clelto chi 



Sigma Delia Chi, professional |ournallsm society, raises standards ol competence, recognizes 
achievement and recruits talent. Membership is open to any journalism major. Because aPI 
but tour members graduated last year, a tall Initiation was held In addition to the annual 
spring one. Representatives were sent to the national convention held in Chicago in October. 
For Christmas, the organization bought and distributed food baskets to needy families. Another 
group project involves traveling to branch campuses and helping out with their student 
publications. 




1. C. Mueller. 2. E. Satranlck, 3. T. Knowles. 4. B. Lazarus, 5. G. Williams, 6. S. 
Miller, 7. J. Ntehols. B. J. Schulte, 9. R. McNees, 10. L. Rose, 11. B. Post, 12. J. 
Schmitz 




/•p«o.t. 



Student Project of Today works to increase international understanding through parllclpallon. 
Last summer a few students attended a work camp in Europe. Volunteers pay for their own 
travel to and from the camp, while food, lodging and Insurance are provided at the camp. 
Students do various types of manual labor or social work. S.P.O.T. memtwrs are working 
to become accredited with the Experimental College. During the year they sponsor several 
fund raising projects. 




1 C Miller, 2 P Matone. 3 S Ryedak, 4. Dr. J. Biedler. 5. D. Barrere, 6. L, Dlggs 
7 B Koehler 



Sigma ima ch(-3pot/274 





/koting club 



Recreation Is the primary goal of Skating Club. In their first year on campus, the club Is developing 
their Instructional program; now the advanced members teach the tieglnners. Closely associated with 
Phi Kappa Theta, the two groups co-host parties and beer blasts. The 7S meml>ers hope to double 
their count In the future. Their biggest activity this year was the presentation of "Ice Fantasy '71," 
which Included group acts, competition relays and Ice follies. Professional Cheryl Gossetln. who has 



skated In the "Ice Follies," co-ordinated the event. 



skating club/275 




Ski Club, a non-competltlve social organization, has the largest membership of all groups on campus. The 300 members vary 
in skills trom the novice to certified ski Instructors The club arranges tor weekly trips lo a local ski area where members lake 
lessons, ski and visit In the lodge which provides a band tor entertainment. Membership In the ski club entitles members to 
a slight discount on equipment Other activities sponsored by the group Include weekend trips lo New York and Pennsylvania; 
a week long trip to Aspen, Colorado, over spring break; a ski show lor the benellt ot the Olympic Ski fund, and occasional skating 
parlies Spring quarter the Ski Club goes on a canoe trip. 
ski club/276 





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1 G. Skeldtng, 2 B Brumbaugh, 3. T. Lewandowski. 4. J. Baehr. Pfes. 5, B. Johnston, 6. K. Meyer, 7, 
' Utter, e L Malandro, 9. P. Treckel, 10. J. Schuster, 11 S. Greco, 12. C. Kubackl, 13. J. Lombardo, 
'4 D Townsend, 15. N Wuclnick, 16 L Haas, 17. J. Hren, 18. C. Paparone, 19. B. Scarborough. 20. 
J- Reno. 21 P Shaner, 22 S Dommel, 23. S. Copecci, 24. J. Schneider, 25. J Talclel, 26. M. Neld, 
" J ScaparottI, 28. K. BIckerstall, 29. J. Farr, 30. A. Simmons, 31 Nj Betegh, 32 D. Young, 33. K. 
Thomas 34 S Rapaporl, 35, H. Pierce, 36. K, Newell, 37. L. Vuska, 38. G. Fisher, 39. G. TadeJ 




: ^iiia * '' 



/tuclent Qctlvltle/ 
board 



Supported by student fees. SAB provides a wide range of student activities: Weekend Flick, Spring Fling, SAB Film Classic, lolk (esllvals. and Creallve 
Arts Festival. 



student activities board/277 



/tudent educ - 
otionol Q/zodotion 

Teaching Is the future goal of members of the Student Education Association. To help Ihemselves toward that goal, this year memtrars sponsored 
a Future Teacher's Day for area high schools, and discussed teaching techniques with other chapters' members during a regional conference. 
Officers of the group attended Camp Musklngham, a leadership conference. Delegates from Kent's Chapter helped to write a new Constitution 
for the national organization. 



student education assoc /278 



I 





1. C. Przybyla. 2. B. Bronson, 3. M. Sahrlnger 




??l^v 




ii:-:»J 




/tudent /enote 



Student Senate through various programs pushed tor more control of Student Activities money to gain more power lor students. Through 
the Senate Emergency Fund, they tunded worthwhile programs such as Black History Month and the hockey club. The Senators approved 
and set up the Legal Aid Clinic on a part time basis to provide pre-trial advice to students. Student Senators were unsure about 
the results of their efforts to provide Increased communication with the administration. Problems hampered efforts of the Senate, 
and towards the end of the year, they supported the attempt to write a new Constitution for Student Government. 





1. R. Gehlbach, 2. B. Umb. 3. B. Fox, 4. J. Liber, 5. B. Metzler, 6. G. Hawes, 7. K. Jackson. 8. P. MlllhoH, 9. K. Gordon, 
10. J. Bahr, 11. M. Zeldner, 12. D. Clark. 13. E. Dunlevy, 14. E. Kramer, 15. T. DIckerson, president; 16. T. Shilling, 17. D. 
Allerkruse, 18. B. Bernler, 19. W. Yee 



A 


/< 


IQ 


R 


f* 


\S 




iA 


f 


^ 




\ 


K 


\ 1. R. Peabody. 2. C. 
\ Morgan, 3. 8. Gage, 4. 

Y D.CIark,S.S.GIHIIIen. 

) 6. J. Buchanan, 7. T. 

/ DIckerson. 8. W. Slo- 
/ cum, 9. C. Bavender, 
' 10. J. Nuber 

^ student senate/279 



phi 

ep/ilon 

hoppQ 

Phi Epsllon Kappa, an honorary service organization, works lo promote 
advanced study of health, physical education and recreation at KSU- 
Meetlngs are held twice a month where members discuss various projects 
(or the year This year members sponsored a basketball game (or a boys 
club and donated Christmas toys to needy families. They also help at 
sporting events throughout the year as ushers. In the spring Phi Epsllon 
Kappa members hold a banquet with an outstanding sports figure as 
guest speaker. 



f^)^^^)JlFfp}C^ 


(iTTV^^h^ 


y\Sr>'^\^^ ri 


/^^^ 


1, T. Sharp. 2, S. Hamada. 3. D, Hover. 4 


B. Munson. president. 


5. P. Nabil. 6- IMl. Patterson. 7. M. Paget. 8. 


J. Begaia, 9. 0. Paskert. 


10. T. Burlck. 11. N. DIgrino, 12- P. Telchert, 13. R, Koslsky. | 


14. D. Rango. 15. K. Morganstern. 16. 


D. Locy. 17. R. Kamp, 


18. A. Welner, 19- T. Phillips. 20. T. Malletl 


. 21. R, Bachna. adviser 



veteran/ 

Q//OC 

The goal of Veterans Association Is "to aid the veteran as he procures 
an academic goal." In the past, this organization bused disabled veterans 
from Cleveland hospitals and took them to a Flashes basketball game. 
With female helpers, the hospital veterans attend sporting and social 
events, and are given tours ol the campus. This activity of helping other 
veterans Is planned to continue, because, in the words of one of the 
club members. "Everyone d'gs the heli out of It." 




1 J. PIfer. 2. R. Stelskai. 3. A. Vankirk, president; 4. B. Andrz- 
haewski. 5. D. Berg. 6. R, Arbaugh, 7, D, Dzladosz. 8, T- Renner 



phi epsilon kappa-veterans assoc /280 






1 B Marrone 2 K Greene 3, J Robb 4, J Ambrose 5 W Eames 6. D. Thorn 7, J, Hickson 
8 B Cowell 9 C Long 10 N Weisthal 11. J Roche 12. J Fitzgerald 13. L, Beale 14 B, McCoy 
15 J, Oannley 16 D DImanna 17 K Ward 18 C Stylinski 19. V Amster 20 K. Shaub 21. D 
WoKson 22 B CIrcosIa 23 A Stokes 24 T Liberlore 25 R. Flellz 26, M, Wilt 27, R. Candea 
28. J. Taylor 29 G Bennedetll 



uuh/u 



So, you want to work at WKSU? Let me show you around the 
radio station . . "Bob Marrone plays hit MUSIC!" . . This Is 
AM Control 2, with 2 cart machines, 2 turntables, 2 tape decks, 
constant chatter and spit on the microphone . . . This is Studio 
C, used tor AM news, production and training sessions . . This 
Is Continuity, the center for organization. Ideas and confusion 
. . . Where's the announcer? "WKSU-FM presents an interlude 
of recorded music" . . . and downstairs, Is TV-2, and The Wee- 
kender . . . "Fade to black, up on 5, sound, light the slide, open 
the announce booth. Read It" . . . Studio A, Master Control and 
the Control Room . . 'Ready 1, open his mike, cue him and 
take 1" . . , Learning, teaching and serving , . . "This Is WKSU, 
Kent." 



wksu tv and radio/281 






," t 



K 



fr 




uuomen/ rec- 
reotion q//oc. 

GiMs rn the WRA are not "Janle Jocks." Members wani to further athletics and sports at the highest level 
and still have lun. WHA opens the gyms and swimming pools on campus to all coeds with Its Intramural 
programs and open gym sessions, with competition organized on an Inter-dofm and inler-organlzatlon basis. 



women's recreatron a830C,/282 




1. L. Bright, 2. S. Stoufler, 3. 0. Yakim, 4. N. Parker. 5. L. Hanklns, 6. J. Rosenberg, pres. 7. S. Swanson. 
8. L. Gardner, 9. K. Faber, 10 K. Stephensom, 11. P. Moore, 12. J. Larosa, 13. C. Frazler, 14. C. Miller, 
15. L. Chamowilz, 16. S. Lloyd 



olpho 
gommo delto 

'lough, and 1*11 lough lulth you: 



1. L. Coe. 2. B. Kelley. 3. B. Luce, 4. J. 
Schuler, 5. P. Mayo, 6. M. Scattefday, 7. 
P. Blellch, 8. C. Hazard, 9. C. Rda, 10. L. 
Peelz, 11. D. Landy, 12. C. AlsteadI, 13. B. 
Chrysler, 14. S. Terhune, 15. J. Lldon, 16. 
E. Barnea, 17. N. Werner, 18. K. Kegg, 19. 
B. Illalon, 20. E. McKenna, 21. B. McGrath, 
22. D. Leis, 23. K. Dungan, 24. K. Pell, 25. 
L. Lester, 26. E. Ta|kowskl, 27. V. Hothem, 
28. C. Martin, 29. M. Leesburg, 30. P. 
McGee, 31. S. Perrlne, 32. M. Bolenbaugh, 
33. C. Elliot, 34. C. Helnlsch 




cry. ond Til cry too. for ujhotever come/ to q//qII you 1/ there to q//qII me*' 



alpha gamma delta/263 



olpho 

Chi 
omoQQ 



together s^ 

letu/ 
/eek the 
height/ 





1, J Knoch 2 C ZigmunI 3. J- Bond 4, S. Rulle 5. K. Milne 6. S. Brown 
7 N. Levis 8 L. Macaulay 18, B. BoguskI 19- N. Burghardt 20. L, Klolz 21. 
S, Swanson 22 J Reed 23, N, fiingle 24, D. Hensel 25. K. Ellashel 31. J. 
Culberlson 32, D. Perclch 33. K. KadowakI 34. L, Wedler 35. C, Deslelano 
36. J. JeHery 

alpha chi omega/284 



/ 




-.>*. 



■A-Vj'- 




9, L. Noyes 10- S, Sell 11. L. Forcella 12. F. Ferranle 3. J. Glammarla 
14. J. Roeslnger 15. S. Kotefba l6. J. MuraskI 17. N. Kadlowec 26. K. 
Berg 27. S. JImeson 28. D. Slevenson 29. J. Tressler 30- B. Laurenzl 
37. L. Haas 38. M, Mazur 39. K. Jackson 40. J. Zavacky 41, L. Simons 
42. K. Schneider 

alpha chi omega 285 



olpho 
phi 



•• 



founded 

upono 

rock " 



alpha phi/286 






19. J. Johnson, 20. A. Bleshman, 21. J. McMannis, 22. S. Dommell. 23. S. Rapaport, 24. F. Hodnett. 25. 
J. Hawkrns, 26. A. Wtnton, 27. L Afexander, 28. P. Lombardo, 29. B. Holland, 30. C Keith. 31. K. Meyer, 
32. F. Foradas. 



(^ 




^. C. Carey, 2. U. Reddick, 3. T. Hick. 4. D. Roepke, 5. S. Sells. 6. P. Edgecombe. 7. P. Music. 8. P. 
Meuller. 9. J. Froehlick, 10. J. Lint. 11. N. Sassaman. 12. C. Perkowskl. 13. C. Menge. 14. J. Wilson, 
15. M. Kile. 16. J. Jorgenson, 17. J. DeBlaslo. 18. C. Woods, president. 



t 



alpha phi, 287 






11 





^r^ 



a_y 



y 



JK«& \ 



W^.^} 




m 




alpha xi della/2a8 










^ 



^*^ 



•■r:^:^ 



r ^ 



V 



\V-V:^2^ 1 




Z^^l fl^L f 


^M^^H^^^B 


y 


^^■d^^Hr'' ) 


f [^^ 


^ 


1 1 i 






wmm m 




ii 


i^.: jte|^^ 


p .J ^ 


t- •-*'• -, _ / "^SW"- -v^' . 


!WS;^SJJT?^S31Sffl 














olpho 
Ki delta 



though VOU cQrft give 

thou/and/, be one of 

the thou/ond/ uho 
GIV6" 




1, B, Church 2. H. Garvey 3. C. Wooten 4. C, Hirschberg 5. D. Schwende 6. J. Dapper 7. B. Lambert 8. 
L. Richardson 9. J. Paul 10. J. Jerrtrles 11. B. Johnson 12. D. Sraocco 13. L. Szaraz 14. K. Murphy 15, 
J- Floro 16. K. Krand 17. K. Fine 18. B. Miracle 19. K. Vaughn 20. A. Thompson 21. P. Lilley 22. J, Shannon 
23. C. Paslls 24. J. Gtrone 25. C. Ord 26. P. Weber 27. C. Tulty 28, M, McGlvney 29 D, Knight 30 P. 
Wolfe 31. B. Sluko 32. 8. Williams 33. P. Justen 34. G. Harris 35. S. Rolblal 36. M. Hoffman 37. M. Zak 



alpha Ni delta 289 




• * 



olpho koppo 

olpho 

by merit, oncl by culture** 



alpha kappa alpha/290 







^ 


-N 










- ..^Q.^ 




{I 


5 

9 


y 19 


y 


F 


r 


L 


tMy^ 


i 7 I 




\ 


2 


V 


^ 


"^ 


s 




S Y\ ^ ni 


\ 4 I 


\ 


\ 


\ 


^ 


1 




L 


i 


\(X LI 


1. D. Robinson, 2. S. Robinson, 
T. Massey. 10. S. Fields, 11. B. 
S. Evans, 18. K. Travan, 19. C. 


/ 

3. M. Slover, 
Prince, 12. C 
Wilson, 20. D. 


4. J. Robinson, 5. D. Payne, 6. J, Hill, 7. L. Wade. 8. D. Jackson, 9 
Hicks, 13. M. Turnbull, 14. M. While, 15. H. Smith, 16. B. West, 17 
Morton, 21. E. McMlchaol, 22. L. Jordan, 23. C. Smith, 24. D. Hearn 


25. L. Collier, 26. Mrs 


E 


Ritchie 


advisor 









..-"'l 






Hfi^xr- 



m^MLr,_. 




Uv^ 



*. 





i?M£^<a^^ 



' '^ Hill, 2. D. Chapman, 3. C. Ross, 4. W. McDonald, 5. G. Thorton, 6. M. Trimble, 7. B. Robinson, 8. S. Smith, 9. A. Scott, 
'J S Mftchal. president; 11. C. Hampton, 12. S. Wood, 13. L. Williams, 14. L. Murphy, 15. L. Carter, 16. P. Burton, 17. L. 
^<'btjm, 18. J. Woolfolk, 19. L. Franklin, 20. O. Williams, 21. R. Dobbins, 22. B. Rucher, 23. D. McDanlel. 24. M. Leonard. 
'-" G Perry, 26 E. Simmons, 27. D. McElryo. 2B. C. Smith, 29. S. Slallworlh, 30. S. Holllnger, 31. A. Kilkenny, 32. S. Herd, 
^3 A Bowe, 34. M. Jewetl, 35. R. Price, 36. V. Bernal, 37. J. Cochran, 38. C. Lofton 



delta /igmo 
theto 

"To be young, gifted. 

BLPCK. ond o D€LTR. 
...thotVujhefeltVQtr' 



delta Sigma theta/291 



^^w 



^ 'Vr- 



mi 




\:^^' 




fy^' 



-^A< 



\y^' 






/ r 



m 



i^-i.y"!r 



-•^. 



Chi omega/292 



, '. ■l'? 







Chi 
ofineQQ 

"hellenic culture 
through chri/tion 
ideal/" 




1. J. Comes 2. C. Sedgley 3. K. Poten 4. L. Tompkins 5. J. Mraz 6. G. Richards 7. J. Bowling 8. D. Swieciciti 
9. P. Lisler 10. C. Carr 11, M. Loch 12, D. Eiiis 13. J. ScaparoUi 14. S. Ledyard 15. J. Courtad 17. J. Moore 
18. K. Siiva 19. B. Moore 20. K. Souder 21. C. Marshai 22. B. Goidman 23. E. Meyer 24. J, Copeiand 2S. L. Lohman 
26, B. Kuriz 27. C, May 28. B. Raynes 



Chi omega/293 



delta 
gommo 



•• 



onujord. 

upiuorcl. 
adhere 
to high ^^ 

ideal/ " I' 



delat gamma/294 




Ai^.^Matm^ 



llMMkd. 



m..^ 



_v* — 



J^#|wn>n 






43 




?r^^ 


1 /AV' 1 


r^\ArU 


/ JxTi \ c 


T^tm 


1 Xi / 1 W 


fijj 


1. D. Hitch. 2. L. Turner, 3. D. Mouyard, 4. C. Lcnahan, 5. M. PIcclano, 6. D. Pack. 7. L. Jones, 8. 

B. Ankenbruck. 9. L. Shaw. 10. B. Falkncr. 11. N. Abercrombie. 12. L. Sanlschl. 15. K. Murray. 16. 

C. Paparonc. 17. D. Zahorec. 18. J. Kopp, 19 B. Murphy. 20. K. Johnson. 21. C. Bertram, 22. S 
DePlero. 23. B. Scarborough. 24. G. Ferguson, 25. D. Langc. 36. D. Karrer. 37. L. Weaver. 38 K 
Hcllly. 39. R. Hall. 40. B. Wagner. 41. K. Blelch. 42. S. Sherman. 43. S. Ankenbruck. 44. E. BIbenholl. 
45. B. Bierman, 46. D. Sarosy, 47. C. Hemsley, 48. M. Young 




13. K. Metcall. 14. M. Thomas. 26. L. Burning. 27. L. Williams. 28. P. Kurllla, 29. L. Scalllde. 30. 
J. Schultz. 31. C. Watklns. 32. L. Goll. 33. B. Fallls. 34. K. Schuller, 35. D. Grancey. 49. M. Tomer, 
50. K. Plefterle. 51. S. Salley. 52. N. Reash, 53. S. Walker, 54. G. Schuller. 55. L. McCoy, 56. G. 
Gerhardt 



delta gamma/295 



delta zeta/296 





delta 
zeto 



•• 



let the 



Nome endure 
forever** 




1. L- Norcia 2. K, Clark 3. J. Harvlth 4. P. Thiel 5. B. 
Thompson 10, N. Dike 11, L. Budal 12. J, Frontino 13. 
R. Huner 19. M. Michael 20. D. Oieyar 21. C. Wallace 22. 
D. Schano 23. E. O'Lekas 




6. W. Tapper 7. J. Zimmerman 8. C Stapf 9 T. Pederson 
14. N. Piatt 15, T, Kyttler 16, N. Himier 17. W Irwin 18 
P. Godshalk 24. D. Martin 25 L Michaux 26( J Gorman 
27. P. Bissler 28. E. Scheerer 29. Mrs. H, Young 



delta zeta/297 



'^^i'i--4t 



HMt- 



^1 



-i^^oS^H^ 




■-.T^: 



^i ^ 



^' 



.A 



w 



gamma phi beta/298 





1. C. Gage 2. C. Bowman 3. C. SeuHert 4. D. Clark 5. S. Uees 6. S. KIrsch 7. J. 
Cabala 13. J. Palmer 14. C. Kubackl 15. W. Stilwell 16. L. Weodbrldge 17. J Bondhus 
18. J. Eberhardt 



AA 


i^s^vT^N r\ 


JnlAJ/TV " 1 


f \rN'°s ( 


"\ vii 


1^0:3-' 


8. M. Akiba 9. C. Johnson 10. N. Soboslay 11. P. TIHany 12. P. Relchert 19. N. Ferrcl 


20. S. Eckert 21. B. Schelder 22. J. Haines 23. L. Gler 



Qornmo 

phi 

beto 

"founded upon 
Q rock" 



gamma phi beta/299 




alpha tau omega/300 




olpho 
tou omego 

**pi ep/ilon. 
ep/ilon pi ** 




1. J. Baker, 2. A. Stelner, 3. A. Orelll, 4. K. Morell. 5. A. Andres, 6. J. Doull, 7. M. Kllbane, 8, K. Zoretlch, 11. 
B. Emott. 12. P, Curllss. 13. V. Dickenson, 14. R. Warren, 15. A. Grisetle, 16. M. FInnen, 17. S. Besselman, 18. 
P. J. Lyons, 19. M. Kile. 20. P. Palmer, 21. T. Rodgers, 26. G. Crown, 29. R. Brewster, 30. S. Glampapa. 31. E. 
Shumskey, 32. G. Hazen, 33. J. Scheg, 34. P. Beaber. 35. A. Berger, 36. M. Hymowllz, 37. W. Roberts, president; 
38. C. Fritz, 39. J. McAllister. 40. B. Howard, 41. C. SImonson, 42. D. Mllkovlcti, 43. D. Elllnger 




9. C. Brlckman, 10. 0. 
Kelley. 22. F. Wojten, 
23. M. Ranz, 24. C. 
Schoenhant. 25. L. 
Loomis, 26. C. Do- 
brovlc. 27. N. Knudt- 
sen, 44. B. Smith. 45. 
M. Joyce, 46. L. 
Morris. 47. R. Rotwrta, 
48. A. Klrkland,49. C. 
Banks 



alpha tau omega/301 






■^ 






IS^v.' 41*=* 



A 



f:.-.m.*j^v 



J^' 



V 



ff4^: 






Sv 



' V - \/' 







I 






m 



delta tau delta/302 



^H-;». 



♦ ■ ■• 



\2;j 



.^-•■T7 










?^ delta 
tou 
delta 



•• 



let 



the /y/tem 
re/t 



in peace** 




1. D. Worllng 2. K. Brady 3. J. Mlllay 4. M. Vogel 5. B. Hoyt 6. B. Sekkes 7. J. Marker 8. O. Muzerik 9. K. Eskstlna 
10. J. Barnes 11. W. Huller 12. S. Llden 13. S. Jenner 14. T. Powers 15. B. SIrey 16. J. Ballangee 17. A, Cortoelt 
18. C Lonsway 19. D. Woznlak 20. M. Sims 21. K. Puhia 22. B. Sheppard 23. F. Thiele 24. C. Connora 25. L. Sledel 
26. M. Dudley 27. T. Bak«r 26. D. Ma«a 29. G. Reese 30. J. Lonsway 31 B. Sledel 32 N. Yales 

delta tau delta/303 




delta 
up/ilon 

"Ju/tice. 
our foundation** 




1. S. Klacz. 2. J. DuBols, 3. D. Slekanlec, 4. C. Perko, 5. P. MoraUlo 
6 J Barbie. 7. L. Konya, 8 W Ha|ec, 9. T. O'Connor, 10. G. Kovach. 
1 1 T. Tedrlck. 1 2. M. CIronl. 1 3. M. Kellar. 14. B. While. 1 5. J. LIpolk, 
16 G. Vaccaro. 17 J Duck. 18. S. Ullls, 19. H. Flaming. 20. T. 
Thompson. 21. C. Conway. 22. S. McDonald, 23. W. Buzzard. 24. 
M. Gritfln. 25 K. Kapolla. 26. G. Allan, 27. J Pazzino, 26. G. Schopler 




delta up3ilon/304 






r^t 



'^ 



lj% 




'ill 


^^K 


^r 




''^^■' — [ 

■-1 


. J 


t^ 


J 



1. J. Rodkey, 2. N. DeHer, 3. 
H. Sllversten, 4. C. Diilley, 5. 
R. Alexander, 6. D. Owens, 7. 
L. Kelley, 8. P. Fanning, 9. J. 
Wilson, 10. R. Utzler, 11. B. 
VanBourgendlen, 12. J. Ale- 
xander, 13. M. Gauger, 14. S. 
Haines, 15. T. Stienosky. 16. 
E. Monaco, 17. T. Fox, IB. J. 
Brenner, 19. S. Konrodt, 20. C. 
Johnson, 21. M. Paris, 22. S. 
Ness, 23. S. Ericson, 24. J. 
Weslow, 25. P. Ladd, 26. J. 
Felkert, 27. E. Monaco, 2B. D. 
Ivy. 29. J. McMamIs, 30. B. 
MacKellar, 31. W. Shisler, 32. 
R. Koehler 





phi delta 
theto 



"one man i/ no man" 



phi delta theta/305 



koppo 
/igmo 

" the Star and 

Cre/ont /holl not 

be uiorn by every 

mon. but only 

by him who i/ 

worthy to ujeor 

it. he mu/t be 

Q Qentlemon. . . 

ond. obove oil 

el/e. one luho 

uioili/ in the 

light of God'' 



Vappa eigma/306 




u~ — T"'" 





1. S. Slmms, 2. G. Tegner, 3. T. Joyce 4. Merk, 5. S. Keith 6. T. Whiting. 7. J. Glllet, 
13. R. Dobson. 14, T. Welnum. 15. J. Fultz. 20. J. Gltnon. 21. M. Macnamera. 22. 
K. Oambach, 23. W. Sanders 




8. R. Huck, 9. G. Konvollnka, 10. J. Taylor, 11. R. Davis. 12. B. Burleson, 16. S. Vamer, 
17. S. Stewart, 18, F. Barnell, 19. R. Wright, 24. G. Kearney. 25. A. Oechellls, 26. 
R. Byrum, 27. 0. Barrett, 28. K. Antes 







mv: 



m^ 



# <%-^% 







^^ c^**- 




fi;^ 




gommo delta 



•• r.* 



ff!end/hip-the 
/uueete/t influence** 




1. T. Valore. 2. P. Angert, 3. S. Pattle, 4. B. Chrysrer, 5. B. Glannamore, 6. S. Bonney, 7. M. Duffie, 
6. B. Mastrlana, 9. F. CImmerair, 10. T. Christman, 11. J. Hlndman. 12. B. ZInk, president; 13. D. 
Schmltl, 14. J. Lossing, 15. M. Undecamp, 16. J. Callahan 




r^ 



17. B. Gross, 18. S. Maravlch, 19. J. Hurley, 20. R. Johnston, 21. R. Collins, 22. B. Stewart. 23. B. 
Romey, 24. T. Huber, 25. D. Sansotta, 26. R. Zwlngler 

phi gamma delta/309 










:'^"<?v; 



';^r^^^^fe»^r^ aiSi:^»<&- 



phr kappa p«l/3lo 



phi hoppQ p/i 






^ i s 



1 C. Mix. 2. M. Fiedler, 3. J. Kapltan, 4. M. Bene«, 5. K. Carr. 6. G. Long, 7. G. Boyer, 8. L. Black, 9. R. PolakowskI, 10. T. Mervar, 11. B. Daw, 

12. C. Green, 13. B. StraHon 



phi hoppQ 
theto 

"everymon i/ alike, 
each man i/ different 



phi 
/igmo 
koppo 

**iuhen men 

come together. 

brotherhood 

unite/" 



S^ 







K^- 



J Tl2 ^ 




/Sii s \ ^.^ 




As r/i^AH 


sv 


c-mPk 




1 ' r I 1 /» 1 ..J 


w^ 


R^Jq\ 


/ / ' Y^i-Vic\ fyCi {^ 


^v^[n 




8X22^291 




SIJ 


1 R. GrlB»er, 2. L Paparone, 3 M Lovelace, 4. D. Pennel, 5. N. Lewie, 6. D. Knowllon, 
7 J Stameu, 8. B. MIha, 9 R. Book, 10. (_ Gaeklns, 11. V. PetrapotI, 12. E. Jablonaky, 
13 S RoWneon. 14. M. Bibb, 15 B. Burns, 16. J Murman, 17. K FInley, 18. N. Petak, 
19 G Petak, 20 J Swlger, 21. K. Milne, 22. T. Malloy, 23. L. Swlget, 24. G. Knough, 
25. S. KamlenskI, 26. C. Everette, 27. J. Tebbe, 28. R. Shlbley, 29. D. Lungard 


phi Bigma kappa/312 





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30. A. Schoolmaster. 31. J. Zimmerman, 32. F. Little. 33. T. Slevans, 34. J. Dunlap, 35. 
Mr. & Mrs. J. Beyer, 36. K. LaHel, 37. E. Brongo. 36. 0. Parlyka. 39. F. Mallon, 40. P. FerKo, 
41. C. Orues. 42. J. Zaiskl. 43. B. Denton, 44. B. Shwartz, 45. P. Calderhead, 46. R. Plpa, 
47. R. Deeler, 48. L. Turner. 49. L. Brandt, 50. M. Cahja, 51. C. Stiufflebottom, 52. G. Tumef, 
S3. S. Lubitti, 54. J. MolOTky, 55. R. Barr, 56. M. DeMass 

phi Sigma kappa/313 



Sigma alpha ep3iion/314 





/igmo 
olpho 
ep/ilon 

"phi olpho** 







1. J. Hucker, 2. F Gallese. 3. B. Brown. 4- L. Balbreshy, 5. K Paulus. 6. D. GoeHicher, 7 G. Weidner. 8. D. Palmieri, 
9, J Shepherd. 10- C. SchutI, 11. G. Ford, 12. J. Slagerwald, 13. G. Garber, 14 D Petruchik, 15. L, Simons. 16. K Brown. 
17. T. Lutz. 18. P, Anthony, 19. D. Scott, 20, A- Winlon, 21, B, Davies. 22, J Lyie, 23, L. Zink, 24, S Vervoorl. 25, A 
Orashan. 26, M Rogalski, 27, B, Barlolone, 28, S, Bechtol, 29, K, McNab, 30, L, Pasquale. 31. J Cassidy, 32, C, Johnson, 
33. B. Baxter, 34, B, Atkinson. 35, R. Kroger, 36 S, Miller. 37 M, Berg. 38 E, Healwole, 39, L, Alexander. 40 F Sherbinsky. 
41. M. Decker, 42, S, Durkee. 43. D Mayhall. 44. F. Hursh, 45. S. Reclenwald, 46. E. Cannon. 47. D. Grancey, 48, K, 
Bernard. 49. B. Wright, 50. T. VaKcentl. 51. D. Kirk, 52. T, Mast. 53, P, Nolan. 54. D. Casey. 55. T. Moulder. 56, S, Devinny 

Sigma alpha epsilon 3i5 



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Sigma chi/316 








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1. M. Pratsner. 2. J. 
Baal, 3. G. Brocketl, 
4. A. Artzner. pres' 
ident; 5. D. Omer, 
B. Laska, 7. S 
Skeggs, 8. D. Bral 
men. 9. C. Hazard, 10. 
P. Worley. 11. S. Mc 
Gaughran. 12. S. Bor- 
well.13.R.SIoffeM4. 
8. Johnston. 15. F. 
Bell, 16. J. Weber, 17 
Colleen Conway, IB. 
F. Head. 19. F. Dan 
timo, 20. K. Wurz, 21 
R. Franco, 22. S. 
Klrsh.23. A. Johnson, 
24. B. Hogan, 25. S. 
Watklns,26.J.Roden, 
29. T. Murphy 




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26. D. Blehl. 27. Mike 
Donovan, 30. K. 
Kraus, 31. S. Perrlne, 
32. M. Glyptls. 33. J. 
Baehr, 34. L. Green, 
35. J. Neville. 36. K. 
Blelch. 37. A. Rezln. 
38. S. Shaffer. 39. T. 
Rowe. 40. J. Tipton. 
41. H. Brumby. 42. 5. 
Boyd. 43. E. Pike. 44. 
P. Thomas. 45. V. 
Cogan,46. U.Jenkins 





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Sigma phi ep8ilon/318 






1 L. Jone3 2. R. Ross 3. B. Butcher 4. J. May 5. R. Thompson 6. J. Dalessandro 7. J. Green 8. R. Stana 
9. M. Babbey 10. K. Thomas 11. J. Slanlna 12. N. Kadlowick 13. S. Rapaport 14. T. LewandowskI 15. B. 
SIrkin 16. M. Stratman 17. K. Nelson 18. Mom Ross 




19 D. Ration 20 J. Yosay 21. D. Speece 22. D Morrow 23. E, Sacer 24, J. Miller 25 H Stevens 26 D 
Slololl 27, B. AnderBon 28. R. KroK 29. M. Sauartn 3(J. V. Harrlgan 31. J. Sanda 32. S, Kerr 33. D. Grimes 
34 G. Larsen 

Sigma phi epsilon 319 



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tau kappa epsilon/322 





9. W. TrlH, 10. K. Brown. 11. Woodstock, 12. D. BraH, 13. M. Braff. 14. 
Rhoades, 15. T. Martin, 16. B. Johnston. 17. D. Johnson. 16. L. Shuft 




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TOM PETIT 

28, photo illustration 53-ac; 54; 65-lx;; 
89-ljcde; 96-fh; 117-d; 168-bde; 169- 
abcd; 1 80-e; 1 85-f ; 1 86-d; 1 88-f ; 1 89-d; 
192-a; 193-b; 208-c; 209-i; 211-acef; 
254; 274; 280-b 




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20, architecture 105-a; 156-g; ■ 
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221 -d; 377-ab 




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photo journalism 23-ce; °70-a; 

-bdg; 140; 141-d; 143; 146-a; 
148-b; I49.a; 151-c; 152-ac; 164-c; 
166-ce; 176-abc; 177-abce; 189-a; 
207; 216- 217-ace; 224-bcclefg; 228- 
alg; 388-b; 389-bc 






JIM HUDAK 

23, transportation management 3-e; 
13-bcd; 62-c; 78-acf; 79-b; 80-dg; 96- 
abcdegli; 97-adgh; 102-bcdg; 103-ad; 
111-cd; 142-b; 156-af; 157-d; 187-d; 
1 88-a; 1 92-eg; 208-a; 21 3-acd; 222-eg; 
223-ce(g; 229-1 



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FRANK SCHWELIK 
21, photo illustration 12-ad; 58-bc; 
64-f; 90; 91; 103-c; 122-a; 123-1x1; 
125-el; 127-c; 153-a; 160-a; 164-b; 
165-a; 168-f; 210-bc(g; 256-b; 385-a 



RONALD MCNEES 
22, piioto journalism 2; 8-def; 9-cd; 
10; 11; 18; 19; 20-b; 21; 58-dg; 61-bd; 
63-d; 73; 98-abcef; 99; 101-acd; 104- 
abde; 106-e; 108-1; 114-ab; 116-ce(; 
117-a; 124-ce; 126-c; 144-b; 172-3; 
178-d; 179-ac; 192-1; 194-a; 214-c; 
217-b; 22g-de; 232-e; 233-be; 236- 
abce; 368-aefg; 369-ac; 373-a; 377-d 



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JIM HUMMEL 

30, post graduate-speech 15-bce; 
16-d; 82-l)ce; 109-d; 170; 171; 176-d; 
177-d; 178-bc; 188-cd; 222-fh; 223- 
abd; 228-cdeh; 249; 382 




DAVE ROSS 

20, telecommunications 4-e; 5-f; 6-ab; 
7-c; 8-a; 9-b; 28-ae; 29-bc; 30; 59-b; 
61 -a; 63-e; 81 -b; 88-ab; 97-bcefi; 
1 1 1 -be; 1 25-ab; 1 61 -c; 1 62-a; 1 63-cde; 
184-adghi; 185-abdeg; 193-e; 194-bc; 
212-ad; 213-b; 219-g; 225-a; 226-(; 
227-c; 232-b; 234-e; 370-b 





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TOM MCGREW 

1 9, advertising 5-a; 28-bccl; 29-a; 
38-ad; 39-b; 41; 46; 47; 62-f; i 
7S-acd; 78-e; 105-b; 106-abcd; 1& 
1 1 3-be; 1 1 5-be; 1 1 6-ab; 1 62-ce; 1 §^! 
193-g; 241-b; 276; 281; 282; 37&' 
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19, theater 6-c; 7-a; 8-bc; 9-a; 65-e; 
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139-bd; 141 -a; 151 -a; 167-a; 168-c; 
189-c; 191-b; 208-de; 212-bc; 219-f; 
232-d; 233-acd; 377-c; 381 -b 



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, business 11 0; 111 -a; 1 60-c; 1 94-d; 
5-b; 218-ab; 219-ab; 222-b; 224-a; 
7-bd; 228-b; 229-ab; 230-a; 232-cg; 
4-c; 236-t 



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21 , public relations 1 6-e; 1 7-d; 74-abc; 
75-b; 84-acde; 85; 92; 93-ae; 94-bcd; 
9S-abd; 114-cde; 115-acd; 122-bc; 
125-d; 131 -a; 132-beh; 133-bdehk; 
134-a; 135-a; 160-b; 161-c; 186-ab; 
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The record Insert In INs yearbook came about as an Idea of making 
the sights and sounds available of the May 1970 tragedy. The sounds 
are only a part of the dozens of reels of tape recorded Information 
WKNT news obtained during that crisis situation. 
Our news department was In constant contact with officials so we 
could pass on Information to the students, community and surround- 
ing areas 

The WKNT news staff was on the scene just minutes after those 
Involved left the downtown area on Friday night. May 1st . . . and 
tape recorded the sounds from that point on. 
Side one of the record has a brief sample of the recordings our 
newsmen taped through and including Sunday night. May 3rd. On 
side two, tfie largest volume of tape recordings had to be digested 
Into a M'h minute summary of all of the events. All of the sounds 
are actualities and none are manufactured, however some of the 
statements heard are e<flted by necessity tor time limitations. 
The sound qualities differ because of the variety of recording equip- 
ment and conditions present at the times the taplngs were made. 
Due to the amount of time allocated . . . the record had to be made 
at the speed of 16, and some distortion is evident through process! rrg. 
Portions of the recordings were also contributed through the efforts 
of Paul Brennan Jr., a WKNT newsman, and Newsman Steve Tit- 
chenal. 

The purpose of ttie record Is to present a better Insight as to what 
was actually heard and said by students, professors, officials, news- 
men and eyewitnesses to the tragic 4-days. Comments by those heard 
were made volunlarfly to WKNT newsmen wtw were on the scene 
during the Kent Stale incident These comments are meant to present 
an unbiased representation of the chronological order of events as 
they look place . . . and should be taken only as one segment of 
those events. 

Sob Carpenter 
WKNT News Director 
Mark Hell 
WKNT Newsman 



photo credit/ 



copy credit/ 



Adamskl. Adam-pp. 193-c; 194-«; 215-af|l: 231-c; 373-d 

Akron Beacon Journal— {(ci 1970 Akron Beacon Joumar p. 33) 

Armstrong, BMI— pp. 1: 37-c 

Davis. Jack— pp. 42-bdgh; 43-acd 

Dickey. Cliaries— p. 63-ab 

DiFioure. Tom-pp. 71-ft 117-1 

Fahi, Priscelia— pp. 162-1: 184-t 

Fetters. Jim— pp. 16B-a; 184-be 

htoey. Gieg— pp. 34-b; 3S-ad; 36-a; 38-b; 40-b 

HIii. Hon-pp. 67-bcd 

Filo. Jotin— (c~ 1970 Vaiiey Daiiy News, Tarentum, Pa. pp. 48-c; 49-c; 50-a; 51-acd; 52-acd; 53-a) 61-c; 65-a; 66-cd; 

67-ae: ^«3-^. 138-a; 139-a: 167-c: 370-c; 378; 379; 388-d 
Hogan, Tom-pp. 119-a 
Keliey, Robert— pp. 17-e; 190-c 
Kestiing, David-pp. 76-acdl; 77-bcd; 7S-d; 79-c; 80-a 
Knowles, Beveriy— p. 266 
Knowies. Terry-pp. 4-c; 12-c; 68; 69-ac; 84-b; 88-c; 100-abde; 120-c; 164-d; 166-b; 167-b; 174; 175; 179-bd; 221-b; 

226-e; 239-a; 265-b: 373-c; 374-a; 375-ac; 391-d 
Lombardl, Unda-pp. 225-cde; 226-acdg; 227-a; 229-c; 23S-a; 236-d; 389-1 
Martin, Sandy-pp. 78-ab; 83-e; 124-a; t64-a 
McGuire, W. J. ili— pp. 6-d; 14-beh; 42-e; 4e-b; 49-a; 62-d; 64-cg; 70-bcdfg; 71-acde; 72; 98-d; 10B-abcdetghi|; 109-a; 

124-1; 125-cg; 129-c; 141-b; 152-b; 153-b; 1S4; 155; 165-bcde; 186-e; 189-b; 190-d; 237; 238; 239-b; 240; 241-a; 

242; 243; 244; 245; 246; 247; 250; 251; 252; 253; 255; 256-a: 258: 259: 260: 261; 262: 263: 264; 265-a: 267; 268: 

269; 271; 272: 273: 278; 279: 280-a: 380-a; 383-c: 3e4-b; 387-b; 388-8: 389-e: 390 
Moore, Doug— pp. 36-ce: 49-b: 50-c: 51 -be 
Moyer, Cindy— p. 112-ab 

Newmeyef, Jane— pp. 3-abct; 103-be: 371-c: 372-b 
Oiivef, Scon- pp. 7-b; 222-acd 
Peck, Jim-pp. 13-a: 15-ad; 16-a; 17-abc; 22: 23-abd: 24; 25: 40-a: eo-bce: 81-acd: 82-adlgh: 83 ^d: 118-ab: 119-be: 

123-ad: 126-g: 127-b; 130-a: 141-c; 142-ac: 145; 151-b: 158-ab: 159-c: 186-c; 187-a: 192-h: 193-a: 384-c; 386-a; 

387-ad: 388-d; 389-g; 389-d; 390-a 
Peddlcord, Al-p. 209-tl 
Piiotographics, Richard Margolis— aii greeks 
Puiver, Craig— pp. 4-a: 62-be: 63-e: 121-bcd: 390-f 
Roberts-p. 126-f 
RuHner. Howanj E.-pp. 20-ad; 26; 27; {itl 1970 Howard E. RuHner 32; 34-a; 37-abc: 38-c: 39-a: 42-acl: 43-b; 44-5: 

48-a: 51-1: 52-bt: 52-be: 56; 57-abcde) 58-ael: 59-de; 60; 61-e: 62-a; 66-e: 87, lOO-cl; 112-cd: 113-acd; 117-e: 118-c: 

126-a; 127-a; 130-bc: 131-bc: 132-acdlgi; 133-aclgi|i: 134-bcd: 135-bc: 136: 137: 13B-b; 139-c; 158-cd: 159-1 

178-a; 185-c; 192-f; 367; 368-bcd: 369-bdel; 370-a; 382-d; 386-b; 391-ac 
RuHner, Marguerite— pp. 4-b: 5-bcde; 12-b: 14-cll; 16-ct: 80-t: 89-a; 117-c; 381-c: 387-c; 389-a; 390-bc: 391-d 
Schafer, Tony— pp. 3-d: lOI-e; 102-a 
Sciiuite, Joann^pp. 57-e; 64-ii: 208-b; 220-g; 226-b 
Scobie. Haroid-pp. 61-t: 124-b: 161-a; 162-b; 163-a; 187-bc: 1S8-be: 190-abl: 192-bcd: 193-e: 214-ad; 21 5-cdeghikni; 

383-d 
Scott, T.-p. 59-ac 

Seme. Biii-pp. 144-a; 146-b: 147: 148-a: 150: 151-de; 153-c: 162-d 
Shawn, Kevin— pp. 4-d; 13-e; 16-b; 76-be; 77-ae; 79-a: 221-ace(g 
Sokol, Mart(-pp. 225-b 
Source, Pat-pp. 128: 129-ab; 257 
Stokias, Jerry-pp. 20-c: 124-d: 163-b; 169-e 
Toiiiver, l-afe— pp. 35-bc; 36-b 
Topie, Paui— pp. 232-a; 248; 275: 277 
Troshane, Eiizabeth— pp. 63-c; 64-abde; 81-e: 93-1; 94-ae; 95-c; 102-el: 104-c; 107-b; 117-b; 120-ad; 193-f: 194-1; 210-ah: 

217-d: 219-«; 230-bcde; 231-abde: 232-1; 376-a 
Weber, Wiiiiam-pp. 375-de 
WInnen, Pete— pp. 14-adg: 122-d: 148-bc: 149-bc: 176-el; 209-ag: 210-de: 2ie-cg: 219rcd; 220-abcdethl: 234-abd; 23S-bcde 



Bob Elusion: 244 
Mary Fitch; 262, 268B, 273, 280A 
Jim Giliel: 134, 178, 180A. ie2B, 256B, 258, Greeks 
Karen Heinieln; 181E, 182D, 242, 247, 259, 263, 280B 
Blake Hurley: 110 
Claire Imbium; 246A, 272 

Deb Milcheil; 128A, 160, 183C, 243. 245A, 249, 252A, 2S6A 
Mary Beth Phillips: 240, 241 A. 248, 267, 268A 
Lisa Ralmondl; 20, 246, 265A, 266, 275, 276 
Nude Runner; 264 

Jim Saelzler: 15. 26, 263. 239A, 241 B. 260. 270A 
Jan Schmitz; 138. 144. 146. 152. 252B. 257. 269, 274A and B 
Joann Schuite: 245B. 255. 265B. 271. 277. 278. 279, 282 
Gene Wiiilams: 183B 

Nancy Wiiilams; 30. 73. 74. 76. 78. 80. 89. 91. 95. 104. 107. 12BB. 172, 177, 1B0B.C.D.E. 181ABCD 182ACE 
1B3A,D. 185. 192. 237. 238. 239. 253. 254. 270B. 281 

re/eorch credit/ 



Larry Black; 95 

Mary Fitch; 182E 

Jim Glllet; 22, 91. 185 

Karen Heinieln; 107, 178 

Blake Hurley; 281 

Claire Imbium; 180D, 181A, 270B 

Deb Mitchell; 180A 

Mary Beth Phillips; 30, 192 

Lisa Ralmondl: 183A 

Dave Ross: 180B 

Jan Schmitz; 78. 89 

Joann SchuHe; 181C, 182A.B,C, 183D 



1971 CHESTNUT BURR staff gives special thanks to: 



AKRON BEAKON JOURNAL- 

Roben H. Giles 
Bill BaggeH 
Henry C. Beck 
Ray Berg 
Michael Blurton 
Margaret Brown 
Davkl L Burke 
Campus Police 
Campus Supply 
Herbert Cfwreck 
The DAILY KENT STATEER 
Jack Davis 
WhitfleM Delaplan* 
Priscllla Fahi 
Jim Fergus 



Jim Fetters 
Sam Fields 
Margaret Rio 
MardI Fulmer 
Gamma Sigma Sigma 
Donald Halter 
Jerry Hayes 
Barbara Hudak 
Ray Hudson 
Blake Hurley 
Bob Irvin 

KSU Computer Center 
John Ledgerwood 
Karen Uberatore 
Robert McKenzle 
William McKlnley 
Richard Margolis 



Sharon Manquis 
Metyzers Photo Supply- 
Tom DIfloure 
Mobobrlous Pit 
Doug Moore 
Al Mull 
Steele Nowlln 
Alan Peckolick 
Murvin Perry 
Sharon Rechner 
Don Roth 
Thomas Ruflner 
Jim Sama 
Bill Sattelmeyer 
Gerald Schneider 
Richard Schrelber 



Don Shook 
Sigma Delta Chi 
Dave SIsson 
Mary Smitk 
Sports Information 
Martha Stout 
Student Activities Board 
George Sulfridge 
Theta Sigma 
William Thomas Moore 
Steve TItchenal 
Robert Tomner 
Paul Tople 
Robert I. While 
Linda Wood 
Florence York 



The 1971 ChMtniit Burr covers Kent State University campus and related areas from March 1970 to March 1971 
In 410 pages, 11 by 11 Inches. Benson Printing Company, Nashville, Tennessee, printed the 11,200 copies. Funds 
allocated by the university from student fees and the sale of space to organizations supplied a total working 
budget ol approximately $70,000. 

The book was printed on Northwest Velvet Coaled Offset Enamel, basis 23 x 34Vi, 134 pounds per 1000. The 
run required 49,460 pounds of paper supplied by Brewer-Chllcote Paper Company, Cleveland, Ohio. The endsheets 
were 22,400 sheets of IIVi x 23.007 -f "Chestnut Burr Special Endleaf-. The Index was printed on 35 lb. yellow 
paper. 

Predominant Ink used was "Chestnut Burr Warm Black Ink", with color printed by a dub Inking process of Day-Gk) 
Inks supplied by The Day-Glo Color Corporation, Cleveland. Ohio. Ttie color Inks were run on pages 1 (salum 
yellow, signal green); 2 (aaturn yellow); 68 (aurora pink, signal green); and 184/185 (a mixture ot aurora pink 
and satwn yellow In varying percentages). Headlines are 60, 30, and 18 pt. Burko Bold and Kiss of Burko, used 



with permission of designer David L Burke; body copy Is 12, 8, and 6 pt. Helvetica Bold and Medium. Forty 
thousand live hundred negatives were shot on trt-x, plus-x, and pan-x processed In D-78. From this number 
approximately 3500 photographs were chosen and screerwd using an 150 line elliptical dot pattern. 
The Chestnut Burr contains a tipped-ln die-cut (85/86) of 1^ Inch round holes ^f% Inch apart, a three-fold llp-ln 
(inie page) used wKh permission of designer Alan Peckollck. and has a 16H rpm EvatoneiR) square soundstteel 
ol plastic sewn In, with Us label taken Irom a design by Al Mull, a Kent student. 

The cover was printed by KIngscralt Covers ol KIngsporl Press Incorporated, KIngsport, Tennessee. II has 4 colors 
plus base color with bleeds head, foot, front and back; a 3-Inch embossed band on the Iront cover, backbone, 
and back cover, debossed circles ol Vh Inches In diameter <^ Inch apart In both vertical and horizontal planes 
over the Iront cover, backbone, and back cover. The circles and tund register with 2 ol the applied colors. Tbe 
colors used were Pantone Red 200. Panlone Rellex Blue, Aluminum 9671 1 x 116-1 Flint Ridge Metallic Ink, and 
black plus cover cloth. TTie book (s smythe sewn and bound by Benson Printing Company. 



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